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NEWS
January 17, 2012
You can hear, in the dispute about singular they and other issues of grammar and usage, a complaint that a usage objected to is not logical. For example, the objection to the double negative is that two negatives make a positive. In mathematics, yes. But step up, you two-negatives-make-a positive people. I want to hear you say that the first time you heard Jagger sing “I can't get no satisfaction,” you understood him to mean “I'm satisfied.” At the Geoffrey Pullum post on singular they at Lingua Franca that I wrote about yesterday, a copy editor writing as odarp thought he could put Professor Pullum on the spot, asking, “If 'they' can be singular, why does it always take a plural verb?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-enclosed Dance Cube jutting from the structure; views of the downtown Baltimore skyline from upper floors. Phase one of the project was finished two years ago; phase two wrapped up in time for this week's start of UMBC's academic year. The $160 million, environmentally conscious edifice brings together under one roof (painted white for maximum reflection and energy savings)
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NEWS
February 28, 2010
Deborah Kent, director of the Howard Community College Music Department, explores the eclectic world of vocal music in English with pianist David Wasser and cellist Benjamin Myers in this concert with music by Argento, Barber, Bolcom, Britten, Bernstein and Copland. Program takes place at 4 p.m. today in the Monteabaro Recital Hall, Horowitz Visual and performing Arts Center, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway. Tickets are $5-$15. Call 410-772-4900.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Bernard I.H. "Bernie" Kramer, a retired Baltimore public school vice principal who earlier had been an English department head and reading teacher, died Aug. 14 at Autumn Ridge Nursing Center in Pikesville of complications from a stroke. He was 92. The son of Harry Krasner, a plasterer, and Vivian Levita Krasner, Bernard Herman Krasner was born in Pruzhany, Poland, which is now part of Belarus. He was 4 when he and his family left Poland and arrived at Ellis Island in New York Harbor.
NEWS
November 15, 2009
If English is not your first language, practice speaking and understanding English in a group setting at 9:30 a.m. Mondays and 7:30 p.m. Thursdays at Howard County Library's East Columbia branch, 6600 Cradlerock Way. Those interested must register with the library before attending first meeting. Call 410-313-7700.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
St. Mary's ESL program needs volunteers to teach English one night a week from January through May, 7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings at St. Mary's High School, 109 Duke of Gloucester St., Annapolis. Teaching materials are provided. Registration for the classes will be at 7 p.m. Jan. 5 at the school. Call Eneida Green at 410-800-4717 or e-mail eneida_green@yahoo.com.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
At Johnson , C.S.W. examines that odd form of English peculiar to newspapers, journalese . "Newspapers rarely, if ever, report the facts in the way you would in conversation," he comments, and anyone who knows Paula LaRocque's classic "In a surprise move ... " understands just how far apart ordinary English conversation and the stilted, formulaic lingo of newspapers have drifted. C.S.W. writes about the British form of journalese, which you can see from The Economist 's style guide differs in many particulars from the American.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Joel R. Bailey, a longtime Baltimore County public school English teacher who also coached basketball, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 77. "The first thing, Joel really liked his students. ... He enjoyed interacting with them. He was a gentleman," said William L. McIntyre, who grew up with and attended elementary, middle and high schools with Mr. Bailey. "He was the same way in basketball. He was a good teaching coach. He communicated well with his students and he respected them, and they respected him," said Mr. McIntyre, a retired Eastern Technical High School social studies teacher.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
The Carroll County commissioners who want to make English the official language of the county forget that German was spoken in the county as much as English during its first hundred years or so ("Carroll commissioners might make English official language," Sept. 26). Also, after the Native American languages, Spanish was the first language in the continental U.S. I don't like the racist posturing. MaryAnn H. Gregory, Westminster
NEWS
August 7, 2005
On August 4, 2005, MARION ENGLISH. Beloved wife of the late Dwight Alvin English; loving mother of Jane Patricia English-Kligys, Charles R. English, Dwight A. English and June A. English. Also survived by four grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Funeral from the Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex at route 702 (beltway exit 36), on Monday at 8:30 A.M. Mass of Christian Burial at 9 A.M. in Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church. Interment Gardens of Faith. Visitation Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Earlier today, before I turned her off in mid-sentence, a pleasant woman on the radio who was trying not to sound bigoted was saying that immigrants in her family from Norway and Poland and elsewhere didn't arrive in this country expecting everyone to be able to speak Norwegian or Polish ...  Robert Lane Grreen, writing in The Economist 's Johnson  blog , points out, " In the traditional story, immigrants back in the good...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 2, 2014
