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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1994
FOLKESTONE, England -- The sprawling complexity of ramps, rails, roadways bridges and platforms at the British end of the Channel Tunnel awaits traffic in faintly ghostlike suspense under a thin fog rolling in from the sea.Queen Elizabeth II of Britain and President Francois Mitterrand of France will be here Friday to celebrate the opening of the "Chunnel" and the connection of Britain and Europe for the first time in an ice age.The moment will mark the...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Thomas C. Gillmer, a noted naval architect and ship historian who designed both Prides of Baltimore, the schooner Lady Maryland and other period replica vessels, died of complications from dementia Dec. 16 at the Hospice of the Chesapeake's Mandarin House in Harwood. He was 98. Mr. Gillmer was born and raised in Warren, Ohio, not far from Lake Erie, where as a youngster he fell in love with boats and the water. "I first made model boats when I was a kid. I had a friend, an older fellow, who was from Down East, somewhere in Nova Scotia.
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NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 13, 2006
Joel Larson was a sophomore, sitting in a Naval Academy history class, when his professor offhandedly mentioned that some people, for whatever reason, are inspired to swim across the English Channel. And with the nonchalance that others might have when deciding whether to go to the movies or eat a bologna sandwich, Larson thought to himself: Why couldn't I do that? As it happens, he could. Last month, he swam the 21-mile- wide Strait of Dover, the narrowest passageway in the waterway separating England and France, apparently making him the first midshipman to swim across the channel.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 12, 2008
14 injured in train fire under English Channel COQUELLES, France: A fire broke out yesterday on a train carrying trucks under the English Channel between England and France, injuring 14 people and shutting down traffic in the underwater rail tunnel, officials said. About 100 firefighters from both sides of the channel got the blaze under control, but it was not entirely extinguished hours later, said Georges Bos, a spokesman for France's Pas-de-Calais region, which was handling the emergency response.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 1999
FOLKESTONE, England -- Vietnam took Eugene Roberts' legs, but not his competitive heart.He's a groundbreaking marathoner and swimmer, a 53-year-old grandfather from the Baltimore area who refuses to let age or circumstances prevent him from realizing his dreams.His enduring goal is as crystal clear as the French coast that lies some 21 miles across a cool, salty and historic body of water.He wants to swim across the English Channel.Perhaps as early as tomorrow, Gene Roberts will plunge into the chilly water near the white cliffs of Dover in his third attempt to swim the English Channel and land on the sandy beaches of Cap Gris-Nez in France.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
Florence Chadwick, 76, a swimmer who set a women's record for crossing the English Channel in 1950, died Wednesday in San Diego.
NEWS
June 4, 1999
Nathan S. Ancell, 90, co-founder of the Ethan Allen furniture company and pioneer of the concept of selling furniture in room-style settings, died Monday at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. Mr. Ancell and his brother-in-law, Theodore Baumritter, started their company in the 1930s in Beecher Falls, Vt., out of a bankrupt furniture factory. Its headquarters eventually moved to Danbury, Conn.Vaclav Benda, 52, a Czech senator, mathematician, philosopher and former anti-communist dissident, died yesterday in Prague, Czech Republic, the news agency CTK reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and By Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
The Crossing, by Kathy Watson. Putnam. 256 pages, $22.95. "I now think long-distance swimmers are the most well-balanced people I've ever met," Kathy Watson, a former BBC radio producer writes in the opening pages of her entertaining, cautionary biography of Matthew Webb, who in 1875 became the first person to swim the English Channel. "It's a sport that brings you face-to-face with your deepest self; you can't spend that much time alone, in that silent universe, without acquiring self-knowledge."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1990
FOLKESTONE, England -- At 11:21 a.m. yesterday, Robert Graham Fagg of Dover climbed through a 3-foot by 4-foot hole in a wall of chalk marl 130 feet below the seabed of the English Channel, shook the hand of Phillippe Cozette of Calais and shouted: "Vive la France."The English and French construction workers then hugged each other as a crowd of 100 onlookers cheered, celebrating the breakthrough of the channel tunnel -- known as the Chunnel -- which joined Britain to the European continent.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 25, 1999
FOLKESTONE, England -- Imagine swimming two miles through salty water as smooth as glass, of looking up and seeing the coast of France in the distance, of drawing ever closer to a dream that has been with you for decades.And then, the boat that is supposed to follow your every stroke on a route across the English Channel encounters engine trouble and begins to drift, and the swim of a lifetime is called off for eight hours.And you have to start again eight hours later. From the beginning.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | September 25, 2006
It's one full lap, as swimming goes: England to France and back. A 42-mile odyssey fraught with freighters, fog and frigid waters. Why swim the English Channel? "Because it feels good when you stop," Andy Grannell said. Grannell, 59, was part of a six-person relay team that combined to crisscross the channel earlier this month. Each swam an hour at a time. All are members of the Arundel Olympic Swim Center in Annapolis, where they planned the feat. Crossing from Britain to France is considered the grail of aquaculture, said team member Annette Holmgren, 41, of Chester.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 13, 2006
Joel Larson was a sophomore, sitting in a Naval Academy history class, when his professor offhandedly mentioned that some people, for whatever reason, are inspired to swim across the English Channel. And with the nonchalance that others might have when deciding whether to go to the movies or eat a bologna sandwich, Larson thought to himself: Why couldn't I do that? As it happens, he could. Last month, he swam the 21-mile- wide Strait of Dover, the narrowest passageway in the waterway separating England and France, apparently making him the first midshipman to swim across the channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and By Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
The Crossing, by Kathy Watson. Putnam. 256 pages, $22.95. "I now think long-distance swimmers are the most well-balanced people I've ever met," Kathy Watson, a former BBC radio producer writes in the opening pages of her entertaining, cautionary biography of Matthew Webb, who in 1875 became the first person to swim the English Channel. "It's a sport that brings you face-to-face with your deepest self; you can't spend that much time alone, in that silent universe, without acquiring self-knowledge."
