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By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it has received permission from the Food and Drug Administration to begin testing one of its much anticipated experimental anti-cancer drugs in humans, and expects the small trial to begin in September.The Rockville biotechnology company had not planned to seek FDA approval to test its Endostatin protein until September at the earliest. The experimental drug has shown promise in animal studies by blocking tumor growth.Dr. John W. Holaday, EntreMed's chairman, president and chief executive officer, said the company was able to move up the time frame because of an "aggressive development schedule," which included completing and compiling data from required animal testing earlier than anticipated.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
EntreMed Inc. said it began a clinical trial yesterday in which cancer patients are injecting themselves at home with the anti-tumor drug Endostatin. The trial, for patients with neuroendocrine tumors, is the latest step in the company's attempt to develop cancer drugs that are free of side effects. The aim is to make cancer a manageable disease, much like diabetes. EntreMed expects 32 patients to enroll in the Endostatin trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. The Phase II trial, focused on measuring the drug's effectiveness, is the second of three phases of human testing required by the Food and Drug Administration.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that plans to get one of its experimental anti-cancer drugs into human trials next year remain on track despite a published report that cancer experts have been unable to verify test results showing it shrinks tumors in mice.Shares in the Rockville-based biotechnology company plunged $7.75 -- more than 23 percent -- to $24.875 as investors reacted to a front-page Wall Street Journal article. More than 2.8 million shares traded hands, about 50 times the average trading volume.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
EntreMed Inc. has made a key finding about how its well-publicized drug Endostatin works to block the growth of tumor-feeding blood vessels, a development the company hopes will allow it to strengthen patents and look for other new drugs that work in a similar way. The discovery was made by scientists at the Rockville-based drug developer and published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the company announced yesterday....
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it expects to begin human trials of its anti-cancer drug Endostatin this fall, launching a process that will answer at last whether the experimental treatment is a breakthrough drug for the illness.EntreMed and the National Cancer Institute, which is assisting EntreMed with the study and development of Endostatin, plan to test the compound on a broad range of cancer patients, as is normally done with promising new cancer treatments. The NCI said it plans to test the drug on patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients diagnosed with cancers of the breast, prostate and colon, as well as lung lymphomas.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
EntreMed Inc. has made a key finding about how its well-publicized drug Endostatin works to block the growth of tumor-feeding blood vessels, a development the company hopes will allow it to strengthen patents and look for other new drugs that work in a similar way. The discovery was made by scientists at the Rockville-based drug developer and published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the company announced yesterday....
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
The prospects for Endostatin, EntreMed Inc.'s highly publicized anti-tumor drug, have propelled the company's shares to breathtaking gains and losses over the past two years. But yesterday, after the company presented what its executives said were positive results from the first human tests of the drug, the market gave only a cautious shrug. The results pushed shares up $4.13 to $33.38 on the Nasdaq stock market, a 14 percent increase that fell short of EntreMed's $38 close a week ago. The test reports added details to summaries released earlier this week that support researchers' arguments that the drug appears remarkably safe and holds promise in treating cancer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it had begun more advanced human tests of its anti-cancer drug Endostatin, seeking to gauge its effectiveness as well as its safety. The clinical trial at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston will involve up to 30 patients who will receive Endostatin via continuous infusion, a method that pumps the drug from a small, wearable cassette into the patient. While patients with a number of different tumor types will be accepted, EntreMed President Edward R. Gubish Jr. said about half will have sarcoma or melanoma, cancers in which Endostatin showed signs of promise during earlier trials focused on safety.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
EntreMed Inc. said it began a clinical trial yesterday in which cancer patients are injecting themselves at home with the anti-tumor drug Endostatin. The trial, for patients with neuroendocrine tumors, is the latest step in the company's attempt to develop cancer drugs that are free of side effects. The aim is to make cancer a manageable disease, much like diabetes. EntreMed expects 32 patients to enroll in the Endostatin trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. The Phase II trial, focused on measuring the drug's effectiveness, is the second of three phases of human testing required by the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
Early summaries from the first human tests of EntreMed Inc.'s highly touted anti-tumor drug Endostatin suggest that the drug is safe. One of the summaries shows that cancer stopped progressing in several patients while the disease regressed in at least one. But EntreMed's shares fell $4 yesterday, or 10.5 percent, to $34 on the news, which was contained in summaries released at the beginning of this week's scientific conference on new cancer drugs in...
