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By CHRISTOPHER FOREMAN | February 5, 1992
Washington -- Even now, more than 25 years after the fact, I feel the sting of being unmasked on television as a plagiarist. It happened in Baltimore about 1964, when I was about 12. I wanted to write. But even more -- perhaps I was already a budding academic -- I yearned to ''publish.''I found my vehicle in a man named John Bartholomew Tucker. Young and personable -- I believe he was a former English teacher -- with a voice that dripped neighborliness, Tucker hosted a local late-afternoon television program called ''People Are Talking.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Patricia Dixon Johnson, a retired teacher and educational volunteer, died of heart failure Monday at Roland Park Place. She was 90 and had lived in Phoenix in Baltimore County. Born Patricia Mary Coles in Seattle, she was the daughter of Norman E. Coles, a construction business owner, and Franc Delong Coles, an assistant to the engineering dean at the University of California at Los Angeles. She earned a bachelor's degree at the University of California at Los Angeles in 1944 and then joined the Cadet Nurse Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Joel R. Bailey, a longtime Baltimore County public school English teacher who also coached basketball, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 77. "The first thing, Joel really liked his students. ... He enjoyed interacting with them. He was a gentleman," said William L. McIntyre, who grew up with and attended elementary, middle and high schools with Mr. Bailey. "He was the same way in basketball. He was a good teaching coach. He communicated well with his students and he respected them, and they respected him," said Mr. McIntyre, a retired Eastern Technical High School social studies teacher.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The rumor was that the president of the United States was going to appear at Baltimore City College on Thursday, so teacher Mark Miazga swapped his usual polo for a shirt and tie in case he got a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity before resuming his day of teaching Steinbeck. But it wasn't long into the assembly at City College - whose marching band, cheerleaders and choir showcased their talents and set a festive tone for 600 students, political leaders, and state and local education officials - that Miazga was stunned by the announcement that he was the guest of honor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Philip X. "Phil" Kaltenbach, a former high school English teacher who later became an expert in the field of collectible comic books, died Tuesday at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla., while recovering from foot surgery. He was 63. The son of a Loyola University Maryland dean and a Loyola Blakefield High School administrative assistant, Philip Xavier Kaltenbach was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. Mr. Kaltenbach was a 1967 graduate of Loyola Blakefield and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Diane Jacobs | June 24, 1997
FOR YEARS, I have been told that I look like an English teacher -- or that I don't. In a world of logic, neither observation should mean anything to anyone, least of all to me.I love my profession and feel honored to be an English teacher. But after 25 years I have decided that it is now or never if I am to decipher what people mean when they say to me, ''You look just like an English teacher,'' or ''You don't look anything like an English teacher at all!''I have an uncomfortable feeling that looking like an English teacher is not a good thing, at least not by the standards of traditional feminine beauty.
NEWS
June 28, 2003
Daniel Fader, an English teacher and author, died Monday of cancer at his Truro, Mass., home. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ashburton and on Dolfield Avenue, he was a 1948 City College graduate and attended Loyola College. He earned degrees at Cornell University and a doctorate at Stanford University. He also studied at Cambridge University. In 1961, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he taught English and was the founding chairman of the English Composition Board.
NEWS
November 23, 2006
Helen M. Daniels, a former college English teacher and active member of Metropolitan Community Church of Baltimore, died of a heart attack Friday at her Catonsville home. She was 48. Born and raised in Laredo, Texas, Ms. Daniels earned a bachelor's degree in liberal arts in 1978 from the State University of New York at Plattsburgh and a master's in creative writing from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York in 1980. After a decade of teaching at City University of New York, she taught English from 1998 until last year at the Community College of Baltimore County's Catonsville campus.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
Jeannette R. Cadwallader, an English teacher at Franklin High School in Reisterstown, died Tuesday of complications of ovarian cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Reisterstown resident was 57. Born Jeannette Ruth Liberda in Philadelphia, she attended Abraham Lincoln High School there and received a bachelor's degree in education from West Chester University in Pennsylvania. She began her career with the Baltimore County public school system in 1972. She taught English at Franklin Junior High School, Woodlawn Junior High School, Deer Park Junior High School and Franklin High School.
