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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
The robbery would be simple, the five men were told: The crew would burst into a Baltimore hotel room and grab $400,000 worth of cocaine stashed there by an out-of-town supplier. They should bring guns, just in case. But as the men headed to the hotel, Baltimore police working with the Drug Enforcement Agency swooped in to arrest them. The entire story — the coke, the supplier and the hotel room — had been made up by law enforcement. The suspects in the supposed December robbery were charged with conspiracy to distribute drugs, robbery and gun violations.
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NEWS
March 28, 1996
Two law enforcement agencies became a little richer yesterday.U.S. Marshal George K. McKinney presented the Maryland State Police and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration with a check for $254,163.96. The money represents the proceeds from several drug investigations carried out in the state last year.Under forfeiture laws, prosecutors can seize cash, cars, boats, houses and other items used in the course of drug trafficking operations. The goods are sold and the proceeds distributed to law enforcement agencies in the region.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore police ordered every officer to work July 4 and will rely heavily on reinforcements from state law enforcement agencies, an effort intended to keep Inner Harbor visitors safe while maintaining a strong presence in areas besieged by recent violence. The city has traditionally packed downtown with officers for Independence Day celebrations like the one planned for Thursday. But this year police are also stepping up their presence in neighborhoods across the city that have been rocked by more than 40 shootings and 16 homicides since June 21. "The Inner Harbor is going to be safe on the Fourth of July," Lt. Col. Darryl DeSousa declared at a news conference DeSousa promised an "overflood" of officers downtown and said that all police districts would be at full strength, because the department has canceled leave for the holiday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 15, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's Gus Sentementes reports today on a Highlandtown company building a possible replacement rifle for the M4. The new gun could be used by the Army, as well as by municipal police in Baltimore . While most Baltimore police officers carry .40 Caliber Glock pistols, tactical officers have higher-firepower at their disposal. Gus' story on Adcor, a machine shop best known for bottling equipment, has come up with what is described as a "powerful and durable automatic rifle" that doesn't easily jam. Gus writes: Even if the Army decides to stick with the M4, [Adcor owner Jimmy]
NEWS
February 12, 1995
Police departments in Aberdeen and Bel Air will be hiring an additional officer each for community patrol with federal grants announced last week by Democratic U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes.The grants are available through the COPS FAST program, authorized by the $8.8 billion federal crime bill recently passed by Congress.The program will add 59 new officers throughout the state, the senators said in a statement released from Ms. Mikulski's headquarters.Aberdeen police will receive about $50,500 and the Bel Air department about $70,000.
NEWS
January 23, 2004
Sheriff's Office recognized by national commission The Carroll County Sheriff's Office has received a national award for meeting nearly 100 standards related to life, health and safety issues as well as legal and liability requirements. The award by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc. was presented yesterday to Carroll County Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning. The national organization's "recognition status" is needed before law enforcement agencies can seek accreditation.
