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By Adam Teicher and Kansas City Star | January 5, 2011
The Chiefs made an interesting roster move, signing veteran wide receiver Kevin Curtis. Curtis may well have nothing left. He's 32 and played in just two games this season with Miami and caught one pass for six yards. But as recently as 2007 he caught 77 passes with six TDs for the Eagles. The Chiefs obviously believe Curtis has something left, so this signing bears watching. The Chiefs placed injured defensive back Donald Washington on injured reserve. They also signed tight end Cody Slate to their practice squad.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
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SPORTS
By Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
In some ways, the Browns were asking for this when they went with such a young roster. By this, I mean losing. By this, I mean agitation. By this, I mean asking a beaten-down, impatient fan base to just wait because going young is the best way to build a team. It is the wisest road, assuming the young players have talent. For the full story, go to Cleveland.com
EXPLORE
By Pat Farmer | December 6, 2012
We commemorate the surprise attack by the Japanese on the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941. The attack forced the United States entry into World War II. Americans, who grew up during the difficult times of the Great Depression and then fought in World War II, and those at home whose productivity and contributions to the war effort, are often called "The Greatest Generation. " This term was actually coined by journalist Tom Brokaw for the title of his book published in 1998.
SPORTS
By Tom Reed, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
Brandon Weeden has shown the ability to throw the deep ball, but completing it is another matter. Since his second pass of the season sailed over the head of a streaking Mohamed Massaquoi, the Browns' rookie quarterback has struggled with his long throws, particularly to the right side of the field. Weeden did not complete a pass on four tries down the right side Sunday that traveled 21-plus yards, according to The Plain Dealer's Dennis Manoloff, who is charting all the quarterback's passes this season.
EXPLORE
By Pat Farmer | December 6, 2012
We commemorate the surprise attack by the Japanese on the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941. The attack forced the United States entry into World War II. Americans, who grew up during the difficult times of the Great Depression and then fought in World War II, and those at home whose productivity and contributions to the war effort, are often called "The Greatest Generation. " This term was actually coined by journalist Tom Brokaw for the title of his book published in 1998.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The way military historian Trevor Dupuy sees it, the lesson of the gulf war is as ancient as warfare itself."The most important lesson is that the fundamental principles of war that were valid at the time of Alexander the Great were as true today as they ever were: mobility, mass and maneuver," Mr. Dupuy said. And because the United States adhered closely to all three, he said, Operation Desert Storm "was probably as close to a flawless operation as has ever been done."It also didn't hurt to have secret warriors on the prowl behind enemy lines in the desert, unsung robotic simulators that helped train pilots to "Top Gun" sharpness, up-to-the-minute satellite photos of practically every enemy position, warplanes free to roam wherever they wanted and an opposing commander as rigid as the Sphinx.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 30, 2001
Behind Enemy Lines is all guts and all glory and not much sense. Which, come to think of it, may be a concise - if a tad idealized - description of war itself. What that means is a lot of things get blown up real good, there's a trapped airman running from the bad guys, and there are all sorts of opportunities for heroism. It's plenty thrilling, and it appeals to the flag-waving patriot in all of us. Think about the movie too hard when it's all over, however, and your brain may start to hurt.
EXPLORE
August 11, 2011
It's easy to lose sight of the reality that Harford County -   like the whole of Maryland - is ground zero for U.S. History. A key part of that history was recalled over the weekend at  St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Abingdon, where there was a ceremony to mark the graves of Confederate States of America soldiers buried there. While the land of the Lords Baltimore wasn't much of a hot spot in the Revolution, it was the key battleground for the War of 1812. Indeed, few Marylanders need be reminded that Key, Francis Scott, that is, penned the national anthem during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Chris Hedges and Chris Hedges,New York Times | February 15, 1991
IN SAUDI ARABIA -- In an age of lasers and computers, of guided missiles and smart bombs, the intimate tragedy of war perhaps seems most apparent when seen through the sights of a sniper's rifle."
SPORTS
By Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer | September 28, 2012
I know, the Browns lost 23-16 to the Ravens -- and pro football is all about the bottom line. Win or go home. And the Browns returned home at 0-4 this season. But let's be realistic about this game. The Browns were playing a legitimate Super Bowl contender on a field where Baltimore had won 20 of its last 21 games before Thursday night. Joe Flacco has matured from a good quarterback to one of the best in the NFL. The Ravens entered the night averaging 33 points a game, and doing it against New England, Cincinnati and Philadelphia.
