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May 21, 2007
Liam Daley, a 22-year-old playwright from Pennsylvania, has won Washington College's Sophie Kerr Prize, worth $60,027 this year. Daley, who graduated from the college yesterday with a double major in drama and English literature, says he will use some of the money to travel to Scotland and study Shakespeare. (Article, Page 6B)
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March 28, 2012
On March 21, Aberdeen High School again hosted the Hall of Fame event that was initiated in 2006. These events honor past Aberdeen High graduates who are positive mentors to youth and demonstrate commitment to their community and exceptionality in their field. After a breakfast for inductees, families and other invited guests, a warm welcome by Belawoe Akwakoku, and the national anthem sung by student Aria Real, the program followed. On stage were paintings of the 2012 inductees: John Bender, John Landbeck and Maurice Wallace.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 20, 2009
Francis Xavier "Xav" Trainor, a retired college educator and a World War II veteran, died in his sleep Tuesday at Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster. The Finksburg resident was 85. Mr. Trainor was born and raised in West Baltimore. He was a graduate of city public schools and served in Navy communications in the Caribbean from 1942 to 1946. In 1951, he earned a bachelor's degree from Loyola College, and later returned to the North Baltimore college to obtain his master's degree. He began his teaching career in 1952 at Patterson Park High School, where he taught writing and English literature for 18 years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Lucy I. Bickford, a retired Baltimore County English teacher, died of heart failure June 10 at Mays Chapel Ridge. The former Towson resident was 91. Born Lucy Impaciatore in Philadelphia, she earned a bachelor of science degree in education from Temple University in 1941. She later received a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. She performed in Shakespearean plays while a student. She and her family moved to Maryland in 1944. She initially taught at St. Michael's in Talbot County and a year later began teaching in the Baltimore County school system.
EXPLORE
March 28, 2012
On March 21, Aberdeen High School again hosted the Hall of Fame event that was initiated in 2006. These events honor past Aberdeen High graduates who are positive mentors to youth and demonstrate commitment to their community and exceptionality in their field. After a breakfast for inductees, families and other invited guests, a warm welcome by Belawoe Akwakoku, and the national anthem sung by student Aria Real, the program followed. On stage were paintings of the 2012 inductees: John Bender, John Landbeck and Maurice Wallace.
NEWS
By JOHN E. McINTYRE | June 26, 1994
Death carried off Cleanth Brooks and Harry Levin last month. You could be discovering that on this page -- given that American newspapers, magazines and broadcasters are not much inclined to notice the passing of superannuated literary scholars. But if you studied English literature in college at any time over the past 40 years, these men touched your life, however indirectly or anonymously.Both followed the classic American pattern of rising from the heartland into prominence -- Levin, born in Minneapolis in 1912, becoming a professor at Harvard; Brooks, born in Murray, Ky., in 1906, becoming a professor at Yale.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
The Rev. Harold E. "Hap" Ridley, a Jesuit priest who strengthened Loyola College in its transformation into a regional university in his decade as president, was found dead yesterday morning at his home on the eastern edge of the school's North Baltimore campus. He was 65. Father Ridley apparently died Tuesday night, and his body was found by his secretary, a college spokesman said, adding that the cause of death had not been determined. A former professor of Victorian English literature, he was credited with raising millions of dollars for a new business school building, as well as fitness and student centers.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
W. Curtis Carroll Davis, a Baltimore writer and critic with an interest in espionage stemming from World War II service as a military interrogator, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 80 and lived in Guilford."He was a gentleman scholar, and in the field of literary history established himself," said James H. Bready, a retired Evening Sun editorial writer and author of The Sun's "Books and Authors" column.Mr. Davis' books included three biographies: "Chronicler of the Cavaliers: A Life of the Virginia Novelist Dr. William A. Caruthers;" The King's Chevalier: A Biography of Lewis Littlepage;" and "That Ambitious Mr. Legare: The Life of James M. Legare of South Carolina.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2010
Dan L. Jones, former dean of Towson University's College of Liberal Arts who was later the university's interim president, died Thursday of sepsis at Sinai Hospital. He was 72 and lived in Pikesville. "His death is such a blow. Dan Jones was responsible for my entire academic career, as a writer and a teacher. I'm a contraption invented by Dan Jones," saud Clarinda Harriss, a poet who succeeded Dr. Jones and chaired the English department at Towson for nine years until stepping down in 2004.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2002
You could argue that all the comic confusion of She Stoops to Conquer - the mishaps, the mischief-making, the missive sent awry - begins when a man gets lost and won't ask for directions. In a way, it's reassuring to note that human nature has changed so little since 1773, when Oliver Goldsmith's play first was produced. We recognize ourselves in the characters we see on stage in the Folger Theatre's solid production, and we laugh with recognition. She Stoops is based on a practical joke played on Goldsmith as a young man, when he was tricked into mistaking a country home belonging to a friend of his father's for an inn. Goldsmith ordered the "inn-keeper" about in a cavalier fashion, and didn't discover his error until the next morning, when he tried to settle his bill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2010
Dan L. Jones, former dean of Towson University's College of Liberal Arts who was later the university's interim president, died Thursday of sepsis at Sinai Hospital. He was 72 and lived in Pikesville. "His death is such a blow. Dan Jones was responsible for my entire academic career, as a writer and a teacher. I'm a contraption invented by Dan Jones," saud Clarinda Harriss, a poet who succeeded Dr. Jones and chaired the English department at Towson for nine years until stepping down in 2004.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 20, 2009
Francis Xavier "Xav" Trainor, a retired college educator and a World War II veteran, died in his sleep Tuesday at Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster. The Finksburg resident was 85. Mr. Trainor was born and raised in West Baltimore. He was a graduate of city public schools and served in Navy communications in the Caribbean from 1942 to 1946. In 1951, he earned a bachelor's degree from Loyola College, and later returned to the North Baltimore college to obtain his master's degree. He began his teaching career in 1952 at Patterson Park High School, where he taught writing and English literature for 18 years.
