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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Fighting crime in Carroll County will cost taxpayers about $700,000 more next fiscal year, under proposed spending plans unveiled by law enforcement officials yesterday.Sheriff's Department officials are seeking an additional $400,000 a 9.6 percent increase over this year's $4 million -- to hire 10 correctional officers next fiscal year, which begins July 1. The officers will be needed when a 100-bed addition to the jail opens, as early as December, said warden Mason Waters.The proposed budget for sheriff services, which includes the Carroll County Detention Center, is $4.4 million.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
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NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
Vincent DeMarco, executive director of Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse, used the support of state law enforcement officials yesterday to ask Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey to reconsider the organization's gun control plan."
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 29, 2012
Next time the president asks you to be attorney general of the United States, it might be best to politely refuse the offer. My reasoning: Modern day attorneys general are regularly torched by the Congressional opposition, particularly when that opposition holds a majority in one or both chambers of Congress. Such is the context for the life and times of Attorney General Eric Holder, a movement progressive who dutifully followed the Obama administration's line when Democrats controlled Congress in 2009-10.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
U.S. Customs Service officials announced yesterday a record seizure of marijuana at the port of Baltimore, a result, they said, of heightened vigilance in the wake of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Agents seized more than 2 tons - 4,092 pounds - of the drug Monday when they inspected a container ship that was unloading 86 pieces of furniture from Mexico at Dundalk Marine Terminal. The tightly packed marijuana, valued at $4 million, was hidden in air-tight compartments that had been built into each piece.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Federal authorities and local police seized more than 150 kilograms of cocaine - valued at $4 million wholesale and as much as $40 million on the street - late Wednesday in the Baltimore area and have filed federal drug importation charges against a New York man, officials said yesterday. Law enforcement officials called the narcotics seizure one of the region's largest in recent years. "This is a huge arrest, this is a lot of drugs that are not going to reach the streets of our city," Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said at a news conference with federal authorities and other local law enforcement officials to announce the seizure.
NEWS
March 1, 1995
Increasing contacts between Howard County teen-agers and local law enforcement officials appear to be heightening old animosities. It is unfortunate to note that in the war on crime, young people are often seen as the enemy of a law-abiding public. Equally troubling is that many youths view the police in the same vein.As reported recently in The Sun, crime among juveniles in Howard County increased by 23 percent last year, with larceny and burglary growing by almost half. The report suggests that greater police enforcement has only hardened attitudes of those youths who somehow remain oblivious to the greater consequences of their actions.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
U.S. ATTORNEY Thomas M. DiBiagio is making more bizarre news. In addition to announcing that he has found more pressing prosecutorial business than gun crimes in Baltimore City, he has now told the local Criminal Justice Coordinating Council that it is not "the appropriate venue to discuss what role federal law enforcement should play in addressing Baltimore City's violent crime problem." Huh? "I believe that the most effective way to coordinate this effort is to engage in these discussions with ... local law enforcement officials," Mr. DiBiagio wrote in a letter.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
It is not pleasant having law enforcement officials investigated by other law enforcement officials. But the alternative is worse: perhaps ignoring misconduct in office.State prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli, looking into allegations against Baltimore police or the city state's attorney's office made by a grand jury that studied narcotics investigations, may not find anything worth pursuing. But if he does file charges, it could prove devastating, especially in a city that already is fighting an uphill battle against the social cancer of drugs and the street wars it unleashes on many of its neighborhoods.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - Attorney General John Ashcroft unveiled an intelligence-sharing plan yesterday aimed at "connecting the dots" among local, state and federal law enforcement tracking terrorists. Ashcroft said the new plan would address the "single greatest structural cause" for the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York and Washington: the failure of law enforcement to share intelligence information. "Government erected a wall that segregated criminal investigators from intelligence agents, government buttressed that wall, and before Sept.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
