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Endometriosis

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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
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NEWS
September 21, 2013
Thank you to reporter Andrea Walker and Dr. Michael Giudice for shining a light on the painful effects of endometriosis (" Endometriosis can lead to infertility ," Sept. 19). Because of the difficulty in diagnosing it, endometriosis often goes undiagnosed or worse, misdiagnosed. Patients who receive a wrong diagnosis will often suffer so much more with the wrong treatment options. Education and empowerment are the key. Patients need to be trained to ask the right questions, know their family and medical history, and not hesitate to seek a second opinion.
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NEWS
September 21, 2013
Thank you to reporter Andrea Walker and Dr. Michael Giudice for shining a light on the painful effects of endometriosis (" Endometriosis can lead to infertility ," Sept. 19). Because of the difficulty in diagnosing it, endometriosis often goes undiagnosed or worse, misdiagnosed. Patients who receive a wrong diagnosis will often suffer so much more with the wrong treatment options. Education and empowerment are the key. Patients need to be trained to ask the right questions, know their family and medical history, and not hesitate to seek a second opinion.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | December 13, 1994
Q: In the past several years, since turning 25, I have had gradually worsening pain before and during each menstrual period. My doctor believes that my pain may be due to endometriosis, and she has recommended a laparoscopy. I am hesitant to undergo this procedure unless it will help to eliminate or reduce my pain. What do you advise?A: Endometriosis is the growth of endometrial tissue (the tissue that normally lines the uterus) outside the uterine cavity in such places as the fallopian tubes, ovaries, other organs in the pelvis, and even more widely throughout the abdomen.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | October 19, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A drug commonly used to treat circulatory disorders may prove to be an effective new therapy for infertility caused by endometriosis, an often painful condition suffered by millions of women worldwide, researchers said yesterday.In a study directed by Dr. Alex Steinleitner of Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, researchers induced endometriosis in hamsters. All hamsters subsequently given the drug pentoxifylline became fertile, and none of the untreated animals became pregnant, said Dr. Steinleitner, who is co-director of Mount Sinai's in-vitro fertilization program.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2005
How important is it to stretch before or after exercise? Coaches and exercise gurus have long advocated stretching before exercise to avoid injuries. But what little research there is doesn't support that idea. Instead, experts suggest stretching after you're warmed up to increase overall flexibility. In a paper published last year in the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, researchers from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed the limited number of studies available and concluded that "stretching had no effect in reducing injuries."
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | January 31, 2008
As many women postpone having a baby until later in their lives, some will face infertility. But infertility is treatable through a variety of therapies, says Howard A. Zacur, director of Johns Hopkins Medicine's Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. How many women are affected by fertility problems? Roughly 10 percent of women in the United States who are trying to become pregnant are affected, and this percentage has been relatively stable over time. Medically speaking, how is infertility defined?
NEWS
By Judy Foreman Judy Foreman Judy Foreman | November 3, 2006
Christina Shimek, a senior at St. Bernard's High School in Fitchburg, Mass., is only 17, but she has already experienced more pain than many adults have to bear in a lifetime. A year ago, Christina said, she woke up one morning "in excruciating pain in my lower back and pelvic area. I was in tears." Frantic, her parents took her to the hospital, where doctors assumed the trouble was her appendix and took it out. But the appendix turned out to be normal. The pain persisted. She missed school for four months, had to repeat chemistry and missed an important rite of passage, her "junior ring ceremony," in which students get their class rings.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Sun | August 21, 2008
About a month before last summer's Iron Girl Triathlon, Melissa Emery was beset by debilitating fatigue. She had taken part in the Columbia event's debut in August 2006, a year after turning 40 and finding herself in the throes of a midlife crisis. Completing her first swim-bike-run event proved she could handle the demanding preparation and physical exertion, so she continued to push herself. But when she started to bog down last summer, Emery wondered: "Am I training too much?" She soon learned that the training regimen wasn't the culprit.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Sun | August 21, 2008
About a month before last summer's Iron Girl Triathlon, Melissa Emery was beset by debilitating fatigue. She had taken part in the Columbia event's debut in August 2006, a year after turning 40 and finding herself in the throes of a midlife crisis. Completing her first swim-bike-run event proved she could handle the demanding preparation and physical exertion, so she continued to push herself. But when she started to bog down last summer, Emery wondered: "Am I training too much?" She soon learned that the training regimen wasn't the culprit.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | January 31, 2008
As many women postpone having a baby until later in their lives, some will face infertility. But infertility is treatable through a variety of therapies, says Howard A. Zacur, director of Johns Hopkins Medicine's Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. How many women are affected by fertility problems? Roughly 10 percent of women in the United States who are trying to become pregnant are affected, and this percentage has been relatively stable over time. Medically speaking, how is infertility defined?
