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NEWS
March 25, 2011
Coverage of the offshore wind power legislation has missed one key point ("O'Malley wind plan meets resistance" March 24). The cost of wind power will remain constant over time. Because the wind is free, the price of electricity from wind turbines will not go up and down like a seesaw every time the market for fossil fuels has a hiccup. We have been gambling with our energy prices for too long by remaining overly dependent on fossil fuels and failing to develop alternative sources of power.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anirban Basu | October 13, 2014
Energy production has emerged as arguably the primary growth engine for America's economy. Oil production is surging, and the United States will emerge as the world's leading producer sometime this decade. America has already established self-sufficiency in natural gas, with the construction of many liquefied natural gas terminals that would export gas now under consideration. Wind and solar costs are falling, and America continues to be the largest producer of the globe's most reliable carbon free energy source: nuclear power.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011
Much to my dismay and disappointment, I have been informed that Gov. Martin O'Malley is hesitant to sign legislation reclassifying waste-to-energy incinerators as a preferred form of renewable energy in Maryland. Energy Answers International, the firm that is developing such a power plant in Fairfield, has "answered the bell" for necessary permits and financing to move forward with construction. The facility will burn recycled pellets, consisting of Maryland garbage, not coal or foreign oil. It will also utilize waste water, now headed into the Chesapeake Bay, from a treatment plant nearby to cool the incinerator.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 16, 2011
You might look forward to a vacation as a chance to unplug, but Consumer Reports recommends you take that advice literally. There are money-saving errands you might complete before leaving your home for a trip, such as eating up perishable groceries and putting vacation stops on your newspapers and mail. But don't neglect to unplug your idle appliances and turn down your water heater. You might remember this from previous discussions of 'vampire power', but electric-powered DVD players and battery chargers will all draw a constant amount of power even when you're not home.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson | December 23, 2013
The most lopsided loss during the Harbaugh era unfolded during a short week following a dramatic 18-16 win over the Detroit Lions. Ravens coach John Harbaugh acknowledged that the quick turnaround sapped the Ravens' energy. “It did, we felt it,” Harbaugh said. “We fought through it all week as best we could. Our guys were excited to play, and I thought the effort was there. They fought like crazy, but we just didn't have enough juice to pull it off. It's a legitimate factor.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lockheed Martin Corp. announced Tuesday that it signed a contract to develop the world's largest wave energy project off Victoria, Australia, calling it a "significant step toward making ocean energy commercially available. " The New Ventures office of Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training Baltimore site signed the deal with Victorian Wave Partners Ltd. to develop a 62.5-megawatt peak power wave energy generation project. The project will use a wave energy converter buoy pioneered by Ocean Power Technologies of Pennington, N.J. As the buoy moves up and down on waves, the mechanical energy drives an electrical generator, which is sent to shore through underwater cables.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
Columnist Robert Ehrlich's commentary on energy policy suggests that more oil exploration and drilling will lead to energy independence ("Road to energy independence goes through ANWR and Keystone," March 11). This is largely a myth perpetuated by fossil fuel companies and their political allies in order to enhance their bottom lines. In today's global economy, anything and everything is subject to being sold to the highest bidder. Canadian tar-sands oil, American off-shore oil, natural gas and even coal are no exceptions.
NEWS
February 16, 2012
Environmental expert Alex Pavlak pointed out some interesting facts regarding Governor O'Malley's offshore wind farm idea ("The energy is clean, but the system for getting it is not," Feb. 10). The governor's goal is to produce one-fifth of our energy needs by green methods by 2022. Mr. Pavlak points out that green energy costs roughly four times as much to produce as our current generators. A little simple math shows the average cost per kilowatt hour would double in today's dollars.
