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NEWS
February 16, 2012
Environmental expert Alex Pavlak pointed out some interesting facts regarding Governor O'Malley's offshore wind farm idea ("The energy is clean, but the system for getting it is not," Feb. 10). The governor's goal is to produce one-fifth of our energy needs by green methods by 2022. Mr. Pavlak points out that green energy costs roughly four times as much to produce as our current generators. A little simple math shows the average cost per kilowatt hour would double in today's dollars.
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NEWS
By Ruth Ann Norton and Deron Lovaas | August 12, 2014
As Maryland considers options for cutting climate-warming emissions from existing power plants, the good news is we're already ahead of most other states in meeting new targets proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. But let's not rest on our laurels. Thanks to energy efficiency programs being developed in the coming months, we can deliver energy savings to more Marylanders, benefiting all our families and communities. Now is the time to contact Gov. Martin O'Malley to remind him how important it is to ramp up work by our utilities and state agencies to deliver energy efficiency, which reduces the need to generate electricity with fuels that create the carbon pollution that harms our health and planet.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Valorie Cooley was "in a really bad place" a year ago, with a broken furnace and past-due heating bills she couldn't pay. Now her Baltimore home has a new furnace and a raft of energy-efficient improvements - including insulation in the attic and caulking around the windows - that pulled her Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill down to a level she can afford. All coordinated by city government. That's one example of how Baltimore agencies have attacked energy costs in recent years - their own as well as residents' and businesses'.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
How would you like to receive a quarterly check from the federal government? Most taxpayers would surely be happy with such an arrangement. But here's the really good part: What if by accepting that check you were also helping your country reduce a form of air pollution that is a threat to human health and responsible for climate change while simultaneously developing a rational, sustainable energy policy? That sounds too good to be true, but remarkably, it may not be. Under The Healthy Climate and Family Security Act introduced last week by Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, companies that drill for oil and gas or mine for coal would have to purchase through auction a permit to do so. Not a dime of the resulting revenue would be kept by the government but would simply be forwarded as checks to every man, woman and child.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | September 28, 1990
Energy prices are on the rise and may rise even more. Making improvements that will increase your home's energy efficiency is a consideration that takes on more urgency this year. You are merely typical if you are seeking to reduce your consumption of fuel. Will you replace storm windows? Replace an inefficient heating system? Add insulation? Install new windows that hold in the heat? Whatever you plan, beware. Crooks disguised as home-improvement contractors are on the lookout to make a killing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The $113.5 million that Exelon Corp. agreed to make available for innovative projects — a condition of regulatory approval for its purchase of Constellation Energy in Baltimore — was awarded Thursday to groups planning to help low-income customers, small businesses and others lower their energy bills. Exelon's Maryland regulator, the Public Service Commission, decided how to distribute the money after receiving 98 proposals. Baltimore will receive the largest single piece of the fund — nearly $53 million will go to the city government for projects to permanently lower energy bills through energy efficiency work such as weatherization, upgrades and lower-usage education.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
The Commerce Department reported last week that consumer confidence had plummeted almost 19 points in September, its biggest drop in 15 years. One big reason is clear - we have finally become convinced that higher energy prices are here to stay. Americans can expect to pay thousands more in the coming year to heat their houses and drive their cars. The rapid increase in energy costs will be felt indirectly too, as airlines, delivery services and companies that use petrochemicals in manufacturing scamper to cover their higher costs with higher prices.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
Give yourselves a pat on the back, America. In light of soaring energy costs, Americans have given generously this cold season by contributing $34.7 million more than usual to help low-income customers pay their heating bills, says the Washington-based National Community Action Foundation. Normally, about $100 million is raised each year. The good news comes just as the Department of Energy released predictions that, despite mild weather and lower-than-expected prices, residential heating bills still will be 24 percent higher this season than a year ago. So congratulations, rate-payers, stockholders and utility industry foundations, for recognizing that the less fortunate needed more help this season.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2001
After working on the problem for six months - even recycling heat from laundry dryers and dishwashers - the owners of the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel felt they had no choice. The Renaissance has become one of a growing number of hotels across the nation to have added surcharges to their room rates, forcing customers to help foot rising energy bills. "Our costs have been soaring extraordinarily," John C. Davis, the hotel's director of marketing, said. "At the same time we were reluctant to dive into this.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF DpA | May 15, 1998
Maryland manufacturers yesterday said the global climate treaty negotiated in Kyoto, Japan, would raise energy costs, threaten thousands of state jobs and shrink tax revenue by millions of dollars."
