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NEWS
January 11, 2010
All the recent emphasis on enforcing our way to a clean Bay is completely misguided. Bay water quality will continue to fall short because the bay lacks oysters -- which are nature's primary way of removing excess nutrients. Everyone contributes to bay water quality impairments. We are on the right track with the point source investments that have been made as well as expecting greater efforts from agriculture, new development and urban storm water. However, we continue to deceive ourselves if we think attainable (and sustainable)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony G. Brown | October 2, 2014
Editor's note: The Sun also plans to run an op-ed by Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan in the coming weeks.  This week, we marked the one-year anniversary of a lifesaving law taking effect, the Firearm Safety Act. But, Marylanders still stand at a crossroads between two very different futures for our state. In 2013, in response to the tragic Newtown school shooting and the all too common acts of gun violence on our own streets, we took real action to protect our communities by passing some of the toughest gun safety laws in the nation.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Ocean City will look to better enforcement to cut down on problems with rowdy visitors instead of a ban on short-term rentals, according to a city official. The vacation destination had been considering adding regulations to govern some rental properties in response to complaints from some residents, but members of the planning and zoning commission backed away from the idea Wednesday, said Blaine Smith, the assistant director of the city's Planning and Zoning Department. “They don't think there needs to be new regulation.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | April 8, 2010
Maryland is failing to ride herd on water pollution in the state because of serious funding shortfalls and its own flawed enforcement practices, according to a Washington-based think tank. The Center for Progressive Reform contends in a new report that while Maryland has some of the nation's toughest environmental laws, its enforcement of water pollution regulations is lagging. "They could do better," Robert L. Glicks- man, the report's co-author and environmental law professor at George Washington University, said of state environmental officials.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 15, 2011
If you live in Maryland and order a box of $5 stogies over the Internet this summer, you might get busted for accepting an illegal tobacco shipment. Or you might not. Comptroller Peter Franchot says he doesn't want to enforce a prohibition on Internet sales of premium cigars that took effect May 1. The ban was "an unintended consequence" of 2010 reform of wholesale tobacco commerce, he said in a letter to legislative leaders dated Monday. He asked their permission to suspend enforcement of the law until the fall, when the General Assembly meets again.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
One would think that after decades of population flight from Baltimore and the city struggling with a property tax rate over double that of the next highest municipality, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake would be highly sensitive regarding the levy of new taxes or fees. The investigation by The Sun found that for the 2012 fiscal year, Baltimore issued just under 700,000 speed camera tickets, at $40 each, generating total fines just shy of $28 million. It also found that there have been 2.5 million photo enforcement tickets issued, for a total of $100 million in fines ("Delays, detours and dead ends on cameras," Nov. 25)
EXPLORE
March 15, 2013
Police officers in three surrounding counties and the city of Laurel Police are beefing up enforcement of drunk driving this weekend, as St. Patrick's Day is celebrated on Sunday. Laurel Police will conduct a sobriety checkpoint Saturday night, March 16 at Route 1 and Main Street, weather permitting. If it's raining Saturday night, Laurel Police will conduct roving saturation patrols in area, according to Laurel City Spokesman Pete Piringer. Free rides home are available through SoberRide by calling 1-800-200-TAXI (8294)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Anne Arundel County government hasn't supported the installation of speed cameras, but beginning Friday one slice of the county will have them anyway. Annapolis is set to launch its own enforcement program, even while state legislators consider overhauling Maryland's speed camera law in the wake of troubles with the Baltimore program. The Annapolis program, approved by the City Council in November 2011, allows for three speed cameras that, by law, must operate within school zones.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
New laws passed by the Maryland General Assembly late last week would put stricter penalties and an element of public shaming behind the state's open-meetings laws. State lawmakers said public officials have been able to flout the rules without significant consequences. "It has no enforcement whatsoever," said Del. Dan Morhaim, a Baltimore County Democrat who sponsored the bill to toughen open-meetings laws. "This is the first bill that actually creates some enforcement. " Maryland's public officials are barred from conducting public business behind closed doors, but the penalties for doing so in the past have been a rarely levied fine and a written notice that Morhaim said was often ignored.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
