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Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 15, 2012
There are a couple of serious problems with the so-called "green jobs revolution. " The first concerns the serial overpromising of new jobs from politicians of all stripes. And it's easy to understand why the overpromising is so rampant: All of us want to believe alternative sources of energy will free us of our overdependence on foreign (and often hostile) sources of energy. Throw in the possibility of thousands of new technology jobs and you have plenty of eager politicians ready to sell a green jobs platform.
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Letter writer and Republican congressional candidate Dan Bongino apparently has never heard of George Shultz, former President Ronald Reagan's secretary of state. That's the only way to explain Mr. Bongino's assertion that a revenue-neutral carbon tax would "create chaos in the markets" ( "Delaney's energy policy a muddle," April 12). In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Mr. Shultz noted that a revenue-neutral carbon tax "would encourage producers and consumers to shift toward energy sources that emit less carbon - such as toward gas-fired power plants and away from coal-fired plants - and generate greater demand for electric and flex-fuel cars and lesser demand for conventional gasoline-powered cars.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Maryland wants to buy electricity generated from animal waste, the governor's office announced Thursday. As part of the Clean Bay Power project, the state is requesting proposals from potential energy suppliers who have the ability to generate up to 10 megawatts of electricity from poultry litter or livestock droppings - or any other kind of animal waste, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley's office. Providers must also be directly connected to the regional grid.
NEWS
April 12, 2014
Rep. John Delaney's commentary ("Natural gas is the right choice for the U.S.," April 2) speaks for the energy and job needs of Canada, Crimea, Europe, Russia, Ukraine the Midwestern United States and southern Maryland. Unmentioned in this geopolitical academic exercise are the energy and job needs of the very Congressional district he represents. I will help the congressman fill in the blanks by citing his distortions and omissions that may help him with his political base but harm everyone else in the district and create a strange sense of emptiness to people interested in growing jobs and the nation's energy needs.
NEWS
By Carl Perry and Connie Morella | February 16, 1994
IN THIS winter of ice and snow and record low temperatures, most people have been focused on keeping their body heat up and their energy budgets down.With the announcement of the federal energy budget for fiscal year 1995, President Clinton and Congress should seize this opportunity to dramatically shift federal energy research dollars toward energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy sources.For most Americans, using energy for whatever purpose is hard not only on the pocketbook; it's hard also on the environment because we are so dependent on fossil fuels and nuclear power.
NEWS
By Jonesboro (Ark.) Sun | June 14, 1991
THERE ARE three basic ways of improving the nation's energy situation. We can produce more oil to cut dependence on imports; we can increase fuel efficiency to conserve oil; we can develop alternative energy sources. Only the first of the three seems to interest a Senate Energy Committee evidently afflicted with tunnel vision.The national energy bill approved by the committee calls for opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling (at heavy environmental cost).But the proposed requirement to raise automotive fuel-efficiency standards was dropped from the bill.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGLES TIMES | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Over the objections of the White House and the utility industry, the Senate yesterday voted to require that 10 percent of the nation's electricity be generated from alternative energy sources - such as solar and wind power - by 2020. The vote complicates efforts to produce the first overhaul of national energy policy in a decade. Environmentalists, who have found little else they like in the bill, welcomed the decision to add the provision to the energy legislation. The bill includes measures designed to promote conservation and greater use of cleaner energy sources, but environmentalists have complained that it is still too heavily tilted toward greater production of traditional energy sources such as oil, natural gas, coal and nuclear power.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Pronouncing itself on the cutting edge of changes called for by the White House, the U.S. Department of Energy unveiled a $19.6 billion budget yesterday that would eliminate thousands of nuclear weapons production jobs and shift priorities toward environmental cleanup and the development of more efficient energy sources.Although Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary said that new programs would provide jobs for many of those idled by the curtailment of weapons production, she acknowledged it "would be unfair to pretend that each job will be replaced slot for slot."
NEWS
October 29, 2008
With unemployment rising and stock prices fluctuating, many Americans are taking comfort in one piece of good economic news. Gas prices have dropped to between $2 and $3 a gallon from their $4.11 high in July. But cheaper gas may not be in the country's long-term best interests if Americans respond to lower prices by abandoning their new economizing habits and returning to their guzzling. It's vitally important for the next president and Congress to keep the nation moving aggressively toward an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly future despite the availability of cheap oil. This year, high pump prices convinced most consumers that this country could no longer afford to remain dependent on expensive foreign oil. Many drivers turned to smaller, more fuel-efficient hybrid and electric cars and helped spur investments in clean and efficient energy industries.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
After reading Dan Rodricks ' "Despite tragedy, nuclear still way to go" (March 27), I am gratified that there are still thoughtful editorials and letters to the editor in support of nuclear power, despite the situation in Japan. Having had almost everything possible thrown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, there are still no deaths connected to the damaged reactors, proving again that nuclear power generation is the safest form of energy known to date. Yet thanks to a not always benevolent Mother Nature, thousands of people are dead or injured, and the majority of media coverage has diverted national attention away from the Japanese people's needs and suffering to focus on the "nuclear disaster.
NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | March 17, 2014
Maryland Congressman Steny Hoyer has tirelessly promoted his "Make It in America" campaign, an initiative to advance policies to help the country regain its role as a leading global manufacturer. For too long, we have seen American businesses relocate their manufacturing processes and their jobs overseas because, among other reasons, their energy costs were too high for their products to be competitive on the world stage. Today, U.S. businesses are moving manufacturing back to the United States, opening new factories or expanding their existing operations and hiring new workers thanks to the growing abundance of low-priced natural gas. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)
NEWS
June 4, 2013
In a recent letter to the editor, Charles Campbell rehashes tired talking points and cherry picks data to attack proven renewable energy sources like wind and solar power ("Nuclear is greenest," May 28). The old-school reliability concerns Mr. Campbell raises are most often voiced by fossil fuel companies - not the grid operators responsible for keeping the lights on. The "comprehensive study of U.S. wind power" that Mr. Campbell references is, in reality, based on data from four days in Colorado that was commissioned by the Independent Petroleum Association of the Mountain States.
NEWS
July 26, 2012
There is much concern in the U.S. about energy sources and our dependence on foreign oil. Hydraulic fracturing or fracking of shale may be a partial solution to this issue of energy independence. That's the good side of fracking. There's also a potentially bad side, and that is the contribution of exposure to chemicals associated with fracking to the decline of human health in communities, particularly rural communities. In her recent op-ed ("The hidden health risks of fracking," July 20)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 15, 2012
There are a couple of serious problems with the so-called "green jobs revolution. " The first concerns the serial overpromising of new jobs from politicians of all stripes. And it's easy to understand why the overpromising is so rampant: All of us want to believe alternative sources of energy will free us of our overdependence on foreign (and often hostile) sources of energy. Throw in the possibility of thousands of new technology jobs and you have plenty of eager politicians ready to sell a green jobs platform.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
Much has been said about the power outages caused by recent storms, but one thing rarely mentioned is the importance of getting people off the electrical grid. It's a national security issue when so many people are rendered helpless in a neighborhoods because their electrical power all comes from the local utility. The government should continue to offer incentives for households to install solar panels, wind turbines or geothermal systems of whatever size. It would help if even one or two people on a block had an energy source besides the grid.
NEWS
By Alex Pavlak | February 9, 2012
Last year, Gov.Martin O'Malley proposed to build 500 megawatts of offshore wind. The debate centered around how much this would really cost, and the proposal died. This year, the proposal is to spend a fixed amount of money by capping the amount by which Maryland electric bills can increase. The state would be saying, essentially: Give us a billion dollars so we can build some offshore wind. Like most Marylanders, I want electric power that is cheap and clean. However, I oppose offshore wind - because it is not cheap, and wind systems are not clean.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Letter writer and Republican congressional candidate Dan Bongino apparently has never heard of George Shultz, former President Ronald Reagan's secretary of state. That's the only way to explain Mr. Bongino's assertion that a revenue-neutral carbon tax would "create chaos in the markets" ( "Delaney's energy policy a muddle," April 12). In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Mr. Shultz noted that a revenue-neutral carbon tax "would encourage producers and consumers to shift toward energy sources that emit less carbon - such as toward gas-fired power plants and away from coal-fired plants - and generate greater demand for electric and flex-fuel cars and lesser demand for conventional gasoline-powered cars.
NEWS
By Stu Dalheim | September 20, 2011
Smart investors — including big firms placing millions and billions of dollars of their clients' money — know to look for long-term growth that gets ahead of emerging trends. That time-tested approach makes a great deal of sense today in looking at our energy future. Investors, from hedge fund wizards to institutional money managers like my company, see tremendous promise in the emerging clean-energy sector. So when stakeholders come to suburban Baltimore on Thursday to discuss the economics of a regional clean-fuels standard, we'll be paying close attention.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
It is unfortunate that commentator Charles Campbell's recent criticism of the current administration's handling of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline was so supercilious ("D.C.'s Keystone Kops," Jan. 30). He made valid points: Wind and solar power are inconstant and must be supplemented. Their installations can be intrusive and demand lots of space. And the broader question of our energy problem is enormously complex. However, that does not justify our failure to invest in alternative energy sources the way other countries have.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Maryland wants to buy electricity generated from animal waste, the governor's office announced Thursday. As part of the Clean Bay Power project, the state is requesting proposals from potential energy suppliers who have the ability to generate up to 10 megawatts of electricity from poultry litter or livestock droppings - or any other kind of animal waste, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley's office. Providers must also be directly connected to the regional grid.
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