NEWS
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When homeowners Judy and Craig purchased 57 acres in Deale, Anne Arundel County, on which to build their dream home, they weren't building just a shelter from the elements or a place to keep their belongings. They were creating an environment that would be the foundation for a lifestyle. Judy, who had always wanted a farm, would finally have room to house her driving ponies and raise her own food. For Craig, an engineer, the new house would be an expression of his desire for a sustainable, energy-efficient lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
With as much electricity as there appeared to be at Camden Yards on Thursday night, it would be hard not to have a high-energy telecast. Give cable channel TBS credit for that: It did a solid job of communicating the color, excitement and sheer joy in the stands for the American League Division Series opener as the Orioles beat the Detroit Tigers, 12-3. It might seem like an obvious choice, but coming out of commercials time and again with hand-held cameras in the face of fans in full orange-and-black regalia as they clapped, cheered and waved signs was definitely the way to go. I loved the field-level shots looking up into the stands.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Peter John Vogelberger Jr., a retired nuclear engineer and past president of Teledyne Energy Systems who headed the development of devices used in 1970s space exploration, died of undetermined causes Sept. 7 at his Lutherville home. He was 82. Born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Peter J. Vogelberger Sr. and the former Agnes Snyderwine. A standout high school athlete, he was recruited to the Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Class of 1954 and was an honors graduate.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 21, 2014
CLEVELAND -- The Ravens secondary couldn't cover and tackle - and gave up a long pass that will be on every NFL highlight package this week. The linebackers had trouble getting off blocks and holding the edge on running plays. The defensive line wasn't much of a factor, either. And the Ravens still won. On a day when their defense was atrocious, the Ravens won because they played a team that always finds a way to lose. And if they don't find one, the Cleveland Browns will invent one. As the Ravens walked out of FirstEnergy Stadium on Sunday evening, they realized they were lucky to win and the best team might have lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
I have to admit I was not overjoyed at the thought of spending the Ravens' season opener with the fourth-string CBS broadcasting team of Spero Dedes and Solomon Wilcots. But I only wish now that the Ravens had done as well Sunday as Wilcots, Dedes and CBS Sports did. While the Ravens lost 23-16 to the Cincinnati Bengals thanks to too many mistakes to even keep track of, CBS Sports had a solid opener from its revamped pre-game show with Bart Scott and Tony Gonzalez to the game coverage from M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will use $52 million from a state grant to bolster Baltimore's energy conservation efforts, including improving education and outreach efforts. The goal of the Baltimore Energy Initiative, announced this week by the mayor's office, is to reduce energy use in the city and promote local investment. Money from the initiative will give some city residents free in-home installation of programmable thermostats, pipe wraps and other energy and water conservation equipment.
EXPLORE
By Lindsey McPherson | August 28, 2012
Tammy Bowers left nothing to chance when Lexie, her 8-year-old Labradoodle, was scheduled to have several cancerous tumors removed two years ago. Before surgery and again after, the Howard County resident made appointments for Lexie to see Shari Sternberger, a local energy worker. At her Elements of Energy studio in Highland, Sternberger uses a combination of holistic methods to treat animals (and humans) for everything from pain to anxiety to skin conditions. “Shari actually treated her before her surgery and after her surgery,” Bowers says.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
I asked my German son-in-law how his brother's new home in Hamburg was coming along. He said that the government supports his use of all of the existing modern technologies of geothermal, solar and wind, high efficiency insulation, windows, and appliances to reduce energy costs. Thus, one of the most powerful economies in the world can seamlessly decide to close all nuclear plants within the decade without a ripple from their populace because they have been preparing for the future.
NEWS
By Ruth Ann Norton and Deron Lovaas | August 12, 2014
As Maryland considers options for cutting climate-warming emissions from existing power plants, the good news is we're already ahead of most other states in meeting new targets proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. But let's not rest on our laurels. Thanks to energy efficiency programs being developed in the coming months, we can deliver energy savings to more Marylanders, benefiting all our families and communities. Now is the time to contact Gov. Martin O'Malley to remind him how important it is to ramp up work by our utilities and state agencies to deliver energy efficiency, which reduces the need to generate electricity with fuels that create the carbon pollution that harms our health and planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Robin Williams was one of the most original, daring and troubled comedians to ever work in television. When he first burst on the screen, you held your breath as you watched him dance out there on a manic tightrope of improvisation. But after a while, you stopped wondering how he did it and learned to just enjoy the high of seeing him soar. The 63-year-old comedian and actor was found dead Monday at his home in Tiburon, Calif., north of San Francisco. The cause of death is suspected to be suicide by asphyxiation, according to the Marin County coroner's office.
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