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NEWS
July 25, 2003
Dorothea M. Gray, a docent at a historic Mount Vernon Place home and a gardening enthusiast, died Tuesday of a stroke at her home in the Hampton section of Towson. She was 85. Born Dorothea Bates in Baltimore, she was raised in the Forest Park area and was a 1936 graduate of Forest Park High School. She was known as Dottie. She married architect William E. Gray in 1939, and ran his Charles Street business office. Her husband died in 1987. Mrs. Gray led tours of the Engineering Society of Baltimore - the former Garrett-Jacobs mansion - and was twice president of its women's auxiliary.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
John W. Trageser Jr., a retired mechanical engineer who headed a contracting firm, died of cancer Sunday at his Lutherville home. He was 88. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John W. Trageser Sr., who owned Trageser's Cozy Inn, and the former Elizabeth Faul, who ran the family business' restaurant. Raised on Gorsuch Avenue, Mr. Trageser wrote in a memoir that he sold Christmas trees and drove an ice delivery truck as a young man. He also worked at Bethlehem Steel and at the old Albert Goetze meatpacking plant.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts | March 4, 1999
BALTIMORE'S historic Engineering Society headquarters appears to have grown a second skin this winter, as if it's trying to stay extra warm.The new outer coat consists of plastic sheets over scaffolding that has been set up for crews repairing the brownstone facade of the Mount Vernon landmark, which dates from the 1880s.The plastic wasn't attached to keep the construction crews warm, though it might have done that. It was put up to keep the building's surface temperature above 40 degrees, so restoration work could proceed when air temperatures fell below freezing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
James Joseph O'Donnell, a former Maryland transportation secretary and World War II lieutenant commander, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The former Cedarcroft resident was 95. "Jim got things done in a quiet way. He was a big help for me and was a good public servant," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes, who lives in Denton. "He was very competent and was at all times a real gentleman. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Randall Street in South Baltimore, he attended the Cathedral School and was a 1936 graduate of Loyola High School.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
Lawrence E. Lewis, an engineer who led the restoration of his profession's Mount Vernon Place clubhouse, died Sunday of brain cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 55 and lived in Lutherville. A project manager and design team leader for the state's Department of General Services, he oversaw construction of the Sweeney District Court House in Annapolis, a Towson University dormitory and the Salisbury State Student Center. He also led the conversion of the former downtown Hutzler's department store into the Saratoga State Office Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 21, 1999
The home of Baltimore's Engineering Society played host to a hot night at the fourth annual Fire Ball last Saturday. The honorary chairman, Baltimore City Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. made sure the only things fired up at the Garrett-Jacobs mansion were the party's 250 guests.Others in attendance included Fire Ball co-chairpersons Sandy Whitney Jr. and Howard Yocum; Lite 102 radio announcer Mary Anne Perry and her fiance, Greg Zenger; Garrett-Jacobs Mansion Endowment Fund president Donald Vannoy; Engineering Society president Michael P. Goodrich; Baltimore Fire PIO Hector Torres; Fox45 meteorologist Lori Pinson; ESB board members Wendell Leimbach, Richard Magnani and Kate Carus; and event committee members Mike Szimanski, Si Braverman and Marian Bollinger.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
At the turn of the century, the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion was the center of Baltimore's social scene.Now, the Engineering Society of Baltimore, which owns the building, cannot afford to repair the city's largest townhouse. So, in an effort to raise $5 million for renovations, the group announced yesterday the formation of the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion Endowment Fund."If we could bring the building up to the 20th century, it would be an economical building and a beautiful building," said Jay Hanna, the society's president.