Ever wonder why your neighborhood streams and rivers look so muddy after a heavy rain? A recent survey of construction sites in the Baltimore area found less than a quarter of the exposed soil being worked had been properly protected from erosion. The survey, involving staff and volunteers from 22 different environmental and community groups, found widely varying but generally poor controls on mud pollution being used at building sites in Baltimore City and the five surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake criticized the Police Department's handling of a high-profile police brutality investigation on Wednesday, and said she had directed the police commissioner to develop a "comprehensive" plan to address brutality in the agency. Speaking to reporters at City Hall, the mayor said top commanders should have quickly seen a video of an officer repeatedly punching a man, and should have moved immediately to take the officer off the street. "It is outrageous," Rawlings-Blake said of the conduct of the officer shown in the video, whom authorities have identified as Officer Vincent E. Cosom.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The furor over former Raven Ray Rice thrust the issue of domestic violence into the spotlight, but it also highlighted a part of football that fans likely spend little time thinking about: the league's security apparatus. Staffed largely by former police and federal law enforcement personnel — often high-ranking ones — the security departments maintained by the league and individual teams have a reputation of being able to work their contacts and launch behind-the-scenes investigations at the first sign of trouble.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Ocean City will look to better enforcement to cut down on problems with rowdy visitors instead of a ban on short-term rentals, according to a city official. The vacation destination had been considering adding regulations to govern some rental properties in response to complaints from some residents, but members of the planning and zoning commission backed away from the idea Wednesday, said Blaine Smith, the assistant director of the city's Planning and Zoning Department. “They don't think there needs to be new regulation.
NEWS
By Kristine Beckerle, Deborah Francois and Babur Khwaja | August 28, 2014
Police in Faisalabad, Pakistan's third largest city, tortured more than 1,400 people during a six-year period, according to a report researched and written by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School, for Justice Project Pakistan (JPP), a non-governmental organization based in Lahore, Pakistan. The report, which we authored, documents how law enforcement uses its power to inflict pain largely with impunity. Police beat detainees, hang them by their arms or feet for hours on end, force them to witness the torture of others, and strip them naked and parade them in public.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Law enforcement agencies in the Baltimore area and across the country are researching drones, intrigued by their potential for high-risk tactical raids and gathering intelligence. But uncertainty over federal regulations, concern about privacy issues and other factors have slowed many agencies from acquiring the unmanned aircraft. "There are still many unanswered questions into the future of drone use and how the [Federal Aviation Administration] will regulate those efforts," said Harford County sheriff's office spokeswoman Cristie Kahler.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Alison Knezevich and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
A nationwide hunt ended Friday night when Caitlyn Marie Virts, the 11-year-old girl missing since her mother was found killed in their Dundalk home on Thursday, was located in a motel room in Florence, S.C., with her father, Timothy Virts, who was taken into custody, Baltimore County police said. "He is in custody, and she is safe," Cpl. John Wachter, a police spokesman, told The Baltimore Sun. Virts, 38, was under warrant for arrest in connection with the stabbing death of Caitlyn's mother, Bobbie Jo Cortez, 36, who was found bound with duct tape in her bed in her home in the 3100 block of Ardee Way on Thursday morning.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 18, 1996
Seeking to get more students onto sidewalks and off icy streets, the Howard County police announced yesterday that they will begin enforcing a county requirement that sidewalks be shoveled.County law requires homeowners to clear their sidewalks within 48 hours after a snowfall. Violators can receive citations from the police and be fined up to $50.The announcement of stricter sidewalk enforcement came a day after an Oakland Mills High School freshman was struck by a car while walking home from school.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
As a former Ocean City rental property owner - and thank God I got rid of it recently - the problem posed by ill-behaved vacationers would be resolved if the cops did their job ( " Ocean City 's rental rage," Oct. 19). I rented my condo on a seasonal basis, and a few years a group from Russia stayed there. Owners have to pay $141 a year to rent their places, $25 of which was for a noise ordinance of some kind. These kids caused all kinds of problems, and the cops received a lot of complaints.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew fell like an unseen curtain across the city Friday night, and on many blocks, children continued to play outside for the first few minutes, oblivious to the controversial law. But at Poe Homes in West Baltimore, two mothers sitting on their front porches said they were obeying the rules willingly and happily. "It gets dark at 8 o'clock," said Nicole Williams as her 8-year-old son, Isaiah Turner, ran around just before the new law fell into place. "What child has reason to be outside?"
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