NEWS
April 9, 2006
A team of assessors from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc. will visit the Howard County Police Department this month to examine its policies, procedures, management, operations and support services. Members of the community are invited to offer comments at a public information session to be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Ellicott Room of the George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive, Ellicott City. The assessment team is made up of members of law enforcement agencies in other states.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
Municipal police officers may go outside town limits when backing up other law enforcement agencies on nonemergency calls -- if the municipal governments authorize such a mutual aid policy, the state attorney general's office said.Betty Stemley Sconion, an assistant attorney general who is the principal counsel to the Maryland State Police, said state law clearly permits mutual aid between police agencies in nonemergency situations -- even under oral agreements like those between some Carroll towns and neighboring law enforcement agencies.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The White House is pressing for legislation to force telephone and cable television companies to install computer software on their networks that would enable law enforcement agencies to eavesdrop on phone calls and computer transmissions, Clinton administration officials said yesterday.The move, intended to preserve the law enforcement agencies' ability to conduct court-authorized wiretaps, is intended to overcome the difficulty of intercepting telephone conversations and other electronic transmissions in the on-off pulses of digital computer code, which is being used increasingly for everyday communications.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
Anne Arundel County police filled their void at the police chief position after just a few weeks. Baltimore should name the successor to Frederick H. Bealefeld within the new few weeks, if not days.  But for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police Department, their void at the top continues a year after Marcus Brown left to take control of the state police force. The lingering vacancy has raised questions over whether officials are contemplating a merger of the agency and other state law enforcement agencies into the state police.  State officials confirm that such a move is being contemplated, but said it has no bearing on the lack of movement on naming a permanent chief for the MdTA police.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 15, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's Gus Sentementes reports today on a Highlandtown company building a possible replacement rifle for the M4. The new gun could be used by the Army, as well as by municipal police in Baltimore . While most Baltimore police officers carry .40 Caliber Glock pistols, tactical officers have higher-firepower at their disposal. Gus' story on Adcor, a machine shop best known for bottling equipment, has come up with what is described as a "powerful and durable automatic rifle" that doesn't easily jam. Gus writes: Even if the Army decides to stick with the M4, [Adcor owner Jimmy]
EXPLORE
July 3, 2011
After years of discussion, several changes in public policy course and an election cycle where options were hotly debated — the Carroll County Sheriff's Office officially became the principal provider of law enforcement in Carroll on July 1. The move marks a phasing out of the Resident Trooper Program in Carroll, through which Maryland State Police had been the primary law enforcement agency under a contract with the county. In February of this year, a memorandum of understanding formalizing the move was signed between the Sheriff's Office, the Maryland State Police and the county's Office of Public Safety Support Services.  The agreement increases the responsibilities of the Sheriff's Office, establishes a timetable to increase staffing and provides for a transition of duties.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Sgt. Julio Valcarcel wheels his unmarked sport utility vehicle south onto U.S. 1 in Jessup as motorists whiz by in the opposite direction. The Maryland state trooper is not looking to ticket speeders, but rather is on the hunt for stolen cars. And he doesn't have to consult a "hot sheet" to compare license plate numbers, or even remember the make, model and color of vehicles on the stolen-car list. Images of license plates pop onto his laptop computer screen as the cars go by. An alarms sounds when the computer finds a stolen plate or car, or even a revoked or suspended registration, information stored in a database updated daily by the FBI and the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration.
NEWS
By Ronald Fraser | December 10, 2008
On the streets, where illegal drugs are still easy to get at affordable prices, Maryland police chiefs are losing the decades-long drug war. But many departments have come to depend on drug raids to increase their operating budgets. While the drug trade still enriches the bad guys, police chiefs now also get a piece of the action. Many states, wary of overzealous police departments, require that the proceeds from seized assets be used for education or other non-police purposes. But the 1984 federal Comprehensive Crime Control Act, a turning point in America's war on drugs, is a way to get around these state laws.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- California Attorney General Bill Lockyer released statewide statistics yesterday on 1998 hate crimes before announcing the creation of an advisory commission and a new strategy to combat the problem.Lockyer was flanked by politicians, law enforcement and civil rights leaders as he spoke at a news conference at the city's Museum of Tolerance."Whether hatemongers use gun violence, arson or other illegal means to spread their poison, we in law enforcement and communities throughout California must respond swiftly and make it clear that such behavior will not be tolerated," Lockyer said.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 29, 2001
The heads of major federal law enforcement agencies and top political leaders will meet on Capitol Hill on Wednesday to discuss strengthening anti-terrorism measures at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. Nearly 5,000 law enforcement officers from 60 local, state and federal agencies have been assigned to the Games as part of a $200 million security plan, but organizers acknowledge that may not be enough in light of the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and the Washington area.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2008
With Congress on the verge of outlining new parameters for National Security Agency eavesdropping between suspicious foreigners and Americans, lawmakers are leaving largely untouched a host of government programs that critics say involves far more domestic surveillance than the wiretaps they sought to remedy. These programs - most of them highly classified - are run by an alphabet soup of federal intelligence and law enforcement agencies. They sift, store and analyze the communications, spending habits and travel patterns of U.S. citizens, searching for suspicious activity.
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