Jermin Laviera, an energetic woman with a bright and generous smile, works on the first floor of the Esperanza Center in Southeast Baltimore, which gives her a street-level perspective on the immigrant crisis emanating hundreds of miles away in Central America. Just about every day, undocumented immigrants — parents with children, children without parents — walk through Esperanza's front door on South Broadway. They all need help, and they all have stories — often ugly ones.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
And you can't make this stuff up.  On Language Log  today there is a link to an article in The Salt Lake Tribune  on the firing of an instructor at a school teaching English as a second language. Tim Torkildson says that his boss at Nomen Global Language Center, Clarke Woodger, discharged him for writing a blog post on homophones. The explanation Mr. Torkildson says Mr. Woodger gave: "Now our school is going to be associated with homosexuality. " Having worked with bosses who assumed that everyone else was a dumb as they were, I have no difficulty crediting this account.  A commenter at Language Log  wonders whether English might prove to have a larger number of homophones.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
You go to work with the language you have, not the language you want.  The Fowler brothers thought that English would be tidier if we used that to introduce restrictive clauses and which  to introduce nonrestrictive clauses. Prescriptivists have seized on that suggestion and persuaded many editors and some writers that it is a Rule rather than a recommendation or pious hope.  The redoubtable Kory Stamper, in one of her excellent Merriam-Webster videos on usage , explains that merely thinking it's a rule does not make it one. Similarly, before you start to peeve about what a Wicked Thing the passive voice is, you might want to take the time to look at how frequently you use passive constructions yourself.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Patricia Dixon Johnson, a retired teacher and educational volunteer, died of heart failure Monday at Roland Park Place. She was 90 and had lived in Phoenix in Baltimore County. Born Patricia Mary Coles in Seattle, she was the daughter of Norman E. Coles, a construction business owner, and Franc Delong Coles, an assistant to the engineering dean at the University of California at Los Angeles. She earned a bachelor's degree at the University of California at Los Angeles in 1944 and then joined the Cadet Nurse Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
On my way to class one day at Michigan State, I encountered Roger Meiners, in whose class I had studied Roethke, Lowell, Berryman, and Jarrell. I asked him where he was headed, and he said, "I'm off to teach "Prufrock" for the twelfth time. " Beat. "When are they ever going to figure it out?" I get the same feeling as I write this blog. After trying to establish, patiently and thoroughly, for dozens of times a sensible understanding about English usage, there is always someone for whom the demolition of some usage superstition is big, unsettling news.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Philip X. "Phil" Kaltenbach, a former high school English teacher who later became an expert in the field of collectible comic books, died Tuesday at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla., while recovering from foot surgery. He was 63. The son of a Loyola University Maryland dean and a Loyola Blakefield High School administrative assistant, Philip Xavier Kaltenbach was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. Mr. Kaltenbach was a 1967 graduate of Loyola Blakefield and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
When Sarah Suskind, 18, stopped by Long Reach High School with her mother, Shelly, on Thursday morning, she thought they were there to pick up a copy of her high school transcript. Instead, a secretary directed Suskind, a recent graduate, down the hall to the principal's office. Visibly confused, Suskind entered the office to find not the principal but her father, Steve Suskind, brother Spencer, Long Reach Assistant Principal Sam Richman, Howard County Public School System Chief of Staff Susan Mascaro and - perhaps strangest of all - Amy Colman, one of her elementary school teachers.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A recent article at Slate  by Gretchen McCulloch, "Why Do You Think You're Right About Language? You're Not,"  prompts some fruitful thinking about idiolects.  An idiolect is " not just vocabulary; it's everything from how we pronounce certain words to how we put them together to what we imagine they mean. " It's the whole set of associations from regional origins, family habits of language, education, reading, and jobs.  And English, the macro language, is the sum total of all our respective idiolects; it's crowdsourced.
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