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By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1992
Three and a half centuries have passed since England's countryside erupted in the bloody civil war that cost 1 in 20 Englishmen his life. Throughout 1992 and into 1993, exhibits and events throughout England will recall that troubled time, marking the 350th anniversary of the war's outbreak."
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Today they endure climbing children and have bicycles chained to them, but the cannons that flank Patterson Park's Pagoda were used in wars as much as 350 years ago, park officials have found. A cannon expert surveyed the seven historic weapons last fall and will soon undertake their restoration after finding they aren't just reproductions, as many had thought in the century since they were installed to commemorate the War of 1812 centennial. Some were likely used in the Battle of Baltimore, on land or sea, and in the Revolutionary War - or earlier.
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NEWS
October 18, 2004
Conrad Russell, 67, a liberal historian and politician, died Thursday in London after a long illness. Mr. Russell - son of the philosopher Bertrand Russell - represented the Liberal Democrats party in Parliament. Conrad Russell, who had been estranged from his father for many years, gained a reputation as a defender of the disenfranchised. In 1997, he admonished Prime Minister Tony Blair for saying he never gave money to beggars. Mr. Russell also taught history at Yale University and the University of London, specializing in the 17th century and the English Civil War. He wrote several books, including The Causes of the English Civil War and The Fall of the British Monarchies.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: LATITUDINARIAN The original Latitudinarians were Church of England divines during the reign of Charles II. With the destruction of the English Civil War and attendant religious disputes fresh in memory, they were disposed to be indulgent of differing religious views.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: LATITUDINARIAN The original Latitudinarians were Church of England divines during the reign of Charles II. With the destruction of the English Civil War and attendant religious disputes fresh in memory, they were disposed to be indulgent of differing religious views.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | October 10, 1993
A weekend of varied activities is ahead for daytrippers. Begin at Maryland's original settlement at Historic St. Mary's City, where 17th-century re-enactment units from all over the East Coast will gather for the Grand Militia Muster on Saturday and next Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.St. Maries Citty Militia, the settlement's own living history militia group, will act as host for the muster, which is the largest %J gathering of its kind. It includes units from the English Civil War Society, the James Fort Militia from Jamestown, Va., and contingents representing units from the English Civil War. Each unit will set up camp in the fields around the old State House and compete with other groups in pike, musket drill, swordplay, camp cooking and historic costuming.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Today they endure climbing children and have bicycles chained to them, but the cannons that flank Patterson Park's Pagoda were used in wars as much as 350 years ago, park officials have found. A cannon expert surveyed the seven historic weapons last fall and will soon undertake their restoration after finding they aren't just reproductions, as many had thought in the century since they were installed to commemorate the War of 1812 centennial. Some were likely used in the Battle of Baltimore, on land or sea, and in the Revolutionary War - or earlier.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
KATHI REYNOLDS, a professional dressmaker, is deluged with calls from customers seeking original creations for the galas on their social calendars. But unlike most designers, who might pull out the latest copy of Vogue for ideas, Reynolds turns to something like "Costume in Detail: Women's Dress 1730-1930."Reynolds' specialty is vintage clothing, particularly the styles of the 18th and 19th centuries. Her customers are museums and historic sites, tour guides and individuals who participate in historic re-enactments.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
Reflecting religious and political tensions back in England, a Puritans vs. Catholics bloody clash played out in the Battle of the Severn of March 25, 1655. Present-day Annapolis was then a Puritan settlement called Providence. The settlers had come from Virginia, where they faced religious persecution, They were on the ourside circle of Oliver Cromwell's fearsome Roundheads force, which had recently beheaded the English king, Charles I. The Puritan Cromwell reigned over England as lord protector in the 1650s.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
English Civil War tensions in the mother country played out in a furious skirmish between Colonial Puritans and Catholics in present-day Annapolis, a rumble known as the Battle of the Severn. On or about March 20, 1655, a band of 130 Catholic men, led by a governor, William Stone, and other officers sworn to serve Lord Baltimore set sail from St. Mary's City up the Chesapeake Bay. Their objective was to quell a settlement of Puritans, who had recently come to Maryland and founded a village named Providence.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
Reflecting religious and political tensions back in England, a Puritans vs. Catholics bloody clash played out in the Battle of the Severn of March 25, 1655. Present-day Annapolis was then a Puritan settlement called Providence. The settlers had come from Virginia, where they faced religious persecution, They were on the ourside circle of Oliver Cromwell's fearsome Roundheads force, which had recently beheaded the English king, Charles I. The Puritan Cromwell reigned over England as lord protector in the 1650s.
NEWS
October 18, 2004
Conrad Russell, 67, a liberal historian and politician, died Thursday in London after a long illness. Mr. Russell - son of the philosopher Bertrand Russell - represented the Liberal Democrats party in Parliament. Conrad Russell, who had been estranged from his father for many years, gained a reputation as a defender of the disenfranchised. In 1997, he admonished Prime Minister Tony Blair for saying he never gave money to beggars. Mr. Russell also taught history at Yale University and the University of London, specializing in the 17th century and the English Civil War. He wrote several books, including The Causes of the English Civil War and The Fall of the British Monarchies.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | October 10, 1993
A weekend of varied activities is ahead for daytrippers. Begin at Maryland's original settlement at Historic St. Mary's City, where 17th-century re-enactment units from all over the East Coast will gather for the Grand Militia Muster on Saturday and next Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.St. Maries Citty Militia, the settlement's own living history militia group, will act as host for the muster, which is the largest %J gathering of its kind. It includes units from the English Civil War Society, the James Fort Militia from Jamestown, Va., and contingents representing units from the English Civil War. Each unit will set up camp in the fields around the old State House and compete with other groups in pike, musket drill, swordplay, camp cooking and historic costuming.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1992
Three and a half centuries have passed since England's countryside erupted in the bloody civil war that cost 1 in 20 Englishmen his life. Throughout 1992 and into 1993, exhibits and events throughout England will recall that troubled time, marking the 350th anniversary of the war's outbreak."
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
KATHI REYNOLDS, a professional dressmaker, is deluged with calls from customers seeking original creations for the galas on their social calendars. But unlike most designers, who might pull out the latest copy of Vogue for ideas, Reynolds turns to something like "Costume in Detail: Women's Dress 1730-1930."Reynolds' specialty is vintage clothing, particularly the styles of the 18th and 19th centuries. Her customers are museums and historic sites, tour guides and individuals who participate in historic re-enactments.
FEATURES
October 16, 1994
The Grand Militia Muster at Historic St. Mary's City Oct. 22-23 brings 17th-century re-enactment units from all over the East Coast. The units, which include groups representing the English Civil War and the James Fort Militia, will show their skills in pike drill, crossbow, swordplay and camp cooking on Governor's Field.Admission is $6.50 for adults; $6 for seniors and students 13 to 18; $3.25 for ages 6 to 12. Historic St. Mary's City is on Route 5 in Southern Maryland. Call (301) 862-0990.
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