NEWS
May 21, 2007
Liam Daley, a 22-year-old playwright from Pennsylvania, has won Washington College's Sophie Kerr Prize, worth $60,027 this year. Daley, who graduated from the college yesterday with a double major in drama and English literature, says he will use some of the money to travel to Scotland and study Shakespeare. (Article, Page 6B)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
The Rev. Harold E. "Hap" Ridley, a Jesuit priest who strengthened Loyola College in its transformation into a regional university in his decade as president, was found dead yesterday morning at his home on the eastern edge of the school's North Baltimore campus. He was 65. Father Ridley apparently died Tuesday night, and his body was found by his secretary, a college spokesman said, adding that the cause of death had not been determined. A former professor of Victorian English literature, he was credited with raising millions of dollars for a new business school building, as well as fitness and student centers.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2002
You could argue that all the comic confusion of She Stoops to Conquer - the mishaps, the mischief-making, the missive sent awry - begins when a man gets lost and won't ask for directions. In a way, it's reassuring to note that human nature has changed so little since 1773, when Oliver Goldsmith's play first was produced. We recognize ourselves in the characters we see on stage in the Folger Theatre's solid production, and we laugh with recognition. She Stoops is based on a practical joke played on Goldsmith as a young man, when he was tricked into mistaking a country home belonging to a friend of his father's for an inn. Goldsmith ordered the "inn-keeper" about in a cavalier fashion, and didn't discover his error until the next morning, when he tried to settle his bill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
Jackson I. Cope, an author and former professor of English and comparative literature at the Johns Hopkins University, died Thursday from complications of liver disease at Castle Franco Hospital in Venice, Italy. He was 73.Mr. Cope taught at Hopkins from 1961 to 1972, when he became Leo S. Bing Professor of English at the University of Southern California. He retired from USC in 1987.He returned to Baltimore to lecture at Hopkins and stayed until his 1996 move to Venice.Considered an expert in Renaissance literature and drama, he also was an acknowledged authority on the works of John Milton, James Joyce and Robert Coover.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Lucy I. Bickford, a retired Baltimore County English teacher, died of heart failure June 10 at Mays Chapel Ridge. The former Towson resident was 91. Born Lucy Impaciatore in Philadelphia, she earned a bachelor of science degree in education from Temple University in 1941. She later received a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. She performed in Shakespearean plays while a student. She and her family moved to Maryland in 1944. She initially taught at St. Michael's in Talbot County and a year later began teaching in the Baltimore County school system.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
Jackson I. Cope, an author and former professor of English and comparative literature at the Johns Hopkins University, died Thursday from complications of liver disease at Castle Franco Hospital in Venice, Italy. He was 73.Mr. Cope taught at Hopkins from 1961 to 1972, when he became Leo S. Bing Professor of English at the University of Southern California. He retired from USC in 1987.He returned to Baltimore to lecture at Hopkins and stayed until his 1996 move to Venice.Considered an expert in Renaissance literature and drama, he also was an acknowledged authority on the works of John Milton, James Joyce and Robert Coover.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
W. Curtis Carroll Davis, a Baltimore writer and critic with an interest in espionage stemming from World War II service as a military interrogator, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 80 and lived in Guilford."He was a gentleman scholar, and in the field of literary history established himself," said James H. Bready, a retired Evening Sun editorial writer and author of The Sun's "Books and Authors" column.Mr. Davis' books included three biographies: "Chronicler of the Cavaliers: A Life of the Virginia Novelist Dr. William A. Caruthers;" The King's Chevalier: A Biography of Lewis Littlepage;" and "That Ambitious Mr. Legare: The Life of James M. Legare of South Carolina.
NEWS
By JOHN E. McINTYRE | June 26, 1994
Death carried off Cleanth Brooks and Harry Levin last month. You could be discovering that on this page -- given that American newspapers, magazines and broadcasters are not much inclined to notice the passing of superannuated literary scholars. But if you studied English literature in college at any time over the past 40 years, these men touched your life, however indirectly or anonymously.Both followed the classic American pattern of rising from the heartland into prominence -- Levin, born in Minneapolis in 1912, becoming a professor at Harvard; Brooks, born in Murray, Ky., in 1906, becoming a professor at Yale.
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