NEWS
November 13, 2006
Beulah Georges, a retired high school English teacher, died of a stroke Tuesday at Blakehurst Health Center in Towson. She was 83. Born Beulah George in Towson above the Candy Kitchen, a business her father owned, she was a 1939 Towson High School graduate and earned an English degree at Goucher College. In 1956 she married Dr. Constant J. Georges, a dentist who is now retired. She began teaching in the Baltimore County public school system and later earned a master's degree at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
January 26, 2014
As a retired AP English teacher, I appreciated Liz Bowie 's extensive discussion of the current misuses and abuses of the College Board's AP program ( "Some parents, educators rethinking the role of AP," Jan. 18). I participated in national AP conferences in Los Angeles in 2003 and Houston in 2005. On both occasions, one message consistently came through loud and clear: From the College Board's point of view, the program is not about taking and passing the AP exams. It is intended to create a special atmosphere, a learning climate for high school students looking for an educational experience more challenging than they find provided in their high schools' honors courses.
NEWS
By Jack C. Hill | January 20, 2014
As an English teacher, I've always enjoyed the pleasures of reading; specifically, the writings of 19th and 20th century martyrs and confessors who used eloquent narratives and folklore to tell stories of their rags and redemption. But my reading never quite prepared me for the task of reflecting on my personal experience with a particular martyred leader from which my own life, faith and view of the world would be deeply affected. I grew up in Baltimore and was raised by a single mother who believed that storytelling and faith was all that mattered.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
When you hear someone going on about The Rules in English, you should be on your guard, just as when some personage with a clerical collar starts to say, "The Church has always taught. ... " You are likely to hear, at best, a misconception, at worst, an outright whopper.  I have tried to establish the usefulness of distinguishing rules from conventions, shibboleths, superstitions, house style, and individual aesthetic preferences .  Take, for example, the eighteenth-century convention of separating subject from verb with a comma.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
My son's English teacher recently told me she was worried about how he was doing in her class. I had a long talk with him, and a few hours later he came to me asking for help understanding the directions for a research project. Good, I think. He's taking the warning seriously and getting to work. But as I started to look over the instructions, he pulled out his phone and began Snapchatting with friends. I told him to put the phone away, but he kept sneaking peeks at it even as I tried to talk with him about the assignment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Joel R. Bailey, a longtime Baltimore County public school English teacher who also coached basketball, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 77. "The first thing, Joel really liked his students. ... He enjoyed interacting with them. He was a gentleman," said William L. McIntyre, who grew up with and attended elementary, middle and high schools with Mr. Bailey. "He was the same way in basketball. He was a good teaching coach. He communicated well with his students and he respected them, and they respected him," said Mr. McIntyre, a retired Eastern Technical High School social studies teacher.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Christopher Adam Wright, a teacher and former restaurant worker, died of an aneurysm Aug. 27 in Bogota, Colombia, where he was working as an English teacher. The former Mount Vernon resident was 40. Born in Towson, he was the son of John T. Wright, a concert producer at Pier Six who lives in Hunt Valley, and Colleen Hill Wright, a child therapist who lives in Jacksonville, Fla. Raised in Jarrettsville, he attended Jarrettsville Elementary School and North Harford Middle School and was a 1991 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School.
NEWS
January 16, 2006
Donald Byrd Marston Sr., an English and reading teacher who was once a top-ranked table tennis player, died of pneumonia Jan. 9 at Sinai Hospital after an extended illness. He was 79 and had lived in Sykesville. He taught for more than 30 years at the old Brooklyn Park Junior/Senior High School in Baltimore. He was stern in the classroom, said his daughter, Barbara Fost of Catonsville, but was also funny and passionate about his work. Mr. Marston, who was born in California, earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1998
ENGLISH TEACHER Cindy Drummond is "a wonderful person who truly enjoys teen-agers," according to Maryann West, ninth-grade team leader at Wilde Lake High School."
NEWS
April 25, 2013
Laura Doolan, an English teacher at Westminster High School, was named Carroll County 2013 Teacher of the Year during the Board of Education's employee recognition ceremony on Thursday. "Ms. Doolan is a champion of students, working tirelessly beyond expectations to nurture students' academic growth and social well-being," said Janetta Jayman, supervisor of English and World Languages for Carroll County Public Schools. "Her belief in creating successful learning experiences for all students has been the foundation for her own successful teaching career.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Frances H. Mueller, a retired educator who had chaired the Bryn Mawr School's English department and also taught at Towson University, died March 24 of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place. She was 94. Born and raised on her parents' farm in Painesville, Ohio, Frances Heckathorne was a graduate of local public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1939 from Lake Erie College, Mrs. Mueller taught English from 1943 to 1946 at Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pa. While at Penn State, she earned a master's degree in English from Columbia University in 1945, and the next year married William Randolph Mueller, a philosopher, clergyman, literary historian and author.
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