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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
The Baltimore Convention Center expects to save $18 million in energy costs over 15 years because of water and energy conservation renovations it announced Monday. Constellation, a division of energy provider Exelon Corp., will install the efficiency measures, according to a joint statement from the energy company and the convention center. Although the conservation efforts — along with other capital improvements planned for the center — come with a $10 million price tag, no money is required up front from the convention center, the statement said.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will use $52 million from a state grant to bolster Baltimore's energy conservation efforts, including improving education and outreach efforts. The goal of the Baltimore Energy Initiative, announced this week by the mayor's office, is to reduce energy use in the city and promote local investment. Money from the initiative will give some city residents free in-home installation of programmable thermostats, pipe wraps and other energy and water conservation equipment.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will use $52 million from a state grant to bolster Baltimore's energy conservation efforts, including improving education and outreach efforts. The goal of the Baltimore Energy Initiative, announced this week by the mayor's office, is to reduce energy use in the city and promote local investment. Money from the initiative will give some city residents free in-home installation of programmable thermostats, pipe wraps and other energy and water conservation equipment.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The bitter cold is forecast to subside Friday, but with four recent weather-related deaths reported in the state, officials are urging Marylanders to remain prepared - and warning of high utility bills with nearly two months of winter to go. While highs around 40 degrees might feel balmy Friday, they are about the norm for this time of year. The repeated blasts of polar air that have covered the region in recent weeks have this month poised to rank as one of the 10 coldest Januarys on record here.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer is expected to announce plans for two energy conservation projects while in Harford County tomorrow.Schaefer will be joined by George McGowan, chairman of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., to announce the projects, aimed at cutting gasoline and lighting costs of state government operations, according to a press release from the governor's office.Schaefer and McGowan will give details of the project at the Mary E. W.Risteau District Courts and Multi-Services Center on Bond Street in Bel Air at 10 a.m.Schaefer will kick off his visit to the county at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new headquarters for the Democratic Central Committee at 25 Pennsylvania Ave., Bel Air, at 8:30 a.m.The governor also is scheduled to visit the county Office on Aging at 9:35 a.m. and the Havre de Grace High School at 11:15 a.m. He also is expected to make two stops in Cecil County.
NEWS
October 3, 1991
Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s decision to buy power from an independent, non-regulated producer is a response to the increasing pressure on U.S. utilities to conserve. Instead of undertaking costly new construction to serve its growing market, BG&E is following a sensible course: reducing future outlays by encouraging energy conservation as well as purchasing, instead producing, the added power it needs. This should keep prices down for consumers in the years ahead.Laws in Maryland and other states give utilities strong incentives to push for cutbacks in power usage.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The bitter cold is forecast to subside Friday, but with four recent weather-related deaths reported in the state, officials are urging Marylanders to remain prepared - and warning of high utility bills with nearly two months of winter to go. While highs around 40 degrees might feel balmy Friday, they are about the norm for this time of year. The repeated blasts of polar air that have covered the region in recent weeks have this month poised to rank as one of the 10 coldest Januarys on record here.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 16, 1990
WASHINGTON -- White House aides led by White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu have told Energy Secretary James D. Watkins to remove energy conservation measures from his proposed National Energy Strategy, endangering President Bush's long-promised program to guide the United States toward energy independence.In response to the battle erupting in the administration's highest councils, environmentalists and a key Democratic senator agreed Friday that Mr. Bush's energy program would be "dead on arrival" next month on Capitol Hill unless it contained conservation proposals.
