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NEWS
April 21, 2005
On April 19, 2005, MARY K. ENGLISH (nee Butler); beloved wife of the late Clarence F. English and Andrew E. Rider; devoted mother of Ronald R. Rider and Barbara A. Hawkins; dear sister of Margaret Ziegler. Also survived by six grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Family will receive friends Sunday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City, where a Prayer Service will be held Monday 10 A.M. Interment Crest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
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NEWS
February 19, 1995
Nothing symbolized the emerging readiness of the Irish Republic for eventual Irish political unity and an immediate full role in Europe better than its recent prowess in soccer. Now, after experiencing English soccer hooliganism first-hand, some Irish people may have second thoughts.In Ireland, soccer is a "foreign" game. The 19th century "rediscovery" of Gaelic football and hurling created "national" games that provide exuberant sport and the isolationist satisfaction that only the Irish play them.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
On March 24, 2006, JUANITA IRENE; dear mother of Sally Holderby and husband Bob, Harry English, William English and his wife Mary Ellen and C.M. Smith. Also survived by 19 grandchildren, 27 great-grandchildren and 24 great-great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex at Route 702 (beltway exit 36) on Sunday from 1 P.M. to 3 P.M. Funeral services immediately following at 3 P.M. Interment Rocky Mount Memorial Park in Rocky Mountain, N.C.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1994
PARIS -- The French official, elegant as always, walked into the foreign ministry salon, bowed slightly and started, "Le briefing est off the record."Soon, official use of such a phrase will be against the law if the culture ministry has its way. So will Fun Radio's un-French name and its babble by "le disque-jockey" about "le hit parade."France's old and losing battle against the English language has moved into a new and touchy phase now that the government has presented a draft law to put up a barrier against further foreign incursions.
NEWS
By OLIVIA ABRAHAM | October 6, 1994
Philadelphia. -- The assumption was, and still is made by many educators, that African-Americans could not acquire standard English-language skills. It was advisable to leave black children alone and let them keep their language.I saw this then, and still see it today as self-serving to the mainstream. Self-serving as an attempt to assuage their guilt for the destruction of the black race in this country, which began with slavery.By others, I see it as an attempt to sabotage the efforts of the black community to succeed in society by encouraging a language that impedes assimilation.
NEWS
April 4, 2003
Charlotte McGinnis English, a supporter of programs for the needy who was an arts patron and active in children's theater, died of respiratory failure Saturday at a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. She was 70 and a former Homeland resident. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pa., Charlotte McGinnis earned a bachelor's degree in art in 1954 at Pembroke College of Brown University. She later earned a master's degree in fine arts from the University of Pittsburgh. She was married for more than 30 years to Peter G. English Sr., a Baltimore stockbroker who died in 1990.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
Rosemary R. Eisenhauer, a retired college English professor and former Columbia resident, died of kidney failure Feb. 15 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. She was 73. She was born Rosemary Rattigan in Red Bank, N.J., and raised in Union Beach, N.J. In 1949, she began her college studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, but dropped out a year later when she married Louis Charles Eisenhauer. After her youngest child began attending school, she resumed her education and earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in 1974.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Voice of America, the government-sponsored news organization that has been on the air since 1942, broadcasts in 44 languages - 45 if you count Special English. Special English was developed nearly 50 years ago as a radio experiment to spread American news and cultural information to people outside the United States who have no knowledge of English or whose knowledge is limited. Using a 1,500-word vocabulary and short, simple phrases without the idioms and cliches of colloquial English, broadcasters speak at about two-thirds the speed of conversational English.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | January 4, 1997
BLACK ENGLISH is as good a language, with its own rules and eloquence, as any, a distinguished professor of English was telling me a decade ago.It was hard to dissent. The man, white himself, spoke stage American English with exaggerated diction to perfection.No doubt, I replied. But could a bright, motivated youth speaking this tongue win admission to your college? His bell-clear elocution dissolved into mumble and cough.In discovering Ebonics, the Oakland, Calif., school board is on solid ground, or at least sharing it with contemporary philologists, linguists, lexicographers and the like -- all who try to ascertain what the language is rather than what it ought to be; and who, following Noah Webster and H.L. Mencken, applaud the differences.
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