NEWS
March 12, 2014
According to Dominion Power, the development of fracking has blessed us with new sources of natural gas available for extraction and sale to the highest global bidder. This latest effort being put forth to build a natural gas export facility at Cove Point is all about making money for a select group of "investors" for as long as it lasts. It is not about jobs, the economy or creating a safe energy source. It is about selling our natural resources, as fast as possible, to the highest bidder until they are completely gone.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 17, 2013
A group headed by a Republican who plans to run in next year's gubernatorial election is blaming Gov. Martin O'Malley for rising utility costs, echoing one of O'Malley's campaign tactics against his predecessor. O'Malley beat then-Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in 2006 on a platform that included criticism of that administration's handling of an impending spike in Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. rates. Change Maryland - chaired by Larry Hogan, who said in November that he will enter the race for governor - issued a report card Monday that said Maryland residents' electricity rates are 43 percent higher now than they were when O'Malley took office.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company and the Maryland Public Service Commission should not consider the small number of customers who showed up at the first rate-increase hearing as an indication that most people have no opinion on the fact that their energy costs are going up ( "Public a no-show at first BGE rate case hearing," Nov. 4). Rather, they should see it as a sign that many of BGE's customers understand that the company will get its way no matter how many people show up and voice their displeasure.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Leigh Peterson has one of the coolest roofs in Baltimore. Her rowhouse near Patterson Park sports a blinding white cap, topped by a row of shiny solar panels. Peterson, 29, a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, doesn't need to see her roof to know it's cool, though. She just has to count the dollars she's saved on air conditioning. She got her roof coated as part of a comprehensive energy retrofit of her 109-year-old house, and her August electricity bill was about half what she paid last year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said Thursday that energy prices will rise $6 a month for the typical residential electricity customer who doesn't use an outside power supplier, the first jump in energy prices in four years. That rise in costs, running from June through next May, comes on top of a distribution-rate increase approved in February. The state calculated that distribution rise at $3.33 a month for the average residential electricity customer, though BGE said typical customers - halfway between the biggest and smallest power-users - would pay $2.66 a month extra.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Valorie Cooley was "in a really bad place" a year ago, with a broken furnace and past-due heating bills she couldn't pay. Now her Baltimore home has a new furnace and a raft of energy-efficient improvements - including insulation in the attic and caulking around the windows - that pulled her Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill down to a level she can afford. All coordinated by city government. That's one example of how Baltimore agencies have attacked energy costs in recent years - their own as well as residents' and businesses'.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
Constellation Energy Group is amassing a client list as diverse as spicemaker McCormick & Co., the New York Stock Exchange, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum and the Denver International Airport. The Baltimore energy company put up solar panels on McCormick's Hunt Valley distribution center and spice mill and is working on a second project at its Belcamp plant. Constellation is selling "renewable energy certificates" to the stock exchange and baseball museum. And Constellation plans to announce today the development of a 4.4-megawatt solar facility at the Denver airport, enough to power 634 homes a year.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Solar power will never replace jet power at BWI Marshall Airport, but officials believe the clean energy generated by newly installed roof panels atop the daily parking garage could boost the airport's image and bottom line. The solar panels are part of a $19.4 million package of upgrades to conserve energy, shrink the airport's carbon footprint and reduce water consumption, said Paul Wiedefeld, executive director of Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. "Two things drove this project: the environmental impact and the savings," Wiedefeld said Thursday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The $113.5 million that Exelon Corp. agreed to make available for innovative projects — a condition of regulatory approval for its purchase of Constellation Energy in Baltimore — was awarded Thursday to groups planning to help low-income customers, small businesses and others lower their energy bills. Exelon's Maryland regulator, the Public Service Commission, decided how to distribute the money after receiving 98 proposals. Baltimore will receive the largest single piece of the fund — nearly $53 million will go to the city government for projects to permanently lower energy bills through energy efficiency work such as weatherization, upgrades and lower-usage education.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
I was flabbergasted by Stanley Glinka's recent letter criticizing President Obama's performance in office ("Obama made U.S. weaker, more vulnerable," Oct. 31). He obviously lives in a different country than the rest of us. Let me point out that over the last 32 years the White House has been occupied for 20 years by Republicans and 12 years by Democrats, counting President Obama's first term. So I marvel during this campaign season at how, according to the Republicans, all the nation's problems supposedly begin and end with President Obama.
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