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NEWS
March 5, 2014
Michelle Minton's commentary on Maryland's reasonable bill to stop stores from selling energy drinks to minors is misleading on a key point ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 26). She's simply wrong to claim that the Food and Drug Administration has given energy drinks a green light. In fact, the agency is investigating many serious injuries and nearly 30 deaths connected to the drinks by medical reports. Maryland is responding with legislation because the safety of adolescents and teens is more important than profits for Monster Beverage Corp.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014
I'd like to address some of Michelle Minton's comments directed at the bills aimed to ban energy drinks to minors ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 27). First of all, to say that these bills are "knee jerk legislation based on anecdotal evidence and sensational news headlines" is simply untrue. These drinks not only contain large amounts of caffeine but also contain other ingredients with stimulant properties. Also, let's clarify that the caffeine listed on cans of energy drinks is a food additive.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Contrary to Laura MacCleery's claim ( "Energy drinks can kill," March 5), I never asserted that the FDA gave energy drinks a "green light. " Rather, I noted in my op-ed ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 26) that the agency conducted an investigation in 2012 and found no cause to take action against these products. That doesn't mean the products are 100 percent safe for any individual to consume in any quantity, but that's true for most products. I didn't mention Anais Fournier because one death reportedly connected to energy drinks doesn't prove that energy drinks are dangerous, and it shouldn't be the basis for legislation.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Contrary to Laura MacCleery's claim ( "Energy drinks can kill," March 5), I never asserted that the FDA gave energy drinks a "green light. " Rather, I noted in my op-ed ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 26) that the agency conducted an investigation in 2012 and found no cause to take action against these products. That doesn't mean the products are 100 percent safe for any individual to consume in any quantity, but that's true for most products. I didn't mention Anais Fournier because one death reportedly connected to energy drinks doesn't prove that energy drinks are dangerous, and it shouldn't be the basis for legislation.
HEALTH
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Mike Gimbel travels around Baltimore with a cache of energy drinks, everything from Red Bull to Monster to 5-Hour Energy shots. When he talks to teenage athletes, the Towson-based substance abuse expert uses his display to help them understand what they consume when downing an energy drink before practice. Sure, they get the caffeine and the sugar that provide the boost they're looking for, but Gimbel said the athletes — and their parents — would be surprised to discover what else is on the label.
NEWS
By Fred Shuster and Fred Shuster,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | November 11, 2001
The slogans for so-called energy drinks promise benefits with instant appeal: Athletes will excel, partiers can stay on the go-go, students will be alert enough to study till dawn, and you'll be more productive than that annoying co-worker in the next cubicle. In fact, canned energy in the form of Red Bull, Sobe Adrenaline Rush, Hype, and countless other flashy caffeine- and sugar-choked beverages crowding the shelves has the potential not only to give you a lift but also to drop you on your own slim designer can. The boost in these hip-sounding products comes largely from caffeine -- about the same as a cup of strong-brewed coffee in each 8-ounce serving.
NEWS
By Rahul K. Parikh | September 8, 2008
Recently, one of my colleagues, a pediatric gastroenterologist, told me about a teenage boy who had come to see him because of severe stomach pain he'd had for about two months. The boy had been referred by his primary care doctor, who had evaluated him for several possible causes, including infections and ulcers. That doctor had also recommended or prescribed a variety of medications to relieve the pain, but to no avail. The specialist performed an endoscopy, in which a camera is inserted into a patient's esophagus and down into the stomach and upper part of the small intestine.