When people pack assault rifles at presidential forums and town-hall meetings dissolve into shouting matches, it's easy to imagine such anger spilling over into the nation's simmering stew of racial prejudice. A day after a self-proclaimed white supremacist was arrested in Baltimore for attempted murder in an assault on a 76-year-old black man, law enforcement officials and politicians expressed concern Wednesday that the tenor of current politics could prompt an increase in hate crimes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - Attorney General John Ashcroft unveiled an intelligence-sharing plan yesterday aimed at "connecting the dots" among local, state and federal law enforcement tracking terrorists. Ashcroft said the new plan would address the "single greatest structural cause" for the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York and Washington: the failure of law enforcement to share intelligence information. "Government erected a wall that segregated criminal investigators from intelligence agents, government buttressed that wall, and before Sept.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Federal authorities and local police seized more than 150 kilograms of cocaine - valued at $4 million wholesale and as much as $40 million on the street - late Wednesday in the Baltimore area and have filed federal drug importation charges against a New York man, officials said yesterday. Law enforcement officials called the narcotics seizure one of the region's largest in recent years. "This is a huge arrest, this is a lot of drugs that are not going to reach the streets of our city," Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said at a news conference with federal authorities and other local law enforcement officials to announce the seizure.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 12, 2003
Daniel Gordon, former chief energy trader for Merrill Lynch & Co., is being investigated on suspicion of embezzling $43 million from the world's largest securities firm in 2000 by disguising the theft as an energy trade, according to a letter written by a U.S. Justice Department prosecutor and interviews with Canadian law enforcement officials. Merrill Lynch, based in New York, hasn't disclosed the loss in public filings. Gordon sent the money in 2000 to a Caribbean-incorporated shell company he controlled, according to the Justice Department letter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - American authorities have spotted a recent upsurge in possible terrorist threats and are warning law enforcement officials to be alert to the prospect of al-Qaida attacks in the United States and abroad as early as within several weeks, officials said yesterday. The CIA is concerned that al-Qaida "plans to launch major attacks" against Americans in the United States and in the Middle East "as early as mid-February 2003," law enforcement and intelligence officials were warned by a confidential advisory circulated this week.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | October 23, 2002
The intensity of the coverage of the sniper shootings has often blurred the difference between local news programs and national cable news channels. The best evidence: WBAL-TV dislodged the queen of afternoon television to report on yesterday's shooting. "We're pre-empting Oprah, which is a pretty big statement in its own right," says Bill Fine, president and general manager of WBAL-TV. WJZ-TV could not have initiated its new 4 p.m. news program at a better (read: worse) time. Ratings have gone up for the CBS station at that time - about 18 percent higher than WJZ drew when showing Rosie O'Donnell's talk show last year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 1995
In Thursday's editions, an article about a proposal by the Federal Bureau of Investigation for an expanded national wiretapping system misstated the number of telephone lines that the system would enable the FBI to monitor simultaneously in high-crime areas. The plan calls for monitoring one of every 1,000 phone lines.+ The Sun regrets the errors.The FBI has proposed a national wiretapping system of unprecedented size and scope that would give law enforcement officials the capacity to monitor simultaneously one out of every 100 phone lines in some high-crime areas of the country.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
U.S. ATTORNEY Thomas M. DiBiagio is making more bizarre news. In addition to announcing that he has found more pressing prosecutorial business than gun crimes in Baltimore City, he has now told the local Criminal Justice Coordinating Council that it is not "the appropriate venue to discuss what role federal law enforcement should play in addressing Baltimore City's violent crime problem." Huh? "I believe that the most effective way to coordinate this effort is to engage in these discussions with ... local law enforcement officials," Mr. DiBiagio wrote in a letter.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
U.S. Customs Service officials announced yesterday a record seizure of marijuana at the port of Baltimore, a result, they said, of heightened vigilance in the wake of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. Agents seized more than 2 tons - 4,092 pounds - of the drug Monday when they inspected a container ship that was unloading 86 pieces of furniture from Mexico at Dundalk Marine Terminal. The tightly packed marijuana, valued at $4 million, was hidden in air-tight compartments that had been built into each piece.
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