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NEWS
By H. GEORGE HAHN II | June 19, 1994
A recent letter in The American Scholar magazine crisply expressed a point that the academic left has not yet grasped. Written by a former U.S. Foreign Service officer of German descent, the letter relates how in 1941 in a Berlin air raid shelter as British bombs pounded all around, a German cousin asked him, "You do feel yourself to be a German, don't you?" A rush of adrenalin prompted the writer to retort: "Yes, Wilhelm, my blood is German. But my citizenship is American and my heart is American and my culture is English."
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 5, 1995
INDIANAPOLIS -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole called yesterday for an end to most bilingual education and denounced new proposed standards for teaching history as he sought to cast his presidential bid as a defense of the nation's cultural heritage against divisive assaults by Washington and "intellectual elites."Attacking what he called the "embarrassed-to-be-American crowd," the leading candidate for the GOP presidential nomination told the 77th national convention of the American Legion that "if we are to return this country to greatness, we must do more than restore America's defenses."
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 18, 1993
Washington -- What is another term for twilight besides ''dusk''? In parts of Virginia and Georgia, that's the time between late afternoon and early evening when the light is so dim that ''you can't tell a hawk from a buzzard.''That delightful tidbit comes to you courtesy of the Dictionary of American Regional English. It is the most remarkable work of lexicography since Samuel Johnson in 1755 produced his monumental Dictionary of the English Language.Today's Dr. Johnson is Frederic G. Cassidy, 86, emeritus professor of English at the University of Wisconsin.
NEWS
By RON EMMONS | January 5, 1997
LIKE THOUSANDS of middle-class and middle-class-aspiring African-Americans, I was taught throughout childhood to loathe black English. I was taught it was a lazy tongue, used by people too "low-class" to learn the proper way to speak: Speaking black English would lower me in the eyes of society, and would deprive me of ever getting a good education or a good job.But in the hallways and on the basketball court of my Chicago high school or with my Mississippi-born grandparents,...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Flossie McLain Dedmond, a poet, writer and for more than three decades an English professor and revered administrator at Coppin State College, died Friday of cancer at her West Baltimore home. She was 93."She was without a doubt one of the most dedicated and staunch supporters Coppin has ever known," said the college's president, Calvin W. Burnett. "I, and the entire Coppin family, are deeply saddened."The Rev. Harold A. Carter, pastor of New Shiloh Baptist Church in West Baltimore, where she was a member, described Mrs. Dedmond as "a genuine Sojourner Truth in matters related to the advancement of Afro-Americans and all people in general.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | May 15, 2008
Marietta English will remain president of the Baltimore Teachers Union after soundly defeating longtime rival Sharon Y. Blake in an election yesterday. English captured about 60 percent of the vote to about 34 percent for Blake, union officials announced. About 1,000 educators cast votes. The union has about 8,000 members, 6,000 of them teachers. "I'm very thankful to the membership for putting their trust in me again for the next two years. We're going to continue to work on their behalf," English said.
NEWS
By Kerry A. White and Kerry A. White,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House opened debate yesterday on several measures that would make English the nation's official language, an initiative that promises to face a bumpy road in Congress.All the proposals stress the need for an official national language as a "common bond" or "glue" to "hold the nation together" and assert that a "multilingual government" perpetuates a socially divisive society.The bill with the most co-sponsors, introduced by Rep. Bill Emerson, a Missouri Republican, and Sen. Richard C. Shelby, an Alabama Republican, would not affect federal bilingual education programs, as some other bills would.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | January 5, 1993
TOKYO -- "Man Marking -- We Support Ocean Spirit," a sign outside a tweedy men's clothing shop in Tokyo's glitzy Ginza shopping district says in English.Inside the shop, a clerk is puzzled that two visitors would ask what the sign means."I don't think it really has a meaning," says the clerk, Toshiko Nakamura, a bit tentatively. "I think it's more like -- a feeling."In this capital of commerce, where English is not so much a language as an industry, Ms. Nakamura has put her finger on what makes one branch of that industry profitable.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 30, 1991
LANDOVER -- Washington Bullets rookie guard Alex English is trying to make a name for himself.The second-round draft choice from Virginia Union had seen so little action in the past few weeks, he did not even notice that the back of his new uniform shirt read "E-N-G-I-L-S-H."But he spelled only trouble for the Miami Heat last night, saving 10 of his 12 points for the final quarter as the Bullets rallied for a 105-101 victory before a Capital Centre crowd of 6,101.Watching English perform his high-wire act is like a walk on the wild side.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | January 21, 1996
How do you respond when the attendant at a petrol station in Scotland inquires, "Shall I check the bonnet and dust the windscreen? And are you aware you've been nicked in your wing and your boot?"What do you tell the bloke in an Australian clothing store who smiles, asks, "Is everything apples today?" then helps you coordinate your jumpers, strides and jandles?As I travel about the world, I keep promising to learn at least one foreign language. Thus, a resolution for the new year: I'm going to study English.
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