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NEWS
By SUN STAFF | December 25, 2001
Maryland ranks 10th in the nation in energy efficiency, with 267 million Btu consumed per person in 1997. Alaskans use the most energy per capita: 1,145 Btu. One Btu, or British thermal unit, is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. It's equal to about 252 calories. State........Consumption .....Rank ................(million Btu) Hawaii...............201............1 New York...........226............2 Rhode Island.....
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NEWS
April 5, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's offshore wind bill seems to be much ado about nothing ("A better wind bill," April 2). Offshore wind energy is so prohibitively expensive that it is not well positioned to gain major traction in the coming years. According to the Energy Information Administration's cost assessment, offshore wind is projected to be four times as expensive as advanced combined cycle natural gas in the year 2016. With the imposition of a price cap, investment is unlikely to proceed without additional state and federal subsidies, which will inevitably be financed by the taxpayer.
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NEWS
April 5, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's offshore wind bill seems to be much ado about nothing ("A better wind bill," April 2). Offshore wind energy is so prohibitively expensive that it is not well positioned to gain major traction in the coming years. According to the Energy Information Administration's cost assessment, offshore wind is projected to be four times as expensive as advanced combined cycle natural gas in the year 2016. With the imposition of a price cap, investment is unlikely to proceed without additional state and federal subsidies, which will inevitably be financed by the taxpayer.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
Prices at the pump are rising, and Americans are none too happy about it. Small wonder that President Obama's approval ratings have fallen like a sack of hammers in recent weeks: Nothing annoys voters quite like a $75 fill-up at their local service station. But if paying $4-a-gallon for regular wasn't painful enough, filling station sticker shock has launched a deluge of nonsensical proposals to lower the price of gas. Perhaps the most dishonest of these is a renewed call for domestic oil drilling.
NEWS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK and WILLIAM NEIKIRK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department provided some chilling news for American consumers yesterday, estimating that natural gas prices nationwide would average 48 percent higher this winter over last winter. And that's assuming a moderate winter. On top of that, short-term interest rates are likely to go up this winter, too, the result of anti-inflation policies by the Federal Reserve, so that families with home equity loans will experience higher monthly payments on adjustable-rate mortgages.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Anticipating soaring energy bills this winter, the Bush administration unveiled a national campaign yesterday to highlight how families, businesses and the federal government can save energy and reduce expenses. Due to the disruption in oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico caused by Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, the Energy Information Administration, which collects and analyzes statistics for the Department of Energy, warned that heating oil expenses could rise 34 percent and electricity bills 11 percent this winter.
NEWS
By Jill Lancelot | May 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - With a gallon of gasoline costing more than a Big Mac, now is the time for Congress to take meaningful action to provide consumers with relief from the soaring prices at the pump. But when lawmakers had the opportunity to provide this support last month, they chose to do no such thing. Only days after President Bush first admitted that the "energy bill" would do nothing to lower gasoline prices, the House passed the measure anyway. The final product, a $92 billion package of subsidies, tax breaks and giveaways for big energy, wiped away any pretense that our elected officials were acting with the nation's best interests in mind.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
Prices at the pump are rising, and Americans are none too happy about it. Small wonder that President Obama's approval ratings have fallen like a sack of hammers in recent weeks: Nothing annoys voters quite like a $75 fill-up at their local service station. But if paying $4-a-gallon for regular wasn't painful enough, filling station sticker shock has launched a deluge of nonsensical proposals to lower the price of gas. Perhaps the most dishonest of these is a renewed call for domestic oil drilling.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
The "commodity" price for Baltimore Gas & Electric's 600,000 household natural gas customers popped up a bit for December, rising from 96 cents per therm last month to $1.05 per therm. The federal Energy Information Administration blames unseasonably cold weather in much of the country for increased demand and higher prices. But BGE's price is still far below its level of a few months ago and below offers from independent suppliers. BGE Home, a lesser-regulated company owned by BGE parent Constellation Energy, has been trying to sell households on a fixed-price gas contract of $1.599 for the winter.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | September 29, 2006
The very plans Jim Schwartz had thought would save him money have ended up costing him more. Last month, the Sykesville resident, fearing further rises in heating oil prices, decided to lock in his price by signing on to a "fixed-price" plan with his oil provider. He'll pay $2.79 per gallon to heat his home this winter. "I saw nothing to tell me that current oil prices would drop," Schwartz said. "Better the known devil of $2.79." But oil prices have dropped, and that means Schwartz and others who have chosen similar plans will have to either pay above-market rates or pay their oil companies a cancellation fee. For Schwartz, the fee would be $99. As the price per barrel of crude oil dropped steadily in recent weeks, heating oil prices decreased, too. On Sept.
NEWS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK and WILLIAM NEIKIRK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department provided some chilling news for American consumers yesterday, estimating that natural gas prices nationwide would average 48 percent higher this winter over last winter. And that's assuming a moderate winter. On top of that, short-term interest rates are likely to go up this winter, too, the result of anti-inflation policies by the Federal Reserve, so that families with home equity loans will experience higher monthly payments on adjustable-rate mortgages.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Anticipating soaring energy bills this winter, the Bush administration unveiled a national campaign yesterday to highlight how families, businesses and the federal government can save energy and reduce expenses. Due to the disruption in oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico caused by Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, the Energy Information Administration, which collects and analyzes statistics for the Department of Energy, warned that heating oil expenses could rise 34 percent and electricity bills 11 percent this winter.
NEWS
By Jill Lancelot | May 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - With a gallon of gasoline costing more than a Big Mac, now is the time for Congress to take meaningful action to provide consumers with relief from the soaring prices at the pump. But when lawmakers had the opportunity to provide this support last month, they chose to do no such thing. Only days after President Bush first admitted that the "energy bill" would do nothing to lower gasoline prices, the House passed the measure anyway. The final product, a $92 billion package of subsidies, tax breaks and giveaways for big energy, wiped away any pretense that our elected officials were acting with the nation's best interests in mind.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | December 25, 2001
Maryland ranks 10th in the nation in energy efficiency, with 267 million Btu consumed per person in 1997. Alaskans use the most energy per capita: 1,145 Btu. One Btu, or British thermal unit, is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. It's equal to about 252 calories. State........Consumption .....Rank ................(million Btu) Hawaii...............201............1 New York...........226............2 Rhode Island.....
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 2003
Unscathed by U.S. bombing, Iraq's northern oil fields were still pumping crude late this week, a surprise to many analysts who expected all Iraqi oil production to cease during the war. Ideally, the proceeds from this oil - which traveled by pipeline to the Turkish port of Ceyhan - would pay for food and medicine for Iraqis. But yesterday, 8.3 million barrels, worth nearly $200 million, sat in a Turkish storage facility, hostage to political and legal questions about who is authorized to sell it. "We're in a situation that is, practically speaking, without much precedent," said Amy Jaffe, energy program coordinator at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University and co-author of a report on postwar Iraq.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III | October 3, 1999
THESE DAYS, a trip to the gas station can wreck your afternoon -- especially if you own a burly pickup truck, or one of those SUVs that licks its chops the second you pull up to the pumps.Gasoline prices, after hitting a multiyear low in February, have surged a numbing 39 percent, to an average retail price of $1.26 per gallon. That's a three-year high, says one government survey.Higher gasoline prices nearly always rankle U.S. consumers, partly because we view driving a gas-guzzler as an American birthright.
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