NEWS
June 17, 2006
John Paul Landis, a retired Marine Corps officer who had a second career as a civil engineer, died of pancreatic cancer June 9 at his Arnold home. He was 71. He was born and raised in Cumberland and graduated in 1953 from Virginia Military Institute with a bachelor's degree in civil engineering. He later earned a master's degree in the same field from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a master's in administration from George Washington University. He served in the Marines - including a stint in Vietnam - from 1957 until his retirement with the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1979.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
Robert Koning, 54, who commanded merchant ships before becoming a marine surveyor in the Port of Baltimore, died Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications from cancer.A mass of Christian burial was being offered today at St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church, 3615 Harford Road.Mr. Koning had lived in the Montebello and Mount Vernon areas since settling in Baltimore in 1980. After coming here, he had worked as an inspector of ships and their cargoes, most recently for the National Cargo Bureau Inc.A native of Amsterdam and a graduate of a school for ship's officers in the Netherlands, he had been captain of ships under the Dutch andLiberian flags.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 14, 2005
An open-air courtyard off Mount Vernon Place will be enclosed under a glass and steel roof as part of a $5 million plan to increase and upgrade the meeting space at Baltimore's historic Garrett-Jacobs Mansion. The Engineering Society of Baltimore, which owns and operates the mansion at 7-11 W. Mount Vernon Place, also wants to restore several of its "period" rooms, build an addition containing an elevator, restrooms, commercial-grade kitchen and barrier-free entrance, and possibly add upper-level guest rooms.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
John H. Tierney, former head of the Travelers Insurance Co.'s Baltimore engineering department and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 24 of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 90. The son of Edward Tierney, a chauffeur, and Elizabeth Murphy Tierney, a homemaker, John Henry Tierney was born and raised in Fairfield, Conn., where he graduated in 1941 from Roger Ludlowe High School. He was a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and served in engine rooms aboard merchant marine vessels.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Richard O. Beall, a civil engineer who was a founder of Century Engineering Inc. in Hunt Valley, died Dec. 29 of cancer at his Stevenson home. He was 82. "There was no better human being than Dick Beall. He was a wonderful person who had a phenomenal love of our company that spanned more than 40 years," said Francis X. Smyth, CEO of Century Engineering. "He was loyal, committed and passionate about the business. His whole life revolved around the business. " The son of former U.S. Sen. J. Glenn Beall and Margaret Schwarzenbach Beall, a homemaker, Richard Olin Beall was born and raised in Frostburg.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2013
Thomas E. "Jud" Judkins, a retired Baltimore businessman and veteran, died Thursday of complications from an infection at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 86. The son of a steamship executive and a homemaker, Thomas Edward Judkins was born in Houston and moved in 1941 with his family to Baltimore. He attended McDonogh School and Calvert Hall College High School, and left before graduation ceremonies to enlist in the Army Air Forces. "He later was presented his high school diploma while he was in the Air Force," said his wife of 32 years, the former Carol Hughes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
William C. Farrell Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. executive, died Sept. 4 of complications from renal failure at his Annapolis home. He was 87. The son of a C&P telephone installer and a homemaker, William Charles Farrell Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Fairmount Avenue. After graduating in 1943 from Polytechnic Institute, he briefly attended the Johns Hopkins University's Whiting School of Engineering before enlisting in the Army that year. Mr. Farrell served with the Signal Corps and was initially assigned to Squire Laboratories Inc. in Revere, Mass., before completing tours of duty in Europe and Japan.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 22, 2011
David Lucien Gaudreau, a retired engineer and builder, died of congestive heart failure July 12 at his Naples, Fla., home. He was 93. Born in Braintree, Mass., he was the son of architect Lucien E.D. Gaudreau, who moved to Baltimore in the 1920s as a project architect for the construction of St. Mary's Seminary in Roland Park. Mr. Gaudreau was a 1937 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School, where he earned 10 varsity letters in football, baseball, basketball and swimming. He was named to the All-Maryland team by local sports writers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Victor Beardsley Hertslet, a retired Arundel Co. official and longtime Towson resident, died Dec. 14 in his sleep at his daughter's Potomac, Mont., home. He was 97. Mr. Hertslet, the son of a British soldier who was killed at the Battle of the Somme during World War I and a housekeeper, was born in New York City and raised in Darien, Conn. After graduating from Peekskill Military Academy in 1929, he earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1933 from Lehigh University.
NEWS
February 25, 1994
ENGINEERING SPECTACLEThe Baltimore Museum of Industry will be host to as many as 800 students this weekend, all calculating or devising solutions to engineering puzzles posed by members of the Engineering Society of Baltimore. You may watch, too -- as some 3,000 folks did a year ago.Seventy teams of students from schools throughout the state will ponder problems such as protecting a raw egg during a 6-foot trip that ends at a wall and creating a cargo plane that can fly while carrying a heavy load.
NEWS
June 15, 1993
Carl W. Watchorn, a retired electrical engineer and expert on the economics of power generating systems who had worked for a Pennsylvania utility headquartered in Baltimore, died June 8 at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. He was 93.Mr. Watchorn had lived in the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville for about seven years.He worked for the General Electric Co. and the New York Edison Co. before moving to the Baltimore area in the late 1920s to work for the Pennsylvania Water and Power Co.In 1940, he became a registered professional engineer in Maryland.
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