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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Two men were rescued from a fishing boat in Ape Hole Creek near Crisfield on Wednesday after the boat began taking on water, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The father of a man onboard the fishing boat, the Carolyn Jeanne, alerted crew members at Coast Guard Station Crisfield that the boat was sinking about 2:15 p.m., after his son called him, the Coast Guard said. The a 25-foot Coast Guard boat located the 41-foot Carolyn Jeanne near the Pocomoke Sound Wildlife Management Area about 15 minutes later and quickly made contact with the two men on board.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Two men were rescued from a fishing boat in Ape Hole Creek near Crisfield on Wednesday after the boat began taking on water, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The father of a man onboard the fishing boat, the Carolyn Jeanne, alerted crew members at Coast Guard Station Crisfield that the boat was sinking about 2:15 p.m., after his son called him, the Coast Guard said. The a 25-foot Coast Guard boat located the 41-foot Carolyn Jeanne near the Pocomoke Sound Wildlife Management Area about 15 minutes later and quickly made contact with the two men on board.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2005
When a team is struggling to find its equilibrium the way the Blast has during its injury-filled season, it needs players in what forward David Bascome calls "the engine room." The engine room is midfield. The men who play that position have to motor up and down the floor, playing defense, showing themselves to be available at midfield for an outlet or settling pass, setting up the offense and - when the occasion presents itself - finishing scoring chances of their own. Allen Eller had been doing all those things quietly for the Blast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Charles F. "Blackie" Blockston Jr., a merchant mariner who during World War II survived the U-boat sinking of the freighter Carlton and spent three weeks drifting 600 miles in a lifeboat before being rescued, died Aug. 28 of multiple-organ failure at the Veterans Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. The longtime Rosedale resident was 93. Mr. Blockston's wartime adventures began in the engine room of the SS Carlton, a Lykes Brothers Steamship Co. freighter that departed Iceland on May 20, 1942, sailing for the Soviet Arctic port of Murmansk.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Firefighters continue to investigate the cause of a Tuesday night fire involving a 270-foot long Coast Guard boat. Lt. Cliff Kooser, spokesman with the Anne Arundel County fire department, said about 47 firefighters were called at 10:32 p.m. to a dry dock in the Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard, where smoke coming from the hull of the ship. Kooser said the firefighters had to climb up four stories to get inside the boat that was in the dry dock and then travel down three floors to the third level of the main deck.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Robert Cornelius Ballinger, who became a highly regarded expert on battleship propulsion systems in a uniformed and civilian naval career spanning five decades, died of heart failure Saturday at his Annapolis home. He was 81. "Known to his colleagues as `Battleship Bob,' Robert Ballinger probably knows more about battleship boilers than anyone else around," said a 1988 profile of Mr. Ballinger in a Navy publication. A native of Bowling Green, Ky., Mr. Ballinger was raised in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 19, 2010
Joseph John Carbo, a retired merchant ship engineer who sailed around the world 14 times and later put his engine room expertise to work as a longtime volunteer aboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Sunday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime West Towson resident was 82. Mr. Carbo, who was born and raised in South Philadelphia within sight of the Delaware River and the ships steaming in and out of port, was the son of a shipbuilder and a homemaker. During World War I, his father worked at American International Shipbuilding's Hog Island shipyard, and after the war at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Leo T. Vogelsang, a retired railroader and volunteer who helped restore the SS John W. Brown, died of brain cancer Monday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The Winfield resident was 75. Mr. Vogelsang was born and raised in Southwest Baltimore and attended city public schools. He was 17 when he joined the merchant marine during World War II, and became a fireman, oiler and water tender aboard the Liberty ship SS John S. Mosby and the tanker Gulfgem. Returning to Baltimore after the war, he was employed as a dock worker for the Western Maryland Railway from 1947 until enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1950.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 1, 2011
William E. Wentworth, a retired W.R. Grace project engineer who survived the sinking of a Liberty Ship in a World War II kamikaze attack, died of cancer Jan. 22 at his Timonium home. He was 87. Born in Detroit, he moved with his parents to Carroll County and was a 1940 graduate of Hampstead High School. He later resided on Belleville Avenue and became an apprentice machinist with the old Bartlett-Hayward Co. in Southwest Baltimore before World War II. In an autobiographical sketch, Mr. Wentworth wrote that he joined the Navy as a machinist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1999
