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BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 17, 1994
As a new gastroenterologist in town in the late 1980s, Mark D. Noar was drawing "horrible" time slots in hospital endoscopy suites. His solution: Buy the equipment himself and treat patients in his own office.Last week, his four-year battle to conduct procedures in his office for the convenience of himself and his patients ended successfully when hospitals lost their bid to close him down.The battle was heated because such centers, with their lower rates, could drain business from hospitals as insurance companies push for lower costs.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
It sounds like something out of a James Bond movie: a pill-sized gadget equipped with two cameras, each of which takes seven photos a second and transmits them wirelessly to a nearby storage device. But the only thing this gadget will spy on is your esophagus. Known as the Pillcam ESO, the high-tech capsule is gaining fans among patients and doctors as a comfortable, convenient alternative to endoscopy. "It's ridiculously easy to use," says Dr. Blair Lewis, a gastroenterologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.
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HEALTH
October 2, 1990
P. Gayle O'Callaghan, Psy.D., was elected president of the Maryland Psychological Association Sept. 1.Neil Kirschner, Ph.D., is president-elect.*Paul C. Brophy and James T. Cavanaugh 3d were named to the board of trustees at Mercy Medical Center.*Mary Rogers, R.N. has been promoted to nurse manager of North Arundel Hospital's Endoscopy Unit.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | February 1, 1994
January and February seem to be high season for doctors who recommend those medical-torture tests. They wait until after the holiday -- after all, they don't want to miss Christmas, either.So, think about it before you report another bad headache or tummy ache. You may find yourself wrapped, slapped then zapped onto a cold table with just a cheap paper gown open at the back so somebody you never saw before can photograph some private part of you, a part that you'd never worried much about before, or seen inside.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 4, 1994
An unusual attempt by hospitals to close down four independent endoscopy centers that are taking away patients ran into a roadblock yesterday when a hearing officer concluded the centers had been properly opened.In a motion filed Sept. 21, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and St. Joseph Hospital had argued that four gastroendoscopy centers that have opened in the region since late 1992 should have undergone the review process that typically accompanies the opening of new medical centers.In rejecting the complaint, Joan Y. Harris, a member of the Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission, ruled that the centers are nonsurgical ambulatory facilities and, thus, exempt from the process of determining need before a health care facility can open.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
As Dr. Lewis Newberg operated on the sinuses of a Pasadena woman last week, two trademark characteristics became apparent -- a desire for innovation and a quirky sense of humor.Using a new instrument for the first time in the United States, Dr. Newberg removed infected tissue from the woman's sinuses, opening up passages to alleviate chronic headaches and allow her to breathe freely again.The work was slow going -- the operation took four hours instead of two, as originally expected.When the procedure, performed at Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore, was finally finished, the veteran surgeon turned to an observer and asked: "So, did you enjoy watching me pick a patient's nose?"
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
As Dr. Lewis Newberg operated on the sinuses of a Pasadena woman last week, two trademark characteristics became apparent -- a desire for innovation and a quirky sense of humor.Using a new instrument for the first time in the United States, Dr. Newberg removed infected tissue from the woman's sinuses, opening up passages to alleviate chronic headaches and allow her to breath freely again.The work was slow going -- the operation took four hours instead of two, as originally expected.When the procedure, performed at Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore, was finally finished, the veteran surgeon turned to an observer and asked: "So, did you enjoy watching me pick a patient's nose?"