BUSINESS
By David Connand Kim Clark | February 22, 1991
A bill to require gas and electric utilities to develop energy-conservation plans, and reward them for doing it, faced no opposition during a House of Delegates committee hearing in Annapolis yesterday.Even Maryland utilities, which would see the rules that govern how they make a profit change under the proposal, said they had no objection, since they are already coming up with similar plans voluntarily.One utility that operates in Maryland, Washington-based Potomac Electric Power Co., has already reached an agreement in principle with state regulators on an energy-conservation plan and is negotiating the details of what kind of conservation programs it will offer to Marylanders in the suburbs of Washington this summer.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
Brian O. Curran and John Spears see a revolution coming in energy conservation, and they are intent on helping companies lead the charge. And unlike in past efforts, conservationists have an important ally -- the utility companies.Energy Conservation Management Inc., formed by Mr. Curran and Mr. Spears in April, is one of a new breed of companies focusing exclusively on how to design and outfit buildings for the most efficient use of energy.While existing engineering and architectural firms advise clients on energy matters, only about a dozen firms nationwide solely work on energy conservation for buildings, according to William F. Lemke, executive director of the Energy Efficient Building Association, a Wausau, Wis.-based trade group.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Chestertown officials have been interested in energy conservation for a long time - they started tracking usage levels during the 1970s energy crisis. Even so, when the Eastern Shore town launched a project to cut back on electricity costs seven years ago, the municipality cut usage by 11 percent and sliced more than $130,000 in annual expenses. Now local leaders are hoping to expand on that success. They've launched the ShorePower Project with four other communities - Cambridge, Easton, Salisbury and Snow Hill - to help leaders in those places find ways to use energy more efficiently and with less impact on the environment.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Baltimore County will host a public meeting this week in Towson for nonprofits, government agencies and the public to discuss funding and spending priorities for community development programs aimed at social action, housing, child services and equal access. The meeting will be held at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at the Towson Library, 320 York Road, Towson. County staff will discuss grant opportunities and spending priorities targeted for homeless services; fair housing; removal of architectural barriers for persons with disabilities; and also projects aimed at low-income residents regarding employment, crime prevention, child care, health and welfare, education, substance abuse, energy conservation or recreational needs.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
The Baltimore Convention Center expects to save $18 million in energy costs over 15 years because of water and energy conservation renovations it announced Monday. Constellation, a division of energy provider Exelon Corp., will install the efficiency measures, according to a joint statement from the energy company and the convention center. Although the conservation efforts — along with other capital improvements planned for the center — come with a $10 million price tag, no money is required up front from the convention center, the statement said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Maryland will fall far short of meeting its goal to reduce energy consumption 15 percent by 2015 if state regulators and officials don't take aggressive action, according to an analysis by a nonprofit consumer group. Gov. Martin O'Malley outlined the goal to reduce per-capita electricity use in his first term, as utility bills were soaring and the state faced the possibility of rolling blackouts in the coming years. But according to the consumer advocacy group Maryland PIRG, three years later the state is on target to fail to meet even half that goal.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Carmera Thomas says she loves nature and majored in biology in college. But the job market's so tough, she's been working part time in a restaurant since graduating in May. Now the 22-year-old Glen Burnie woman is finally getting a chance to put her education and passion to work, under a new state program meant to train young people for jobs in environmental restoration and energy conservation while they perform community service. Thomas and 15 other applicants debuted Monday as the inaugural class of the Chesapeake Conservation Corps, which pairs young adults with watershed organizations, local or state agencies, and community groups for a year of work and learning.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Starting this summer, some Marylanders will have a new way to keep up with the Joneses — on saving energy, and money. The state Public Service Commission recently approved a pilot program by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. that will give 25,000 of its customers bimonthly reports that show how their energy habits stack up against those of 100 other ratepayers who live in similar dwellings and, in particular, the 20 percent of that group who use...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 1, 2006
A bill that would give Howard County residents a property tax credit for installation of solar or geothermal energy-saving equipment is to be introduced at Tuesday night's County Council meeting. Councilman Guy Guzzone, a North Laurel-Savage Democrat, is sponsoring the measure, which would limit the credits to $5,000 per house and $250,000 a year in the county overall, according to the legislation. The credit could not exceed the total property tax bill for a residence. Guzzone, who is running for House of Delegates, has vowed to introduce statewide credit legislation, if elected.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
ENERGY IS both source and limit of all we do. In an essay, "Why Big Fierce Animals Are Rare," ecologist Paul Colinvaux notes that the existence of top-of-the-food-web creatures - lions, tigers, great white sharks - "creates a theoretical possibility for other animals to evolve to eat them. "But the food calories to be won from hunting great white sharks and tigers are too few to support a minimum population of animals as large and horribly ferocious as these would have to be." One might argue that modern humans, with the heads of lions, tigers and sharks in their air-conditioned, dehumidified trophy rooms, are the energetic equivalents of Colinvaux's top predator-eating dragons.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
A new Baltimore County property tax credit rewards homeowners for making costly efficiency upgrades designed to save cash over time. The credit, which could save homeowners $1,800 over three years, covers improvements to heat and air conditioning systems, as well as upgrades to windows, insulation and roofing. The county council unanimously approved the credit in early June, and it took effect last week. The measure is intended to encourage improvements to existing homes by offering efficiency incentives similar to those for new construction.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
CALIFORNIA, Md. - - Approaching Evergreen Elementary, it's clear right away that there's something different about this new school. A pair of silo-like structures squats in front of the two-story brick building - cisterns storing rainwater for flushing the toilets. Then there are the cactuses and other plants growing atop the entrance canopy - put there to soak up more rain. Evergreen represents the latest in green school design in Maryland. The $20 million elementary school, which started classes last week in this woodsy, suburban community in St. Mary's County, has been designed and built to save bundles of energy and water, and to reduce the building's impact on nearby streams and wetlands.
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