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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 20, 2010
T he other night, my brother stood in my front hall and handed me a compliment. He told me my house felt warm. Leave it to family members to speak their minds. What he really meant was that my house is not chilly, the way it had been for the previous 30 winters. Although my home is built much like a classic Baltimore rowhouse, long and narrow, it is free-standing. Cold air leaked in on all four sides. And like many of Baltimore's aged homes (mine dates to the 1870s), it was expensive to heat.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Faced with the challenge of keeping a historic mansion warm for elderly residents while reining in costs, the nonprofit organization that operates the 18th-century Chase-Lloyd House in Annapolis is turning to 21st-century techniques to save the day. Chase Home Inc., an organization that runs the historic building as both housing for elderly women and a tourist attraction, recently contracted for an energy audit to determine if technology can help...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
The owner of a hard-to-heat 1923 Northeast Baltimore home became curious when she heard the news reports of weatherization assistance being offered through a federal economic stimulus recovery act. Beth Steinbach never raises her thermostat above 65 degrees in her Lauraville frame house. As the mother of four young children, she was looking for ways to get her winter utility bill below the $260 a month she was paying. So she called City Hall. A team of municipal draft busters spent several hours at her Southern Avenue home Tuesday.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Howard County residents can get free home energy audits paid for with federal stimulus money, county executive Ken Ulman announced Tuesday. Visiting a recently renovated home in Columbia where an audit was performed, Ulman said the county will use $659,000 of the $2.6 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to pay for the 1,669 audits over the next six months. "This program gives us the opportunity to offer homeowners the information they need to make smart energy decisions which will reduce the county's overall carbon footprint, and save homeowners money," Ulman said in a statement.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The moment of truth arrived last week in a green-and-white envelope - a BGE bill. I opened the invoice slowly, then ran to consult last year's records. It was like opening a report card or a set of SAT scores. For the past 30 winters, I've lived in a drafty, 1870s Baltimore house where each room registers a different temperature. An upstairs bedroom would be Miami and one a flight down will feel like Garrett County. When my father visits, he wears heavy sweaters. Some friends say I have a tape recorder to emulate the sound of a furnace running.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Faced with the challenge of keeping a historic mansion warm for elderly residents while reining in costs, the nonprofit organization that operates the 18th-century Chase-Lloyd House in Annapolis is turning to 21st-century techniques to save the day. Chase Home Inc., an organization that runs the historic building as both housing for elderly women and a tourist attraction, recently contracted for an energy audit to determine if technology can help...
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,LIZ.KAY@BALTSUN.COM | October 22, 2009
A donation of shareholder money from the parent of Maryland's largest utility will help fix aging furnaces for some low-income Baltimore homeowners struggling to pay home heating costs. Constellation Energy Group has partnered with Baltimore officials to donate $1 million to the Baltimore Community Foundation to replace or repair failing or broken heating systems over three years. The Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. Heating System Fund piggybacks on weatherization initiatives funded by federal stimulus dollars to install insulation, caulking around windows, water heater blankets and other steps to keep bills in check.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | June 11, 2007
Michael Sarbanes, a candidate for City Council president, plans to unveil a proposal today that he says would promote energy-efficiency measures to help residents reduce the impact of higher electricity rates, while also creating jobs. Sarbanes, a longtime community activist making his first run for public office, was to announce his proposal this morning, followed by a demonstration of an energy audit at a private residence. The proposal would encourage people to conduct an energy-efficiency audit on their homes, identifying passages where air escapes and targeting areas for sealing and insulation.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2002
ON MONDAY, Alyssa Stanek and Philip Rogers walked the halls at Harper's Choice Middle School armed with clipboards, digital and laser thermometers, and a foot-candle meter to measure light. The pair stopped in social studies teacher Brian Bradshaw's classroom to perform an energy audit -- taking temperature readings and measuring the amount of artificial and natural light in the room. Alyssa and Philip are members of the school's Energy Alliance Group, working with Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher Winnie McCulloch and Howard County public schools' energy management specialist Roy Michaelson to find ways to reduce energy use at the school.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Howard County residents can get free home energy audits paid for with federal stimulus money, county executive Ken Ulman announced Tuesday. Visiting a recently renovated home in Columbia where an audit was performed, Ulman said the county will use $659,000 of the $2.6 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to pay for the 1,669 audits over the next six months. "This program gives us the opportunity to offer homeowners the information they need to make smart energy decisions which will reduce the county's overall carbon footprint, and save homeowners money," Ulman said in a statement.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