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it had begun more advanced human tests of its anti-cancer drug Endostatin, seeking to gauge its effectiveness as well as its safety. The clinical trial at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston will involve up to 30 patients who will receive Endostatin via continuous infusion, a method that pumps the drug from a small, wearable cassette into the patient. While patients with a number of different tumor types will be accepted, EntreMed President Edward R. Gubish Jr. said about half will have sarcoma or melanoma, cancers in which Endostatin showed signs of promise during earlier trials focused on safety.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
The prospects for Endostatin, EntreMed Inc.'s highly publicized anti-tumor drug, have propelled the company's shares to breathtaking gains and losses over the past two years. But yesterday, after the company presented what its executives said were positive results from the first human tests of the drug, the market gave only a cautious shrug. The results pushed shares up $4.13 to $33.38 on the Nasdaq stock market, a 14 percent increase that fell short of EntreMed's $38 close a week ago. The test reports added details to summaries released earlier this week that support researchers' arguments that the drug appears remarkably safe and holds promise in treating cancer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
Early summaries from the first human tests of EntreMed Inc.'s highly touted anti-tumor drug Endostatin suggest that the drug is safe. One of the summaries shows that cancer stopped progressing in several patients while the disease regressed in at least one. But EntreMed's shares fell $4 yesterday, or 10.5 percent, to $34 on the news, which was contained in summaries released at the beginning of this week's scientific conference on new cancer drugs in...
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it has received permission from the Food and Drug Administration to begin testing one of its much anticipated experimental anti-cancer drugs in humans, and expects the small trial to begin in September.The Rockville biotechnology company had not planned to seek FDA approval to test its Endostatin protein until September at the earliest. The experimental drug has shown promise in animal studies by blocking tumor growth.Dr. John W. Holaday, EntreMed's chairman, president and chief executive officer, said the company was able to move up the time frame because of an "aggressive development schedule," which included completing and compiling data from required animal testing earlier than anticipated.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it expects to begin human trials of its anti-cancer drug Endostatin this fall, launching a process that will answer at last whether the experimental treatment is a breakthrough drug for the illness.EntreMed and the National Cancer Institute, which is assisting EntreMed with the study and development of Endostatin, plan to test the compound on a broad range of cancer patients, as is normally done with promising new cancer treatments. The NCI said it plans to test the drug on patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients diagnosed with cancers of the breast, prostate and colon, as well as lung lymphomas.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that plans to get one of its experimental anti-cancer drugs into human trials next year remain on track despite a published report that cancer experts have been unable to verify test results showing it shrinks tumors in mice.Shares in the Rockville-based biotechnology company plunged $7.75 -- more than 23 percent -- to $24.875 as investors reacted to a front-page Wall Street Journal article. More than 2.8 million shares traded hands, about 50 times the average trading volume.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
One day after bad news about one promising cancer drug sent EntreMed Inc.'s shares tumbling, the Rockville biotechnology company's stock roared back yesterday after good news about another cancer drug.Shares doubled, rising $12.8125 to $25.6875, after government researchers said they had reproduced Dr. Judah Folkman's use of endostatin to shrink lung tumors in mice. On Wednesday, the company's shares fell $11.625, or 47 percent, after Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. pulled out of an agreement with EntreMed to develop angiostatin.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO - Shares of EntreMed Inc. fell nearly 21 percent yesterday after results of the first human tests of its two anti-tumor drugs failed to ignite investors' enthusiasm. The scientific presentations Sunday and yesterday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's meeting here marked the first release of complete results from Phase I clinical trials for Endostatin and Angiostatin. Investors reacted negatively, despite what the company and independent scientific investigators described as positive results.
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