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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Like other editors, I lead a quiet life, making the daily round from home to paragraph factory and back. Excitement is something I encounter at a remove. So it was from I tweet that I discovered that there is a raging hubbub about literally , including some heavy breathing at Buzzfeed , where someone has been reading the dictionary.  An article by Jessica Misener, "The Wrong Definition Of 'Literally' Is Literally Going In The Dictionary,"  is aghast that those craven lexicographers are listing literally  is used for humorous or emphatic effect, meaning not literally but figuratively.  Well, chill.  Would you think, if someone said, "I was so angry my head literally exploded," that it was time to hire someone to steam the bone fragments and tissue spatter from the wallpaper?
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SOI-DISANT English has a complicated relationship with French. Thanks to the Normans, more than half of English words are of French or Latin derivation. French also enjoyed a very long span of prestige; it was commonly spoken at the royal courts of Europe and was the language of international diplomacy until Anglo-American political, military, and economic power gave English greater heft in the twentieth century.  So it is not surprising that English should have incorporated a large number of words wholesale from French, of which today's word, soi-disant  (pronounced SWAH-duh-SAHN)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
'When  I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.' Yesterday I posted a dispatch on the bogus "over/more than" distinction beloved of journalists, with the expectation that its adherents would prove obstinately resistant to evidence and argument. Almost immediately a number of people delivered themselves into my hands. Here is a ripe specimen posted on Facebook by Raymond Billy of Resonate News: NO ONE cares about split infinitives ;)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Like other editors, I lead a quiet life, making the daily round from home to paragraph factory and back. Excitement is something I encounter at a remove. So it was from I tweet that I discovered that there is a raging hubbub about literally , including some heavy breathing at Buzzfeed , where someone has been reading the dictionary.  An article by Jessica Misener, "The Wrong Definition Of 'Literally' Is Literally Going In The Dictionary,"  is aghast that those craven lexicographers are listing literally  is used for humorous or emphatic effect, meaning not literally but figuratively.  Well, chill.  Would you think, if someone said, "I was so angry my head literally exploded," that it was time to hire someone to steam the bone fragments and tissue spatter from the wallpaper?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SOI-DISANT English has a complicated relationship with French. Thanks to the Normans, more than half of English words are of French or Latin derivation. French also enjoyed a very long span of prestige; it was commonly spoken at the royal courts of Europe and was the language of international diplomacy until Anglo-American political, military, and economic power gave English greater heft in the twentieth century.  So it is not surprising that English should have incorporated a large number of words wholesale from French, of which today's word, soi-disant  (pronounced SWAH-duh-SAHN)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Storch and Charles Storch,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2004
Not so phast. Perfectly good English words are getting a meaning makeover when their beginning letter f is substituted with ph. Think of phat, phishing and phood and you might wonder what the ph is going on. To make it more vexing, there seems no common explanation for the respellings. Phat, meaning very good, excellent or sexy, is said to be African-American argot dating to at least 1963, although some late to the party have made a vulgar acronym of it. Phishing used to mean attending a concert by the band Phish (a name possibly derived from that of band member Jon Fishman)
FEATURES
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,COX NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeing the floor littered with stompies, the drissy wowser told the janitor to stop kicksin' and clean up before the bagmen arrive for the toenadering.Huh?What sounds like gibberish is actually foreign English -- words used by folks in other countries who share the language with Americans, but with their own linguistic twists."Stompies" are cigarette butts in South Africa. New Zealanders use "drissy" as adjective meaning "frantic." A "wowser" is an Aussie with a puritanical disposition.
FEATURES
By Paul Kropp | November 1, 1998
* Total number of words in English: 500,000 (excludes scientific and technical terms)* Number of words in German: 175,000; in French: 125,000* English words recognized by the average American adult: 125,000* Words used in the works of Shakespeare: 30,000* Words used in three hours of prime-time TV: 7,000* Words recognized orally by a child entering school: 6,000* Words ordinarily read "by sight" at the end of third grade: 3,000From "Raising a Reader"Pub Date:...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Campbell | June 16, 2005
Address: www.engrish.com What's the point?: Just as American companies find it chic and edgy to emblazon products with attractive Japanese characters, Japanese advertisers love to plaster English words on their merchandise, often with unintentionally hilarious results. This site documents examples of Japanese clothing, food packaging, public service signs and instruction manuals with seemingly randomly translated English. Travelers can submit photos of their own examples, and viewers can purchase T-shirts inspired by some of the finds.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater | August 4, 2011
OK, so I was assigned to watch and blog about the "Jersey Shore" in Italy season premiere. While I initially believed this was a pointless assignment, I now take back those words. On tonight's episode, no fewer than 10 signs of the apocalypse were revealed.  10) Snooki shared her knowledge of European geography.  9) Snooki's dad volunteered to be a male stripper.  8) Eight of 10 Twitter trending topics in Baltimore were Jersey Shore related.  7) Snooki and Sammi decided to get fake breasts together.  6)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
'When  I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.' Yesterday I posted a dispatch on the bogus "over/more than" distinction beloved of journalists, with the expectation that its adherents would prove obstinately resistant to evidence and argument. Almost immediately a number of people delivered themselves into my hands. Here is a ripe specimen posted on Facebook by Raymond Billy of Resonate News: NO ONE cares about split infinitives ;)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Storch and Charles Storch,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2004
Not so phast. Perfectly good English words are getting a meaning makeover when their beginning letter f is substituted with ph. Think of phat, phishing and phood and you might wonder what the ph is going on. To make it more vexing, there seems no common explanation for the respellings. Phat, meaning very good, excellent or sexy, is said to be African-American argot dating to at least 1963, although some late to the party have made a vulgar acronym of it. Phishing used to mean attending a concert by the band Phish (a name possibly derived from that of band member Jon Fishman)
FEATURES
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,COX NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeing the floor littered with stompies, the drissy wowser told the janitor to stop kicksin' and clean up before the bagmen arrive for the toenadering.Huh?What sounds like gibberish is actually foreign English -- words used by folks in other countries who share the language with Americans, but with their own linguistic twists."Stompies" are cigarette butts in South Africa. New Zealanders use "drissy" as adjective meaning "frantic." A "wowser" is an Aussie with a puritanical disposition.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 5, 1997
MOSCOW -- In the old days, shop signs here meant what they said.If a sign said "moloko," or milk, that's exactly what the store sold, nothing more, nothing less.Then came the post-Soviet capitalist boom in goods and services. The fallout was a thicket of foreign-language signs to describe concepts or styles modern Russia had never heard of.For certain Russians -- mostly the young and the hip -- the now nearly ubiquitous English words "supermarket," "mini-market," "drugstore," "pub," and "shop" are a splash of capitalistic cachet.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1997
NEW YORK -- The morning's copy of the Ming Pao Daily News is on a shelf in front, and the eight aisles of the Hong Kong Supermarket are packed with shoppers. Up the street -- past the Chinese video stores, some two dozen markets and Mandarin Cultural Enterprises, where they sell pictures of Chairman Mao -- some of the old men are playing a spirited game of mah-jongg in the back room of an old bakery.The signs bear Chinese characters, but no English. The scene could be from a smaller village in south China, or maybe from the heart of lower Manhattan's thick Chinatown.
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