River Hill High School science teacher Susan Lower trains her students to go to neighborhood homes in search of what she calls "vampires" — electrical devices that draw energy from homes even when they're turned off. Lower developed a program that trains students to audit homes for its environmental efficiency, helping homeowners explore their energy use habits to reduce consumption and energy bills. She said that since her program began in 2007, more than 150 students have participated and about 400 homes have been audited.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 20, 2010
T he other night, my brother stood in my front hall and handed me a compliment. He told me my house felt warm. Leave it to family members to speak their minds. What he really meant was that my house is not chilly, the way it had been for the previous 30 winters. Although my home is built much like a classic Baltimore rowhouse, long and narrow, it is free-standing. Cold air leaked in on all four sides. And like many of Baltimore's aged homes (mine dates to the 1870s), it was expensive to heat.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,LIZ.KAY@BALTSUN.COM | October 22, 2009
A donation of shareholder money from the parent of Maryland's largest utility will help fix aging furnaces for some low-income Baltimore homeowners struggling to pay home heating costs. Constellation Energy Group has partnered with Baltimore officials to donate $1 million to the Baltimore Community Foundation to replace or repair failing or broken heating systems over three years. The Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. Heating System Fund piggybacks on weatherization initiatives funded by federal stimulus dollars to install insulation, caulking around windows, water heater blankets and other steps to keep bills in check.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
The owner of a hard-to-heat 1923 Northeast Baltimore home became curious when she heard the news reports of weatherization assistance being offered through a federal economic stimulus recovery act. Beth Steinbach never raises her thermostat above 65 degrees in her Lauraville frame house. As the mother of four young children, she was looking for ways to get her winter utility bill below the $260 a month she was paying. So she called City Hall. A team of municipal draft busters spent several hours at her Southern Avenue home Tuesday.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The moment of truth arrived last week in a green-and-white envelope - a BGE bill. I opened the invoice slowly, then ran to consult last year's records. It was like opening a report card or a set of SAT scores. For the past 30 winters, I've lived in a drafty, 1870s Baltimore house where each room registers a different temperature. An upstairs bedroom would be Miami and one a flight down will feel like Garrett County. When my father visits, he wears heavy sweaters. Some friends say I have a tape recorder to emulate the sound of a furnace running.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | June 11, 2007
Michael Sarbanes, a candidate for City Council president, plans to unveil a proposal today that he says would promote energy-efficiency measures to help residents reduce the impact of higher electricity rates, while also creating jobs. Sarbanes, a longtime community activist making his first run for public office, was to announce his proposal this morning, followed by a demonstration of an energy audit at a private residence. The proposal would encourage people to conduct an energy-efficiency audit on their homes, identifying passages where air escapes and targeting areas for sealing and insulation.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
River Hill High School science teacher Susan Lower trains her students to go to neighborhood homes in search of what she calls "vampires" — electrical devices that draw energy from homes even when they're turned off. Lower developed a program that trains students to audit homes for its environmental efficiency, helping homeowners explore their energy use habits to reduce consumption and energy bills. She said that since her program began in 2007, more than 150 students have participated and about 400 homes have been audited.
EXPLORE
February 17, 2012
Westminster, Winfield students get lesson in energy efficiency Students at Westminster and Winfield elementary schools have been participating in the "BTU Crew" interactive program, conducted by a team of associates from Boland, an office of the Trane company. During this program, students explored how to make the buildings more energy efficient and sustainable. Students participated in hands-on lessons to discover how they can make an impact on energy efficiency and conservation while learning about green career options.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2002
ON MONDAY, Alyssa Stanek and Philip Rogers walked the halls at Harper's Choice Middle School armed with clipboards, digital and laser thermometers, and a foot-candle meter to measure light. The pair stopped in social studies teacher Brian Bradshaw's classroom to perform an energy audit -- taking temperature readings and measuring the amount of artificial and natural light in the room. Alyssa and Philip are members of the school's Energy Alliance Group, working with Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher Winnie McCulloch and Howard County public schools' energy management specialist Roy Michaelson to find ways to reduce energy use at the school.
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