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NEWS
May 12, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake keeps saying that retaining wall that collapsed on 26 t h Street was tested a year ago and declared sound ( "City officials still unclear on responsibility for railroad landslide ," May 7). But just because they said it was sound doesn't mean that it was. Apparently the engineers were mistaken. Just because they are employed does not mean that they are good at their jobs. Apparently they are not good at their jobs. Therefore, instead of sticking behind engineers who were demonstrably wrong, maybe, a mayor in a leadership position should fire the mistaken engineers and hire better ones instead of denying reality to cover up the issue.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Peter John Vogelberger Jr., a retired nuclear engineer and past president of Teledyne Energy Systems who headed the development of devices used in 1970s space exploration, died of undetermined causes Sept. 7 at his Lutherville home. He was 82. Born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Peter J. Vogelberger Sr. and the former Agnes Snyderwine. A standout high school athlete, he was recruited to the Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Class of 1954 and was an honors graduate.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
The delicate craft was airborne for just 4.2 seconds, but it was enough to earn engineering students at the University of Maryland's Clark School of Engineering two world records for human-powered helicopter flight. The National Aeronautic Association, which observed the flight, has certified that UM biology student and bicycle racer Judy Wexler pedaled the four-rotor Gamera into the air on May 12 in a gym at the Comcast Center. It was the final attempt in two days of tests. The NAA said the brief flight established the U.S. national duration records for both human-powered helicopter flight, and for human-powered helicopter flight by a female pilot.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
James T. Lanier, an electrical engineer and devoted Clemson University football fan, died Sunday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of brain cancer. He was 60. James Taylor Lanier was born in Sylacauga, Ala., and was raised in Copperhill, Tenn., where he graduated in 1972 from Copper Basin High School. In 1977, he earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Clemson and later received a master's degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
A recent editorial stated that "The whole nation was metaphorically holding its breath last week as Hurricane Isaac bore down on New Orleans, almost seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina destroyed large parts of the city" ("We built that," Sept. 3). The fact of the matter is that the flooding of New Orleans was overwhelmingly the fault of the Army Corps of Engineers - who were solely responsible for designing and building the levee system they knew to be flawed - not the hurricane itself.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers furloughed 45 employees, closed its regulatory offices and suspended the review of pending permit applications after running out of funds, a spokesman said Tuesday. Spokesman Chris Augsburger said the district, which makes permit decisions on projects that affect wetlands and waters, had enough funding to continue operations until Tuesday. Now, he said, its review of permit applications has been suspended until new funding becomes available.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office.The parent union has "taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens over the phone to the news of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Groups of sixth-graders at Linthicum Elementary School pushed and pulled toothpicks and marshmallows yesterday, trying to build a bridge that would support a box of pennies and resist the urge to eat the marshmallows at the same time.They were among students throughout the county getting a glimpse of life as an engineer as part of Discover E program, started in 1990 by the National Society of Professional Engineers to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering.Engineers from Westinghouse have visited six schools in Anne Arundel County this year, showing students videos, conducting hands-on experiments and explaining their jobs.
NEWS
By Staff report | April 22, 1991
Whatever becomes of 1,400 surplus acres at Fort George G. Meade, Army engineers say the environment will remain unharmed.Other government agencies, naturalists and the base's Odenton neighbors will havea chance to rebut that assessment tonight.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold a 7 p.m. public hearing at Meade High School on its draft Environmental Impact Statement.The statement outlines the alternatives being considered for the 1,400 acres, which includes the 400-acre Tipton Airfield and a sanitarylandfill.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
Engineers studying the need for a general aviation airport in Howard County said last night they plan to recommend a site in about five months."The site selection process could also include a no-build option," engineer Gary M. Luczak of Timonium told a gathering of about 75 people at the county office building.The type of general aviation facility envisioned for Howard would accommodate recreational pilots and businesses using privately owned single-engine aircraft or light, twin-engine aircraft, the group was told.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Robert W. Halli Sr., a retired mechanical engineer who worked for NASA and earlier for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, died Sept. 8 at Stella Maris Hospice of heart failure. He was 100. The son of Florence Casper "Flo" Halli, a shipping clerk, and Gertrude M. Hildenbrand Halli, a homemaker, Robert William Halli Sr. was born and raised in Pittsburgh. After graduating first in his class at Central High School, he enrolled at what was then Carnegie Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1936 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Aaron C. Dutton, who walked away from a scholarship at Morehouse University to join the United States Marine Corps at the age of 17, died from stroke complications on Aug. 25. The 40-year Baltimore resident was 74. Born Aaron Coleman Dutton in September 1939 and raised in New Orleans, he was the oldest of four children to Aaron Dutton, a teacher at Dillard University, and Annabelle, a principal at Gilbert Academy. In 1954 at the age of 15, Dutton won a statewide physics contest and then received a Ford Foundation Scholarship to Morehouse College.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Maryland-based EMG merged this month with an Arizona firm, a move that adds project management services to the Hunt Valley engineering, environmental and capital planning company's capabilities. The deal with Arizona-based Quality Project Management also expands EMG's geographic reach. Together the companies have about 450 employees in 37 states, of which about 350 were part of EMG prior to the merger. "The transaction's synergies enable us to serve our clients at every stage of the real estate lifecycle, from the acquisition of portfolios and asset management to planned capital improvements and the disposition of properties," EMG CEO Claude N. Limoges said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Donald H. Seitz, a retired civil engineer who primarily spent his career with McLean Contracting Co. of Baltimore and Norfolk, Va., died Aug. 3 of heart failure at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. He was 88. The son of Henry Seitz, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer, and Leona Altvater Seitz, a homemaker, Donald Henry Seitz was born in Baltimore and raised on Hurley Avenue in the city's Gwynns Falls neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1943, Mr. Seitz immediately joined the Navy's V-5 flight program.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Are Howard County's speed limits too low or too high? That's one question some county officials hoped to answer when they reviewed a report of speed camera data from their vendor, Xerox State & Local Solutions. Traffic engineers have attempted for decades to set reasonable speed limits by analyzing traffic flow, setting the limit at the 85th percentile speed of vehicles on the road - meaning 15 percent of drivers travel faster than the limit. The thinking goes that drivers set a natural limit based on perceived risk.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby p | August 5, 1991
Engineers have some of the most exciting jobs in the world. They were involved in designing the Apollo moon rocket, building the Bay Bridge and developing Nintendo video games.But the vast majority of middle-school students in metropolitan Baltimore have little, if any, awareness of the things engineers do unless one of their parents, a relative or a neighbor is in the profession. If they think about engineers at all, it is usually to classify them as the nerds of the American work force.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office."The scumbags have taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens to the news over the phone of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Thomas D. Fantom Jr., a retired civil engineer and World War II Army Air Forces veteran, died July 23 at Arden Courts in Pikesville of complications from a fall. He was 91. The son of Thomas D. Fantom Sr., a civil engineer, and Alice E. Fantom, a homemaker, Thomas Davis Fantom Jr. was born on Palmer Avenue in the city's Pimlico neighborhood, and moved with his family to Granite during the Depression. He was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Fantom enlisted in the Army Air Forces the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.
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