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 7, 2001
INTO THE USUAL lunchtime din Tuesday at Sabatino's Restaurant in Little Italy, Joe Pizza shuffled, and all small talk ceased. Tell 'em what you remember, somebody called out. Tell 'em what it was like 57 years ago this week. Nobody needed a calendar to check the reference. Pizza was there in the Normandy invasion, June of '44, one of the boys who hit the beach when the Allies finally clawed their way into Europe and changed the course of history. He'd landed in England only a few months earlier.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2001
IN MANY ways, Eugene Roberts is like any other runner into his sport. He loves talking about its nuances to anyone who will listen. He reads running magazines, talks excitedly about things such as finding the right inserts for his shoes, decreasing his time on his training runs, the importance of tapering off on mileage before a big race. Part of his enthusiasm, surely, is that he's a reborn runner, having taken up the sport again not quite two years ago after nearly 35 years away from it. A former schoolboy cross-country runner, he now runs around his neighborhood, competes in races from 5Ks to half-marathons, does track intervals and hasn't ruled out taking part in this fall's inaugural Baltimore Marathon.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 25, 1999
FOLKESTONE, England -- Imagine swimming two miles through salty water as smooth as glass, of looking up and seeing the coast of France in the distance, of drawing ever closer to a dream that has been with you for decades.And then, the boat that is supposed to follow your every stroke on a route across the English Channel encounters engine trouble and begins to drift, and the swim of a lifetime is called off for eight hours.And you have to start again eight hours later. From the beginning.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 12, 2008
14 injured in train fire under English Channel COQUELLES, France: A fire broke out yesterday on a train carrying trucks under the English Channel between England and France, injuring 14 people and shutting down traffic in the underwater rail tunnel, officials said. About 100 firefighters from both sides of the channel got the blaze under control, but it was not entirely extinguished hours later, said Georges Bos, a spokesman for France's Pas-de-Calais region, which was handling the emergency response.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 7, 2001
INTO THE USUAL lunchtime din Tuesday at Sabatino's Restaurant in Little Italy, Joe Pizza shuffled, and all small talk ceased. Tell 'em what you remember, somebody called out. Tell 'em what it was like 57 years ago this week. Nobody needed a calendar to check the reference. Pizza was there in the Normandy invasion, June of '44, one of the boys who hit the beach when the Allies finally clawed their way into Europe and changed the course of history. He'd landed in England only a few months earlier.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 1999
FOLKESTONE, England -- Vietnam took Eugene Roberts' legs, but not his competitive heart.He's a groundbreaking marathoner and swimmer, a 53-year-old grandfather from the Baltimore area who refuses to let age or circumstances prevent him from realizing his dreams.His enduring goal is as crystal clear as the French coast that lies some 21 miles across a cool, salty and historic body of water.He wants to swim across the English Channel.Perhaps as early as tomorrow, Gene Roberts will plunge into the chilly water near the white cliffs of Dover in his third attempt to swim the English Channel and land on the sandy beaches of Cap Gris-Nez in France.
NEWS
June 4, 1999
Nathan S. Ancell, 90, co-founder of the Ethan Allen furniture company and pioneer of the concept of selling furniture in room-style settings, died Monday at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. Mr. Ancell and his brother-in-law, Theodore Baumritter, started their company in the 1930s in Beecher Falls, Vt., out of a bankrupt furniture factory. Its headquarters eventually moved to Danbury, Conn.Vaclav Benda, 52, a Czech senator, mathematician, philosopher and former anti-communist dissident, died yesterday in Prague, Czech Republic, the news agency CTK reported.
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