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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 8, 2001
Incredibly, despite the fact that I have already devoted an entire column to it, California's energy crisis is getting worse. It's so bad that, in some parts of the state, fireflies no longer have enough power to illuminate their own behinds. They must attract mates by shouting into the darkness: "Blink! Hey! Over here! BLINK!" This is bad. Because if California can't solve the energy crisis, it will spread to the rest of the nation, and the economy will collapse, and we will become a primitive society where we all run around naked with spears and refuse to attend meetings.
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NEWS
May 13, 2011
The moratorium on off-shore oil drilling imposed on us by Obama's faulty energy policy is the main reason for high gasoline prices. Now that the price of a barrel of oil is around $100 a barrel because of the revolutions in Egypt, Libya and the rest of the Middle East, our economic recession likely will become even greater because of inflation. With the price of gas headed toward $5 per gallon, you can count on the price of nearly everything else going up, too. Oil companies and speculators are most certainly not to blame for rising prices when imported oil is at risk.
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BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and By Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 2000
It's not like the solar panels are flying off the shelves at Global Solar & Electric in Darlington, but a steady flow of customers are definitely asking more questions. "A lot of people are calling me about using the thermal type of solar energy," said William Rhodes, Global's owner and president. "New homes usually don't have it ... but I can tell that it's dawning on people about the cost of energy." Over the years, Rhodes has watched solar power's popularity swing up and down. And today he's not sure what's going to happen, what with the prices of natural gas, electricity and heating oil expected to rise 15 percent to 40 percent this winter.
BUSINESS
By LEON LAZAROFF and LEON LAZAROFF,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- The price of oil remains high, and with it shares of solar energy stocks. In the nine months since it became apparent that Hurricane Katrina would pummel the Gulf Coast, solar energy stocks have soared on expectations that alternative energy would attract more business. Since Aug. 22, a week before Katrina touched land, shares in solar panel-maker Energy Conversion Devices Inc. are up 68 percent. Evergreen Solar Inc., another solar panel manufacturer, has increased more than 90 percent, even after its shares slid in March when its main silicon provider terminated a supply contract.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2001
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - After spending months voicing opposition to rate hikes, California Gov. Gray Davis acknowledged to a statewide television audience last night the need for an electricity rate increase that would average 26.5 percent. For the first time calling it an "energy crisis," Davis enumerated steps he has taken, then said he has fought "tooth and nail against raising rates." But saying increases were needed, the Democratic governor called for a tiered system in which people who use the most electricity pay the most - as much as 37 percent if they use more than twice their minimum allotment.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 25, 1995
Washington -- In 1955 Adlai Stevenson, who was the intelligentsia's political pinup and was considered by advanced thinkers to be an advanced thinker, delivered the commencement address to those he called the ''gallant girls'' of Smith College.He said they had ''a unique opportunity to influence us, man and boy.'' He urged them ''to restore valid, meaningful purpose to life in your home'' and to address the ''crisis in the humble role of housewife.'' He said they could do all this ''in the living room with a baby in your lap, or in the kitchen with a can opener in your hands'' and ''maybe you can even practice your saving arts on that unsuspecting man while he's watching television!
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 2005
Reliant Energy Inc. reached an agreement to pay $460 million to settle claims that it unfairly profited from the West Coast energy crisis in 2000 and 2001, company executives and state officials said yesterday. The settlement will cover several claims brought by electric utilities, ratepayers and officials from three states - California, Oregon and Washington - and it will bring the total fines and settlements that Reliant has paid to $525 million. Reliant, based in Houston, and other power companies including Enron Corp.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - There's plenty of awful news flowing from the White House these days. The nation is in "an energy crisis." The economy is "sputtering." So says President Bush, almost daily, before adding that he knows just the solutions. They happen to be part of his domestic agenda. The answer to the nation's energy woes? Boost domestic energy supplies - for example, open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to oil drilling. The prescription for a sliding economy? A $1.6 trillion tax cut. The president's alarmist words come even as experts question the severity of the nation's energy problems and point to some positive signs that the economy, while clearly slowing, is not sinking into serious recession, despite the 13.5 percent plunge in the Dow Jones industrial average over the past 10 trading sessions.
