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October 20, 2012
The Board of County Commissioners will hold its public hearing on Tuesday, Oct. 30, regarding the proposal to designate English as the official language of Carroll County. The hearing will be held at 7 p.m. at the New Windsor Community Building, Community Meeting Room, 1100 Green Valley Road, New Windsor. This ordinance, if passed, would recognize English as the language in which all official county business will be conducted. The ordinance, as proposed, can be read HERE Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement that it would "ensure that all official county business is conducted in English, which will save the county money, simplify county communications and provide incentives to learn English to those living in Carroll County.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A recent article at Slate  by Gretchen McCulloch, "Why Do You Think You're Right About Language? You're Not,"  prompts some fruitful thinking about idiolects.  An idiolect is " not just vocabulary; it's everything from how we pronounce certain words to how we put them together to what we imagine they mean. " It's the whole set of associations from regional origins, family habits of language, education, reading, and jobs.  And English, the macro language, is the sum total of all our respective idiolects; it's crowdsourced.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Amid the quaint brick storefronts of Westminster's Main Street, Lily's Mexican Market sells Virgin of Guadalupe statues, sacks of dried beans and paddle-shaped cactus leaves. A mile away, the aisles of Las Palmeras grocery store are stocked with Salvadoran cheeses and pastries. A nearby Catholic church draws more than 200 people to a Spanish Mass each Sunday. Mexican and Central American immigrants have flocked to Carroll County over the past decade, drawn by pastures and orchards that remind them of the rural villages in which they were raised.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
When Jisoo Choi moved to the United States from South Korea at the age of 6, all she knew of the English language was the alphabet. But this week Choi, a 13-year-old eighth-grader at Burleigh Manor Middle School, was honored as the winner of the Letters about Literature national writing contest, which asks students in grades four through 12 to write to an author of a book - living or dead - about how the work changed their perspective on themselves or...
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | August 21, 2003
IMMIGRATION AND language are once again stealing center stage in California politics. The state, which is home to the largest Hispanic population in the country, is also the birthplace of national movements to make English the official language, to eliminate bilingual education and to cut off benefits to illegal immigrants. Now, Arnold Schwarzenegger finds himself in the midst of a brewing controversy about his positions on both language and immigration, which could turn into key issues in the campaign for governor.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | January 7, 2008
Elizabeth Julian White, a retired high school teacher, died of age-related illness Dec. 30 at her home in Baltimore. She was 96. Born in Montgomery, Ala., Mrs. White moved, when a young child, with her parents and five siblings to Greencastle, Ind. She graduated from DePauw University - as did all her siblings - where she studied modern languages and was a member of the swim team. She later earned master's degrees in Romance languages from Indiana University and English from New York University.
NEWS
May 17, 1998
"If we do a good job K through two, we'll find we'll have readers... We really must put these foundation skills in place first."-- Searetha Smith, the Baltimore school system's chief academic officer, on the school board's decision to adopt a phonics-based reading instruction program through the second grade to give beginning readers a strong grounding in the mechanics of the English language.Pub Date: 5/17/98
NEWS
November 18, 2010
The article "Plan to revamp schools" (Nov. 17) provided a profile of not only the poor performance of many city schools but also insights into why some of the problems exist — namely, the plans to provide special programs for the "growing international population" and to strengthen English for Speakers of Other Languages programs. One of the poor performing schools cited, Patterson High, happens to be my alma mater. In the '60s when I attended, the community had its fair share of immigrants who did not arrive in the U.S. fluent in the English language.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Radhika Sule, who sells freshly prepared Indian food under the Rustic Gourmet banner at area farmers' markets, confirms that she'll be moving into the Soup's On space on the Avenue in Hampden. The opening date is planned for Aug. 15. Sule says that the storefront cafe will operate under a new name -- The Verandah . I told Sule that "veranda" -- from the Urdu or Hindi, acrcording to Merriam-Webster -- was one of the prettiest words in the English language. She said that's why she chose it.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
I am deeply concerned about the schools' plan to stop teaching cursive writing. What other parts of the curriculum will be removed from the classroom? Will the English language be next? I am appalled at the many grammatical errors I hear daily on TV and in conversations. Maybe this is another step backward to the caveman days when we will be communicating with grunts and groans. Cursive writing does not take long to master - it just takes practice, which children seem to enjoy, and it helps develop fine motor coordination.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Ammon Shea performed a feat of nerdish athleticism, reading the entire Oxford English Dictionary , and then wrote a charming book about the experience .  He has written other books on language as well. It's a dangerous thing to publish a book, particularly about language; it attracts attention. And Mr. Shea got some. We'll let him explain: "I began to receive a large number of letters from concerned citizens who felt that I was contributing to the decline of the English language.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why. Last week Tom Chivers wrote about English grammar at The Telegraph , patiently explaining why a good deal of what has been taught about grammar is unsound and what linguists, Geoffrey Pullum in particular, have discovered in examining how we speak and write. ( "Are grammar Nazis ruining the English language?" was an unfortunate headline, overstating the case and using the inflammatory Nazi , but we'll pass on.)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Writing at Sentence First   Stan Carey looks at some short works by Robert Burchfield the philologist/lexicographer who worked on the Oxford English Dictionary  and produced an updated edition of Fowler's Modern English Usage .  He concludes by quoting a short passage that you may want to post above your desk as a corrective to the ill-informed crotchets of viewers-with-alarm who imagine that this word, or that usage, or...