NEWS
By Judy Foreman Judy Foreman Judy Foreman | November 3, 2006
Christina Shimek, a senior at St. Bernard's High School in Fitchburg, Mass., is only 17, but she has already experienced more pain than many adults have to bear in a lifetime. A year ago, Christina said, she woke up one morning "in excruciating pain in my lower back and pelvic area. I was in tears." Frantic, her parents took her to the hospital, where doctors assumed the trouble was her appendix and took it out. But the appendix turned out to be normal. The pain persisted. She missed school for four months, had to repeat chemistry and missed an important rite of passage, her "junior ring ceremony," in which students get their class rings.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2005
How important is it to stretch before or after exercise? Coaches and exercise gurus have long advocated stretching before exercise to avoid injuries. But what little research there is doesn't support that idea. Instead, experts suggest stretching after you're warmed up to increase overall flexibility. In a paper published last year in the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, researchers from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed the limited number of studies available and concluded that "stretching had no effect in reducing injuries."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | December 13, 1994
Q: In the past several years, since turning 25, I have had gradually worsening pain before and during each menstrual period. My doctor believes that my pain may be due to endometriosis, and she has recommended a laparoscopy. I am hesitant to undergo this procedure unless it will help to eliminate or reduce my pain. What do you advise?A: Endometriosis is the growth of endometrial tissue (the tissue that normally lines the uterus) outside the uterine cavity in such places as the fallopian tubes, ovaries, other organs in the pelvis, and even more widely throughout the abdomen.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | October 19, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A drug commonly used to treat circulatory disorders may prove to be an effective new therapy for infertility caused by endometriosis, an often painful condition suffered by millions of women worldwide, researchers said yesterday.In a study directed by Dr. Alex Steinleitner of Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, researchers induced endometriosis in hamsters. All hamsters subsequently given the drug pentoxifylline became fertile, and none of the untreated animals became pregnant, said Dr. Steinleitner, who is co-director of Mount Sinai's in-vitro fertilization program.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
Rebecca Katz was 29 when she first felt the searing pain in her pelvis that was to change her life. Over the following months, as the pain increased, sometimes causing her to double over, she was examined by specialist after specialist: four gynecologists and two urologists.Exploratory procedures revealed nothing. All the usual tests came back negative. One urologist told her she was "bladder obsessed."Yet every day, the pain seemed to grow."I was going from doctor to doctor who was either dismissing me immediately or who was getting frustrated and then dismissing me," says the Baltimore marketing consultant, who is now 31. "They would say, 'We can't find anything wrong with you.' . . . I thought, 'Am I going crazy?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1996
Three years ago, neither Monica Seles nor Mary Joe Fernandez was sure she'd find her way back to professional tennis.Seles' ordeal was a public one: She was stabbed in the back during a changeover at a tournament in Hamburg, Germany, in April 1993.Fernandez's struggle was a private one: In August 1993, she underwent surgery to find out what had been causing searing abdominal pain for six years.Fernandez remembers her last thought on the way to the operating room as, "This could be it. I may never play tennis again."
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