NEWS
May 13, 2011
The moratorium on off-shore oil drilling imposed on us by Obama's faulty energy policy is the main reason for high gasoline prices. Now that the price of a barrel of oil is around $100 a barrel because of the revolutions in Egypt, Libya and the rest of the Middle East, our economic recession likely will become even greater because of inflation. With the price of gas headed toward $5 per gallon, you can count on the price of nearly everything else going up, too. Oil companies and speculators are most certainly not to blame for rising prices when imported oil is at risk.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jonathan Peterson and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Taking a tough new stance, federal energy regulators said yesterday that more than 30 private companies manipulated natural gas and electricity prices during the California energy crisis, and moved to increase the state's refund to about $3.3 billion. In addition, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission threatened to revoke the trading authority of eight subsidiaries of bankrupt Enron Corp. for allegedly gaming the natural gas market. It also said it is prepared to strip the trading authority of Reliant Energy Services Inc. and BP Energy Co. for allegedly engaging in "coordinated efforts" to manipulate electricity prices at Palo Verde, a key Arizona trading hub. Both companies denied the charges.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | May 16, 2006
The kids are home from college for the summer, and we are having a conversation very different from the one we had last year at this time. It isn't about curfews or the bathroom or dishes in the sink. It isn't about drinking or staying out all night or how their family home is not some kind of youth hostel. Well, OK. The conversation is about all those things. Our college-aged children seem to forget, from one summer to the next, that Mom is not running a frat house or a dormitory dining hall.
NEWS
By CARL WOOD | April 19, 2006
The high costs Californians have experienced with deregulated electric power could foretell the future for Marylanders. The 72 percent rate increase Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers face this summer is a familiar scenario for Californians. In California, an electric deregulation scheme was pushed through with smiles and happy faces all around. A few years passed with utilities and generators repositioning generating assets outside of state cost-of-service regulation, while retail rates were frozen or capped.
NEWS
By CHRIS FICK | December 15, 2005
Marylanders have spent the last few months nervously watching gasoline prices. But as winter nears and prices fall, many of us are facing an even bigger potential economic wallop: rising home heating prices. The numbers are sobering. The U.S. Energy Department predicts that residential and commercial consumers in Maryland will spend $862 million more than last year for heating oil and natural gas, a 48 percent increase. For the average Marylander, this means $374. A colder-than-predicted winter could make even these projected increases seem rosy.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 2005
Reliant Energy Inc. reached an agreement to pay $460 million to settle claims that it unfairly profited from the West Coast energy crisis in 2000 and 2001, company executives and state officials said yesterday. The settlement will cover several claims brought by electric utilities, ratepayers and officials from three states - California, Oregon and Washington - and it will bring the total fines and settlements that Reliant has paid to $525 million. Reliant, based in Houston, and other power companies including Enron Corp.
NEWS
By Diane MacEachern | May 30, 2005
AFTER DISASTER struck on 9/11, President Bush exhorted Americans to go shopping. The connection between fighting terrorists and, say, buying a new pair of shoes was never really all that clear to me. I guess the president figured it was important to make us feel as if we were part of the solution to this terrible new problem confronting our country. I'm not sure how many new pairs of shoes Mr. Bush bought, but I bought a couple, including some running shoes (I thought they might come in handy, under the circumstances)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2003
TOKYO - Judging by the warnings of the electricity company here in the world's largest city, this will be a summer unlike all others, with severe power shortages and blackouts predicted. Industry officials hedge these alarming forecasts with one big "if." The Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, says it will be able to keep its customers' tempers from boiling over only if it is allowed to press 16 nuclear power plants back into operation. The plants were temporarily taken out of service last year after a scandal over falsified inspections and poor maintenance.
NEWS
By Diane MacEachern | May 30, 2005
AFTER DISASTER struck on 9/11, President Bush exhorted Americans to go shopping. The connection between fighting terrorists and, say, buying a new pair of shoes was never really all that clear to me. I guess the president figured it was important to make us feel as if we were part of the solution to this terrible new problem confronting our country. I'm not sure how many new pairs of shoes Mr. Bush bought, but I bought a couple, including some running shoes (I thought they might come in handy, under the circumstances)
NEWS
By CARL WOOD | April 19, 2006
The high costs Californians have experienced with deregulated electric power could foretell the future for Marylanders. The 72 percent rate increase Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers face this summer is a familiar scenario for Californians. In California, an electric deregulation scheme was pushed through with smiles and happy faces all around. A few years passed with utilities and generators repositioning generating assets outside of state cost-of-service regulation, while retail rates were frozen or capped.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jonathan Peterson and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Taking a tough new stance, federal energy regulators said yesterday that more than 30 private companies manipulated natural gas and electricity prices during the California energy crisis, and moved to increase the state's refund to about $3.3 billion. In addition, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission threatened to revoke the trading authority of eight subsidiaries of bankrupt Enron Corp. for allegedly gaming the natural gas market. It also said it is prepared to strip the trading authority of Reliant Energy Services Inc. and BP Energy Co. for allegedly engaging in "coordinated efforts" to manipulate electricity prices at Palo Verde, a key Arizona trading hub. Both companies denied the charges.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 8, 2001
Incredibly, despite the fact that I have already devoted an entire column to it, California's energy crisis is getting worse. It's so bad that, in some parts of the state, fireflies no longer have enough power to illuminate their own behinds. They must attract mates by shouting into the darkness: "Blink! Hey! Over here! BLINK!" This is bad. Because if California can't solve the energy crisis, it will spread to the rest of the nation, and the economy will collapse, and we will become a primitive society where we all run around naked with spears and refuse to attend meetings.
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