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NEWS
March 26, 1997
THEY DON'T give an Oscar for historical accuracy, or it would have been one that "The English Patient" didn't win. The internationally made movie ran away with nine, including best picture, in the 69th annual Academy Awards ritual of self-congratulation before a world-wide audience."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Sun Staff | January 4, 2004
Critic Peter Conrad has written an unconventional biography of Orson Welles by examining his career as a filmmaker, actor and writer in the context of the facts, self-inventions and obsessions of his tumultuous life. Conrad traces Welles' connections with Shakespearean tragic figures, his manifestations as Charles Foster Kane in Citizen Kane and Harry Lime in The Third Man and his countless uncompleted film projects. Conrad's Orson Welles: The Stories of His Life (Faber and Faber, 368 pages, $25)
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 1997
"The English Patient," a passionate story of doomed love played out against the tragedy of World War II, dominated the 69th Annual Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences last night, winning nine awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.But it was shut out of the two major acting awards, when both its stars, Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas, finished out of the money.Instead, Geoffrey Rush, the Australian actor who brought dignity and pain to his portrayal of a concert pianist haunted from childhood by mental difficulties, won the Academy Award for "Shine."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Love means never having to say you're sorry about anything you do during wartime. That might as well be the slogan of writer-director Anthony Minghella's fancy anti-war romantic spectacles, The English Patient (1996) and its spiritual prequel, the far less accomplished and even less plausible Civil War epic Cold Mountain. Minghella can be a genius when he directs his own original screenplays, like Truly Madly Deeply (1991), the thinking and feeling man's Ghost. As an adapter he has a glass jaw and a tin ear. "Maybe you can't see my face," says Minghella's typically scarred hero, played this time by Jude Law, not The English Patient's Ralph Fiennes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1996
"The English Patient" plunges one into the heart of radiance: It's a heat that can maim cruelly, as applied to flesh; or it's a heat that can heal, also as applied to flesh, but necessarily involving someone else's flesh as well.Those are the possibilities covered by the film, which is another way of saying its possibilities encompass the whole world, as well as the entire metaphorical spectrum of fire. A love story, a spy story, a war story, an airplane story, a desert story, even a bomb-disposal story (and a damn good one!
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1996
It may have been possible for a movie version of "The English Patient" to capture the spirit of Michael Ondaatje's sublime novel, but the current film directed by Anthony Minghella must disappoint anyone who has read and loved the book. In principle it need not have been so.Although the words of novels do not find absolute equivalents in the images of film, film offers the power of physical reality to which a novel can only refer. "Words, Caravaggio," says Count de Almasy in the novel, "they have a power."
FEATURES
By William Arnold and William Arnold,New York Daily News Pub Date: 3/30/97 SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | March 30, 1997
As this year's best picture Oscar winner, "The English Patient" is fulfilling a long-standing tradition: It has inspired a boom of tourism for its romantic setting.Ever since the 1935 winner, "Mutiny on the Bounty," turned Tahiti into a major tourist destination in the '30s, best-picture winners -- which tend to be big historical epics set in exotic places -- have had a remarkable way of sending legions of movie-influenced travelers on pilgrimages.The 1958 winner, "Bridge on the River Kwai," for instance, overnight turned the River Kwai-Kanchanaburi prison-camp site into Thailand's third largest tourist draw, and 40 years later it still is, with a sound and light show simulating the effects for visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 30, 2000
Michael Ondaatje came crashing onto America's stage with the immense success of the movie adaptation of his 1992 novel "The English Patient." To me, the film was a trivial -- though slick and engaging -- entertainment, in contrast to the book, which is splendidly purposeful, humane and artful. Now comes "Anil's Ghost," (Knopf, 311 pages, $25), Ondaatje's first novel since "The English Patient." Born in Sri Lanka and living in Canada since 1962, he has published two other novels, a memoir, three prose anthologies and 11 volumes of poetry.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | October 25, 1992
THE ENGLISH PATIENT.Michael Ondaatje.Knopf.307 pages. $21. Toward the close of World War II, in the half-ruined Villa San Girolamo in the Tuscan hills, a young Canadian nurse named Hana cares for a man who has been burned beyond recognition in an airplane crash in the North African desert. He is dying without having divulged his name; he says only that he is English. He lies immobile in bed -- "a man without a face, an ebony pool" -- while his mind wanders back to the journey across the desert with the Bedouin who saved his life, and to his desert expeditions of the previous decade in search of legendary oases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | April 17, 2003
The English Patient was Ralph Fiennes' biggest hit. It has been his curse. Sure, the movie snagged him an Oscar nomination and huge box office, but it also fixed his image, at least in the minds of movie studio heads, as a guy who looks good mourning a lost love. "That's why I loved Spider," says Fiennes. "I loved this lonely figure who hardly speaks and is totally isolated. It has this spare, weird atmosphere, not at all the sort of romantic parts I'm usually offered." Fiennes had signed up for the drama - a creepy affair about a man who revisits the scenes of his childhood, attempting to make sense of the tragedies that befell him there - when David Cronenberg (Dead Ringers, Crash)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | April 17, 2003