SPORTS
By Terry Pluto, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
In some ways, the Browns were asking for this when they went with such a young roster. By this, I mean losing. By this, I mean agitation. By this, I mean asking a beaten-down, impatient fan base to just wait because going young is the best way to build a team. It is the wisest road, assuming the young players have talent. For the full story, go to Cleveland.com
SPORTS
By Tom Reed, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
Brandon Weeden has shown the ability to throw the deep ball, but completing it is another matter. Since his second pass of the season sailed over the head of a streaking Mohamed Massaquoi, the Browns' rookie quarterback has struggled with his long throws, particularly to the right side of the field. Weeden did not complete a pass on four tries down the right side Sunday that traveled 21-plus yards, according to The Plain Dealer's Dennis Manoloff, who is charting all the quarterback's passes this season.
SPORTS
By Mike Chappell and Indianapolis Star | December 8, 2011
If ever a city was bracing itself to revel in a healthy dose of karma, it's Baltimore. The city spurned by Colts owner Robert Irsay in March 1984 once again welcomes the Indianapolis version to M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday. The Ravens are 9-3 and battling the Pittsburgh Steelers, Houston Texans and New England Patriots for the AFC's No. 1 playoff seed. The Colts? They're 0-12 for only the second time in the club's 59-year history and in jeopardy of joining the 2008 Detroit Lions as the NFL's only 0-16 teams.
EXPLORE
August 11, 2011
It's easy to lose sight of the reality that Harford County -   like the whole of Maryland - is ground zero for U.S. History. A key part of that history was recalled over the weekend at  St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Abingdon, where there was a ceremony to mark the graves of Confederate States of America soldiers buried there. While the land of the Lords Baltimore wasn't much of a hot spot in the Revolution, it was the key battleground for the War of 1812. Indeed, few Marylanders need be reminded that Key, Francis Scott, that is, penned the national anthem during the War of 1812.
SPORTS
By Gene Collier, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | January 15, 2011
For his first rhetorical flourish of the postseason, Mike Tomlin illuminated the major theme of its premiere episode without even knowing it last Monday. The Baltimore Ravens have a knack, he emphasized at the outset of his weekly news conference, for "creating fumble opportunities. " Was that a capsule scouting report, or some kind of para-mentalist stunt? Here we are four fumbles later, one of them so bizarre that 21 of the 22 players on the Heinz Field lawn failed to recognize it as a fumble or an opportunity, but the narrative created by those four blunders fueled an electrifying 31-24 Steelers victory in ways comic, dramatic and, ultimately, heroic.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1995
Wayne Karlin would have killed her, of course. Had he spotted Le Minh Khue down in the jungle by the Ho Chi Minh Trail he'd have aimed the machine gun out the side of the helicopter and opened fire.This occurred to the former U.S. Marine as he looked at Ms. Le, erstwhile member of a North Vietnamese Army Brigade, seated before him at breakfast in a house just south of Boston. Both had come to New England as fellow writers and veterans to a conference on war and writing about war.Suddenly there was the enemy's face, which Mr. Karlin had never seen in 13 months at war in South Vietnam.
SPORTS
By Gene Collier, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | January 11, 2011
That the Steelers' postseason will begin and possibly end with still another lowbrow argument with the Baltimore Ravens isn't terribly surprising, nor should it in any way be disappointing. But in one not terribly significant way, I think it is. It's like finding out after months of planning and too many hours of anticipatory speculation that, oh yeah, you're going to the prom but the first thing on the program is an alley fight out back. What, again? There goes that deposit on the tux. We've pretty much established that the Steelers-Ravens matchup presents its own hyper-violent genre of competition, football on the far edges of sanity.
SPORTS
By Ed Bouchette, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | January 10, 2011
Among the rewards the Steelers earned for achieving the No. 2 seed in the AFC was a bye into the divisional round of the playoffs and a home game. But are home games worth much these days? The first weekend of playoffs in the NFL left three home teams at home permanently as Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Kansas City lost in their own stadiums. And that does not even take into account what the Steelers have done at home this season. They were 5-3 at Heinz Field, 7-1 on the road.
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