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
In a charming book by David and Hilary Crystal about sites in Britain important in the history of the English language,* there is a passage on Dryden and Swift and the eternally recurring and eternally hopeless call for an academy to regulate the English language.  It cropped up recently as a project of the Queen's English Society, an outfit that collapsed from its own futility. (Though it did afford me a little fun in imagining its proceedings .) The Crystals explain succinctly why nothing has ever come of the idea:  "It was Dr. Johnson who identified the fundamental flaw in the proposal.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
In 1926, H.W. Fowler offered a suggestion about making the English language a little tidier. In examining the various and inconsistent manifestations of the relative pronouns that , which , and who , he wrote that "perhaps the line of improvement lies in clearer differentiation between that & which . "  That suggestion, in the first edition of Modern English Usage , has ossified into a Rule among American editors....
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Pray consider this sentence from one of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe murder mysteries: "Everyone has something they don't want anyone to see; that is one of the functions of a home, to provide a spot to keep such things. "  I offer it not as a response to the specious argument that if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear from the National Security Agency's surveillance,* but rather to consider it as further evidence for singular they . To my mind, it carries more weight than Jane Austen's every body ... they .  The first reason is that it appears in The Red Box , published in 1936.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
I loved Paula Simon's recent commentary on the phrase "No problem" ("The problem with 'no problem,'" Jan. 25). My own pet peeve regards the grammatically incorrect response of "good" when someone asks "how are you?" This response is pervasive even among educated people. The dictionary makes it quite clear that a response of "good" is appropriate in many instances but never when conveying one's well-being. Unfortunately, I sense that the correct response - "fine, thank you" - is a thing of the past, as the English language continues to be slaughtered.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 26, 1997
Dust-jacket copy and some reviewers have begun to characterize Karen Elizabeth Gordon's books as "cult classics." I am not by nature a proselytizer, but I believe literacy as a state of being, and delight as a condition of life, would both be vastly amplified if that cult became a major denomination of faith.Gordon understands and delights in the workings, mechanisms and proprieties of the English language and writes about them with authority. Most impressively, she writes with wit and energy and erudition that are irresistible.
EXPLORE
October 20, 2012
The Board of County Commissioners will hold its public hearing on Tuesday, Oct. 30, regarding the proposal to designate English as the official language of Carroll County. The hearing will be held at 7 p.m. at the New Windsor Community Building, Community Meeting Room, 1100 Green Valley Road, New Windsor. This ordinance, if passed, would recognize English as the language in which all official county business will be conducted. The ordinance, as proposed, can be read HERE Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement that it would "ensure that all official county business is conducted in English, which will save the county money, simplify county communications and provide incentives to learn English to those living in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Amid the quaint brick storefronts of Westminster's Main Street, Lily's Mexican Market sells Virgin of Guadalupe statues, sacks of dried beans and paddle-shaped cactus leaves. A mile away, the aisles of Las Palmeras grocery store are stocked with Salvadoran cheeses and pastries. A nearby Catholic church draws more than 200 people to a Spanish Mass each Sunday. Mexican and Central American immigrants have flocked to Carroll County over the past decade, drawn by pastures and orchards that remind them of the rural villages in which they were raised.
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