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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- More than a year after Congress told the Energy Department to harden the nation's nuclear bomb factories and laboratories against terrorist raids, five of the 11 sites are certain to miss their deadlines, some by many years, the Government Accountability Office has found. The Energy Department has put off security improvements at some sites that store plutonium because it plans to consolidate the material at central locations, but the GAO said in a Senate briefing that that project is also likely to lag. A copy of the briefing materials was provided to The New York Times by a private group, the Project on Government Oversight, which has long been pushing for better security at the weapons sites.
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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2007
The Energy Department approved giving federal loan guarantees to finance new nuclear plants yesterday, but the industry won't be able to take advantage until Congress approves billions more to fund the program - something that is not expected until at least 2009. Despite that delay, the decision could help Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group kick-start development of a new reactor it hopes to put adjacent to its Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in Lusby. Constellation said the loan guarantees are essential to its plans to build a standardized series of advanced nuclear plants for itself and other utility buyers nationwide.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
The Energy Department designated Maryland and most of the Mid-Atlantic yesterday as part of a national corridor targeted for new power lines, giving federal regulators authority to overrule state objections to utility projects deemed critical to keeping the lights on. The region's designation as a "national interest electric transmission corridor" has the potential to minimize delays in getting several proposed transmission lines built in parts of...
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,sun reporter | July 23, 2007
Constellation Energy Group's bid to be a leader in the nuclear industry's revival might be derailed if Bush administration officials don't back off of a proposal to cut the scope of loan guarantees approved by Congress, company and industry officials say. Michael J. Wallace, who heads Constellation's nuclear business, said bankers won't finance the company's half-dozen proposed nuclear reactors unless the Energy Department agrees to back 100 percent of...
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 7, 2007
We seem to be at a turning point in the future of energy and the response to global warming. The United Nations report on climate change has given momentum to critics of the status quo. Even conservatives (economists Greg Mankiw and Gary Becker, former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan) suggest taxing traditional energy to discourage fuels that contribute to warming. The huge buyout offer for Texas energy giant TXU includes a promise to scrap eight planned electricity plants powered by coal, one of the worst sources of greenhouse gas. Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty just signed a bill requiring state utilities to produce a fourth of their electricity from wind and other renewable energy by 2025.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | January 8, 2006
At 9 p.m., a window pops up on activated computers at Department of Energy headquarters: "Do you want to continue?" the system asks. If no one is around to click "Yes," the machine shuts down, saving energy and taxpayers a few cents each night. It's the newest way for the keepers of the nation's energy policy to lead by example and help the federal government, the nation's largest energy consumer, meet its post-Hurricane Katrina mandate of cutting its use 2 percent this year, spokesman Mike Waldron said.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | January 6, 2006
At 9 p.m., a window pops up on activated computers at Department of Energy headquarters: "Do you want to continue?" the system asks. If no one is around to click "Yes," the machine shuts down, saving energy and taxpayers a few cents each night. It's the newest way for the keepers of the nation's energy policy to lead by example and help the federal government, the nation's largest energy consumer, meet its post-Hurricane Katrina mandate of cutting its own use 2 percent this year, spokesman Mike Waldron said.
NEWS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK and WILLIAM NEIKIRK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department provided some chilling news for American consumers yesterday, estimating that natural gas prices nationwide would average 48 percent higher this winter over last winter. And that's assuming a moderate winter. On top of that, short-term interest rates are likely to go up this winter, too, the result of anti-inflation policies by the Federal Reserve, so that families with home equity loans will experience higher monthly payments on adjustable-rate mortgages.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Anticipating soaring energy bills this winter, the Bush administration unveiled a national campaign yesterday to highlight how families, businesses and the federal government can save energy and reduce expenses. Due to the disruption in oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico caused by Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, the Energy Information Administration, which collects and analyzes statistics for the Department of Energy, warned that heating oil expenses could rise 34 percent and electricity bills 11 percent this winter.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2005
If you could save 15 cents a gallon by filling up at a gas station that's a bit out of your way, would you do it? In these days of $2.69-a-gallon gasoline, most people probably would. But how many drivers would cut back their highway speeds by 5 mph to save the same amount? They could, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. For every 5 mph a motorist drives above 60 mph, the gas wasted is the equivalent of shelling out an extra 15 cents a gallon. So streaking along at 75 mph is like spending an extra 45 cents a gallon.
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