The English Patient was Ralph Fiennes' biggest hit. It has been his curse. Sure, the movie snagged him an Oscar nomination and huge box office, but it also fixed his image, at least in the minds of movie studio heads, as a guy who looks good mourning a lost love. "That's why I loved Spider," says Fiennes. "I loved this lonely figure who hardly speaks and is totally isolated. It has this spare, weird atmosphere, not at all the sort of romantic parts I'm usually offered." Fiennes had signed up for the drama - a creepy affair about a man who revisits the scenes of his childhood, attempting to make sense of the tragedies that befell him there - when David Cronenberg (Dead Ringers, Crash)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
I don't know what kind of actor I am, to be honest," Ralph Fiennes says. "Every part I approach differently, and sleep with the director if I can." There it is, that sneaky wit. The subdued Fiennes uses it sparingly at a Toronto coffee shop, but he wields it to pinprick effect. As in most interviews with the British star of Spider (tentatively scheduled for a Baltimore opening in April), Fiennes is asked to dissect his love of the tormented. A joke or two makes the heavy talk go down easier.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 17, 2001
Captain Corelli's Mandolin is a big picture with a piercing beauty. Although it's in the same genre as The English Patient, it's a vastly better movie - more surprising and original, more rigorous and sympathetic. This film is oddly shaped. It is also heartbreaking and exhilarating. Set on the Greek island of Cephallonia during World War II, it hinges on the love affair between pert, intelligent Pelagia (Penelope Cruz), the daughter of the island doctor (John Hurt), and the robust, musical Captain Corelli (Nicolas Cage)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 30, 2000
Michael Ondaatje came crashing onto America's stage with the immense success of the movie adaptation of his 1992 novel "The English Patient." To me, the film was a trivial -- though slick and engaging -- entertainment, in contrast to the book, which is splendidly purposeful, humane and artful. Now comes "Anil's Ghost," (Knopf, 311 pages, $25), Ondaatje's first novel since "The English Patient." Born in Sri Lanka and living in Canada since 1962, he has published two other novels, a memoir, three prose anthologies and 11 volumes of poetry.
FEATURES
By William Arnold and William Arnold,New York Daily News Pub Date: 3/30/97 SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | March 30, 1997
As this year's best picture Oscar winner, "The English Patient" is fulfilling a long-standing tradition: It has inspired a boom of tourism for its romantic setting.Ever since the 1935 winner, "Mutiny on the Bounty," turned Tahiti into a major tourist destination in the '30s, best-picture winners -- which tend to be big historical epics set in exotic places -- have had a remarkable way of sending legions of movie-influenced travelers on pilgrimages.The 1958 winner, "Bridge on the River Kwai," for instance, overnight turned the River Kwai-Kanchanaburi prison-camp site into Thailand's third largest tourist draw, and 40 years later it still is, with a sound and light show simulating the effects for visitors.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
THEY DON'T give an Oscar for historical accuracy, or it would have been one that "The English Patient" didn't win. The internationally made movie ran away with nine, including best picture, in the 69th annual Academy Awards ritual of self-congratulation before a world-wide audience."
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 17, 1996
The Brits haven't yet figured out that movie people are supposed to be cool. For God's sake, even a guy like Jon Lovitz knows that and is trying to get with it these days! But to a man, they appear for interviews as dowdy, blimpy, regular guys, well-packed in avoirdupois and well-swaddled in bad clothes.Take Anthony Minghella, for example. Minghella, an award-winning English playwright, hit the big time, sort of, a few years back with "Truly Madly Deeply," which was called an intelligent "Ghost," an act of romantic mesmerization with Alan Rickman and Juliet Stevenson.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Love means never having to say you're sorry about anything you do during wartime. That might as well be the slogan of writer-director Anthony Minghella's fancy anti-war romantic spectacles, The English Patient (1996) and its spiritual prequel, the far less accomplished and even less plausible Civil War epic Cold Mountain. Minghella can be a genius when he directs his own original screenplays, like Truly Madly Deeply (1991), the thinking and feeling man's Ghost. As an adapter he has a glass jaw and a tin ear. "Maybe you can't see my face," says Minghella's typically scarred hero, played this time by Jude Law, not The English Patient's Ralph Fiennes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 1997
"The English Patient," a passionate story of doomed love played out against the tragedy of World War II, dominated the 69th Annual Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences last night, winning nine awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.But it was shut out of the two major acting awards, when both its stars, Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas, finished out of the money.Instead, Geoffrey Rush, the Australian actor who brought dignity and pain to his portrayal of a concert pianist haunted from childhood by mental difficulties, won the Academy Award for "Shine."
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1996
It may have been possible for a movie version of "The English Patient" to capture the spirit of Michael Ondaatje's sublime novel, but the current film directed by Anthony Minghella must disappoint anyone who has read and loved the book. In principle it need not have been so.Although the words of novels do not find absolute equivalents in the images of film, film offers the power of physical reality to which a novel can only refer. "Words, Caravaggio," says Count de Almasy in the novel, "they have a power."
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