FEATURES
By Howard Cohen and Howard Cohen,McClatchy-Tribune | April 3, 2008
Energy drinks charged into the U.S. market in 1997 with Red Bull and its claim: "Improves performance ... increased concentration ... stimulates the metabolism." At 66.7 milligrams of caffeine per 8.3-ounce can, that would be a mere blip in the bold new world of energy drinks. A cup of coffee, by contrast, has 107.5 milligrams. Today, provocative handles like Cocaine (since changed to No Name, owing to a 2007 Food and Drug Administration ruling against naming a product after an illegal drug)
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
They claim to "give you wings," "unleash the beast" and propel you to attack life at "full throttle," but the bevy of energy drinks on the market could provide more than a turbo-charged rush. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University say some of the wildly popular beverages contain potentially harmful levels of caffeine - as much as 14 cans of Coca-Cola. In a review article appearing in this month's issue of the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, the researchers say the drinks should carry warning labels displaying their caffeine content and possible health risks, such as nervousness, anxiety, insomnia, rapid heartbeat and tremors.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
Michelle Minton's commentary on Maryland's reasonable bill to stop stores from selling energy drinks to minors is misleading on a key point ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 26). She's simply wrong to claim that the Food and Drug Administration has given energy drinks a green light. In fact, the agency is investigating many serious injuries and nearly 30 deaths connected to the drinks by medical reports. Maryland is responding with legislation because the safety of adolescents and teens is more important than profits for Monster Beverage Corp.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
I'd like to address some of Michelle Minton's comments directed at the bills aimed to ban energy drinks to minors ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 27). First of all, to say that these bills are "knee jerk legislation based on anecdotal evidence and sensational news headlines" is simply untrue. These drinks not only contain large amounts of caffeine but also contain other ingredients with stimulant properties. Also, let's clarify that the caffeine listed on cans of energy drinks is a food additive.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | February 26, 2014
In Maryland, as in other states, consumers need to show ID when buying alcohol or tobacco products. Energy drinks could be added to that list of "adult" products if bills before the General Assembly are passed. House bill 1273 and Senate bill 986 were filed to ostensibly protect the Free State's children from a potentially hazardous product. But not only will the bills fail to protect minors, they could backfire and cause more harm than good for both adults and children in Maryland.
HEALTH
By Steve Kilar and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
The parents of a 14-year-old Hagerstown girl who died in December are suing an energy drink company in a California court, alleging that caffeine in the beverages contributed to her death, according to court records. A complaint filed Friday by Wendy Crossland and Richard Fournier states that their daughter, Anais Fournier, went into cardiac arrest after drinking two 24-ounce Monster Beverage Corp. drinks within a 24-hour period. Monster is based in Riverside County, Calif., where the case was filed.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
With the extreme heat, and even in less extreme temperatures, those who spend any time outside must stay properly hydrated. Some drinks are better than others, and some people need more fluids than others, says Dr. Marc I. Leavey, an internist at Mercy Medical Center and Lutherville Personal Physicians. Should people drink mineral/vitamin waters or Gatorade? And what about energy drinks (i.e., Red Bull, Rockstar): Are they dangerous? What about alcoholic drinks? For dehydration from exercise and heat, cool water is still the best.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Pancakes. Sandwiches. Omelets. And that's just breakfast. Michael Phelps' notorious calorie-dense training diet is so well known, even a NFL football player is using it to bulk up for the season. Aaron Maybin, a linebacker for the New York Jets, says the Olympian's eating habits have been his inspiration to gain 20 pounds. “He eats like one of us,” Maybin told the New York Post, gesturing to his hulking teammates. Maybin, who lives in Maryland, says during the off-season he's spent time with Phelps and watched in awe as he's chowed down.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
It used to be eight glasses of water a day was enough. Now drinking for good health has gotten a lot more complicated. In the past few years, cold beverages have been the hottest sales category of any specialty foods, according to Specialty Food magazine. Between 2002 and 2004, sales of these New Age drinks jumped almost 40 percent. Last year alone, a staggering 1,020 new alternatives to traditional sodas were introduced. That's a lot of enhanced water beverages, energy drinks, flavored teas and specialty sodas.
EXPLORE
By Nikki Highsmith Vernick | May 30, 2012
Growing up in Texas, I played fast pitch softball. After playing in the hot Texas sun, our team, the Sweetpeas, had a snack of oranges and water, in containers brought from home. Today, my husband and I are new Howard County residents and we have gotten our children, ages 6 and 4, involved in sports activities, beginning with T-ball. We have been struck by the well-groomed baseball fields and the engaged volunteer parents. We were impressed with it all — until the post-game snacks came out. Over the last three weeks, these snacks have included chips, fruit roll-ups, sugary rice treats, chocolate-covered doughnuts with rainbow sprinkles, assorted fruit punch and sports drinks.
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