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SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
LONG BEACH, Calif. - Does Michael Phelps really want to look up to Ian Thorpe on the medal podium in Athens? That was the operative question after the world's most versatile swimmer handled the best this continent could offer in the 200-meter freestyle at the U.S. Olympic team trials last night. He won despite a start that his coach termed "ridiculous." He didn't post any of his precious personal bests, but tactics were more important than time in a 44-minute span that concluded with the semifinals of the 200 butterfly.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - Bowing to vigorous opposition from automakers and their workers yesterday, the Senate easily defeated a proposal to require vehicles to become more fuel-efficient as a way to protect the environment. By a vote of 62-38, the Senate decided instead to direct the Bush administration to study how best to raise fuel-efficiency standards and to make recommendations within two years - effectively putting off action on the issue. Leaders of the drive for higher standards had argued that the result of adopting them would be cleaner air, a healthier environment and energy conservation.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2001
HAVING RECENTLY assumed a $10,000 loan for my daughter's college tuition, I did not leap at calls to spend my $500 federal tax refund "symbolically" - giving it to groups opposing President Bush's bloated and polluting energy program, for example. I am equally impervious to post-Sept. 11 exhortations to spend in the name of patriotism. There is nothing patriotic about more debt. Still, I did allocate some refund money to buy energy-saving fluorescent lights after taking a simple and revealing test that lets you evaluate your personal impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
ENERGY IS both source and limit of all we do. In an essay, "Why Big Fierce Animals Are Rare," ecologist Paul Colinvaux notes that the existence of top-of-the-food-web creatures - lions, tigers, great white sharks - "creates a theoretical possibility for other animals to evolve to eat them. "But the food calories to be won from hunting great white sharks and tigers are too few to support a minimum population of animals as large and horribly ferocious as these would have to be." One might argue that modern humans, with the heads of lions, tigers and sharks in their air-conditioned, dehumidified trophy rooms, are the energetic equivalents of Colinvaux's top predator-eating dragons.
NEWS
March 23, 2001
GREEN buildings make good sense, and Maryland officials are showing good sense by requiring them for state use. Energy efficiency will be the key to constructing new buildings or leasing new facilities for state offices, der an executive order signed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. At least 6 percent of the energy for new state facilities must come from renewable sources, such as solar panels or wind turbines. That design will also reduce air pollution and global-warming "greenhouse gases" produced by burning fossil fuels like oil and coal.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
The Glendening administration is expected today to throw its support behind a bill that would create a $35 million energy conservation program funded by a surcharge on business and residential customers' utility bills. The legislation, opposed by Maryland utilities, seeks to reactivate some of the energy-saving programs that were left stranded when the General Assembly passed a landmark electric industry deregulation bill two years ago. Frederick H. Hoover Jr., director of the Maryland Energy Administration, is to deliver Gov. Parris N. Glendening's endorsement at a press conference today with the bill's chief sponsors, Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat, and Del. Brian K. McHale, a Baltimore Democrat.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 11, 2001
Attention Gov. Gray Davis: Want to rescue California from the energy crisis? Cut the decorative lights on the Golden Gate Bridge, end all television shows at midnight and put the kibosh on any new theme parks. Oh, yeah, and while you're at it, ban electric golf carts. Make those duffers haul their own clubs. These are just a few of the hundreds of energy-saving ideas submitted to the state government in the past few weeks by folks who believe they can help guide California through the crisis.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATION STAFF | January 27, 2001
SAN JOSE, Calif. - Power crisis? What power crisis? Sure, California's two biggest utilities have a $12 billion deficit and are close to bankruptcy. Silicon Valley manufacturers have lost tens of millions of dollars because of sporadic outages. And the Chinese ambassador to the United States found himself sitting in the dark last week at the $450-a-night San Jose Hilton. But Andrew Sims, for one, is tired of hearing that his state - the world's sixth-largest economy and birthplace of some of its most innovative technology - is in panic mode because lights have gone off here and there.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
The deregulation of the electric industry is increasing air pollution, as utilities forced to slash costs to compete turn to outdated plants for cheaper power, a new study contends."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1996
NEW YORK -- Even before today's final major Kentucky Derby preps are run, Unbridled's Song is a winner.By meeting a small, relatively weak field in the $500,000, 1 1/8 -mile Wood Memorial at Aqueduct, he should triumph with less than an all-out effort, emerging with energy in reserve for the Kentucky Derby three weeks away."
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