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | June 25, 1991
Three days before Thanksgiving 1986, Jay H. Mandell -- a 43-year-old Pikesville business executive -- was struck by severe chest pain as he drove home from work. The pain radiated to his left arm and was so excruciating that he was forced to pull off the road.Within the next two days, two doctors told Mandell, the owner of an office and building maintenance company, not to worry. They gave him antacid pills. They said he had indigestion.On Thanksgiving Day, after repeated calls reporting his worsening condition to his physician, Dr. Stephen Glasser, Mandell drove himself to Sinai Hospital.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
It sounds like something out of a James Bond movie: a pill-sized gadget equipped with two cameras, each of which takes seven photos a second and transmits them wirelessly to a nearby storage device. But the only thing this gadget will spy on is your esophagus. Known as the Pillcam ESO, the high-tech capsule is gaining fans among patients and doctors as a comfortable, convenient alternative to endoscopy. "It's ridiculously easy to use," says Dr. Blair Lewis, a gastroenterologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | February 1, 1994
January and February seem to be high season for doctors who recommend those medical-torture tests. They wait until after the holiday -- after all, they don't want to miss Christmas, either.So, think about it before you report another bad headache or tummy ache. You may find yourself wrapped, slapped then zapped onto a cold table with just a cheap paper gown open at the back so somebody you never saw before can photograph some private part of you, a part that you'd never worried much about before, or seen inside.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 17, 1994
As a new gastroenterologist in town in the late 1980s, Mark D. Noar was drawing "horrible" time slots in hospital endoscopy suites. His solution: Buy the equipment himself and treat patients in his own office.Last week, his four-year battle to conduct procedures in his office for the convenience of himself and his patients ended successfully when hospitals lost their bid to close him down.The battle was heated because such centers, with their lower rates, could drain business from hospitals as insurance companies push for lower costs.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
A plea by Baltimore hospitals to close down four outpatient centers competing for their business was rejected by a state planning commission yesterday, but the panel agreed to take up the larger issue of when and how to regulate the growing number of free-standing facilities.At issue yesterday was a decision by state planners to allow four endoscopy centers to open in the past year and a half without being subject to a needs test. The centers provide certain nonsurgical endoscopy procedures at a lower cost than hospital-based outpatient centers.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 4, 1994
An unusual attempt by hospitals to close down four independent endoscopy centers that are taking away patients ran into a roadblock yesterday when a hearing officer concluded the centers had been properly opened.In a motion filed Sept. 21, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and St. Joseph Hospital had argued that four gastroendoscopy centers that have opened in the region since late 1992 should have undergone the review process that typically accompanies the opening of new medical centers.In rejecting the complaint, Joan Y. Harris, a member of the Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission, ruled that the centers are nonsurgical ambulatory facilities and, thus, exempt from the process of determining need before a health care facility can open.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
As Dr. Lewis Newberg operated on the sinuses of a Pasadena woman last week, two trademark characteristics became apparent -- a desire for innovation and a quirky sense of humor.Using a new instrument for the first time in the United States, Dr. Newberg removed infected tissue from the woman's sinuses, opening up passages to alleviate chronic headaches and allow her to breathe freely again.The work was slow going -- the operation took four hours instead of two, as originally expected.When the procedure, performed at Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore, was finally finished, the veteran surgeon turned to an observer and asked: "So, did you enjoy watching me pick a patient's nose?"
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
As Dr. Lewis Newberg operated on the sinuses of a Pasadena woman last week, two trademark characteristics became apparent -- a desire for innovation and a quirky sense of humor.Using a new instrument for the first time in the United States, Dr. Newberg removed infected tissue from the woman's sinuses, opening up passages to alleviate chronic headaches and allow her to breath freely again.The work was slow going -- the operation took four hours instead of two, as originally expected.When the procedure, performed at Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore, was finally finished, the veteran surgeon turned to an observer and asked: "So, did you enjoy watching me pick a patient's nose?"
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | June 25, 1991
Three days before Thanksgiving 1986, Jay H. Mandell -- a 43-year-old Pikesville business executive -- was struck by severe chest pain as he drove home from work. The pain radiated to his left arm and was so excruciating that he was forced to pull off the road.Within the next two days, two doctors told Mandell, the owner of an office and building maintenance company, not to worry. They gave him antacid pills. They said he had indigestion.On Thanksgiving Day, after repeated calls reporting his worsening condition to his physician, Dr. Stephen Glasser, Mandell drove himself to Sinai Hospital.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
A plea by Baltimore hospitals to close down four outpatient centers competing for their business was rejected by a state planning commission yesterday, but the panel agreed to take up the larger issue of when and how to regulate the growing number of free-standing facilities.At issue yesterday was a decision by state planners to allow four endoscopy centers to open in the past year and a half without being subject to a needs test. The centers provide certain nonsurgical endoscopy procedures at a lower cost than hospital-based outpatient centers.
NEWS
October 13, 1992
Health Center temporarily closesThe Glen Burnie Health Center at 416 A St. is undergoing renovation for approximately the next four months and is closed. In the meantime, the Health Center will be holding the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) food supplement program and health service clinics at the Department of Utilities Building, at 7409 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd.The last WIC services at the A takes place Friday and resumes at the Baltimore-Annapolis location Oct. 20.All other services begin at the temporary location Oct. 27.Information: 222-7272.
HEALTH
October 2, 1990
P. Gayle O'Callaghan, Psy.D., was elected president of the Maryland Psychological Association Sept. 1.Neil Kirschner, Ph.D., is president-elect.*Paul C. Brophy and James T. Cavanaugh 3d were named to the board of trustees at Mercy Medical Center.*Mary Rogers, R.N. has been promoted to nurse manager of North Arundel Hospital's Endoscopy Unit.
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