Robert F. Schwatka, a retired chief engineer who worked aboard Baltimore tugboats for nearly 40 years, died Friday of injuries sustained in a traffic accident on Interstate 81 near Christiansburg, Va. The Monkton resident was 71.Mr. Schwatka was Florida-bound when the Bluebird Motor Coach he was driving had a blowout, causing the vehicle to swerve and hit the jagged mountainside at the edge of the road. He was pronounced dead at the scene.Born in Baltimore, Mr. Schwatka's long-time love affair with the sea began as a 16-year-old growing up in Middle River.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 1, 2011
William E. Wentworth, a retired W.R. Grace project engineer who survived the sinking of a Liberty Ship in a World War II kamikaze attack, died of cancer Jan. 22 at his Timonium home. He was 87. Born in Detroit, he moved with his parents to Carroll County and was a 1940 graduate of Hampstead High School. He later resided on Belleville Avenue and became an apprentice machinist with the old Bartlett-Hayward Co. in Southwest Baltimore before World War II. In an autobiographical sketch, Mr. Wentworth wrote that he joined the Navy as a machinist.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Firefighters continue to investigate the cause of a Tuesday night fire involving a 270-foot long Coast Guard boat. Lt. Cliff Kooser, spokesman with the Anne Arundel County fire department, said about 47 firefighters were called at 10:32 p.m. to a dry dock in the Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard, where smoke coming from the hull of the ship. Kooser said the firefighters had to climb up four stories to get inside the boat that was in the dry dock and then travel down three floors to the third level of the main deck.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 19, 2010
Joseph John Carbo, a retired merchant ship engineer who sailed around the world 14 times and later put his engine room expertise to work as a longtime volunteer aboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Sunday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime West Towson resident was 82. Mr. Carbo, who was born and raised in South Philadelphia within sight of the Delaware River and the ships steaming in and out of port, was the son of a shipbuilder and a homemaker. During World War I, his father worked at American International Shipbuilding's Hog Island shipyard, and after the war at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
DeLacy L. "Cookie" Cook, a World War II merchant mariner and retired port captain for United States Lines who later became chief engineer of the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Monday of sepsis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Lutherville resident was 85. Mr. Cook was born in Pasadena, Calif., and raised in Santa Ana, Calif., where he graduated from Santa Ana High School. "Why did I go to sea? I lived at the beach in California, spent a lot of time there growing up. I just fell into it," he told former Sun editor and John W. Brown volunteer Ernest F. Imhoff, whose book Good Shipmates chronicled the story of the reactivation in Baltimore of the World War II-era Liberty ship.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2005
When a team is struggling to find its equilibrium the way the Blast has during its injury-filled season, it needs players in what forward David Bascome calls "the engine room." The engine room is midfield. The men who play that position have to motor up and down the floor, playing defense, showing themselves to be available at midfield for an outlet or settling pass, setting up the offense and - when the occasion presents itself - finishing scoring chances of their own. Allen Eller had been doing all those things quietly for the Blast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Leo T. Vogelsang, a retired railroader and volunteer who helped restore the SS John W. Brown, died of brain cancer Monday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The Winfield resident was 75. Mr. Vogelsang was born and raised in Southwest Baltimore and attended city public schools. He was 17 when he joined the merchant marine during World War II, and became a fireman, oiler and water tender aboard the Liberty ship SS John S. Mosby and the tanker Gulfgem. Returning to Baltimore after the war, he was employed as a dock worker for the Western Maryland Railway from 1947 until enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1950.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Charles F. "Blackie" Blockston Jr., a merchant mariner who during World War II survived the U-boat sinking of the freighter Carlton and spent three weeks drifting 600 miles in a lifeboat before being rescued, died Aug. 28 of multiple-organ failure at the Veterans Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. The longtime Rosedale resident was 93. Mr. Blockston's wartime adventures began in the engine room of the SS Carlton, a Lykes Brothers Steamship Co. freighter that departed Iceland on May 20, 1942, sailing for the Soviet Arctic port of Murmansk.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Robert Cornelius Ballinger, who became a highly regarded expert on battleship propulsion systems in a uniformed and civilian naval career spanning five decades, died of heart failure Saturday at his Annapolis home. He was 81. "Known to his colleagues as `Battleship Bob,' Robert Ballinger probably knows more about battleship boilers than anyone else around," said a 1988 profile of Mr. Ballinger in a Navy publication. A native of Bowling Green, Ky., Mr. Ballinger was raised in Nashville, Tenn.
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