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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | April 27, 1993
Most women know about cervical cancer because the media and doctors have emphasized the need for regular screening for that disease. However, they know much less about the other common cancer of the uterus, endometrial cancer. This cancer is very different from cervical cancer, as has been pointed out by Dr. Elizabeth Elliott and others at Johns Hopkins who have studied women with endometrial cancer.Who is at risk for endometrial cancer?Endometrial cancer usually occurs in middle- or upper-class women in their post-menopausal years.
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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to screen for hard-to-detect endometrial and ovarian cancers in women using a routine Pap smear, a discovery they hope eventually could reduce the number of deaths caused by the deadly malignancies. The researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center hope the Pap smear, a procedure in which cells are scraped from the cervix and examined under a microscope, can catch the two cancers in early stages and allow for earlier treatment. The Pap test has dramatically improved detection of cervical cancer over the years, curbing deaths by 75 percent among those who are screened.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 31, 1995
Q: My doctor has just told me that I have a large tumor of the uterus and should have a hysterectomy. It is hard for me to understand how a large tumor could develop in my uterus when I have annual examinations and Pap tests. What is the danger of uterine tumors?A: There are three major types of uterine tumors.Most common are tumors of the muscle wall of the uterus, referred to as myomas or "fibroids." These tumors occur in premenopausal women in whom they are malignant only in very rare instances.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Dr. Raymond L. Markley Jr., a retired Baltimore gynecologist whose specialty was female urology, died March 4 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former longtime Towson resident who was residing at Oak Crest Village, was 89. The son of a Lutheran minister and a homemaker, Raymond Law Markley Jr., was born in Chambersburg, Pa. When he was a teenager, he moved with his family to Lynchburg, Va., when his father was assigned to a church in the city. They later moved in 1936 to Greencastle, Pa., where he graduated in 1939 from Greencastle High School.
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | February 28, 1995
Since the 1970s, the drug tamoxifen has been used for treating the recurrence of breast cancer in women. Now, ongoing research is trying to determine whether tamoxifen is effective in preventing breast cancer in women with no personal history of the disease.For a better understanding of the drug, I consulted Dr. Kathy Helzlsouer, an epidemiologist and medical oncologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore.Q: Has tamoxifen proved to be an effective treatment?A: Tamoxifen has been used to treat breast cancer for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By Carol Ann Rinzler | September 20, 1993
HOW do medical researchers go about testing promising therapies?Generally, they call for volunteers. They give the volunteers a form that lays out the possible advantages and disadvantages of the new treatment. Anyone who agrees to participate signs on the dotted line to signify his or her "informed consent."It's not an empty phrase. Informed consent says that the people participating in the trial are there because they freely choose to be. It says the trial is ethical. So if a consent form misrepresents the risks involved, it calls the entire process into question.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Hospitals across the nation are recruiting women for a large study to determine whether a drug used to prevent osteoporosis is a safer alternative to tamoxifen in preventing breast cancer.The study, involving numerous hospitals in metropolitan Baltimore, should answer the question of whether the drug, raloxifene, prevents breast cancer without increasing the risk of uterine cancer and other ills.About a year ago, doctors concluding a major national trial reported that tamoxifen, long used to treat existing breast cancers, reduced by half the incidence of new cancers in women considered at high risk for the disease.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1998
Enthused by evidence that the drug tamoxifen prevents breast cancer in some women, physicians nonetheless cautioned yesterday that women must weigh the potential side effects before deciding to take the medication.Doctors agreed that the news could hardly have been better in light of past failures to stem disease rates: A study, reported yesterday, showed that the drug cut the rate of breast cancer by almost half for women at high risk. Tamoxifen is the first drug ever shown to prevent the disease, which kills some 44,000 women in the United States each year.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Dr. Albert R. Milan, a noted Baltimore obstetrician-gynecologist, died of complications of a stroke Monday at Manor Care Ruxton. The Hillendale resident was 78.He practiced in Baltimore for 46 years and retired in 1996.Dr. Milan was a proponent of breast self-examination to detect cancer as early as possible. His 1980 book, "Breast Self-Examination," was a lavishly illustrated guidebook with techniques that were easy to learn and practice."The cruel realities of life," he wrote, "teach us that breast cancer is among the greatest killers of women.
NEWS
By Barbra Williams Cosentino and Barbra Williams Cosentino,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1999
You're savoring a spicy Mexican enchilada when rivulets of sweat start pouring down your face. You walk into the next room to get something and forget what you're looking for. One moment you're happy as could be and then, for no perceptible reason, you're angry or irritable or bursting into tears.No, you're not having a nervous breakdown. You're experiencing symptoms of menopause, also referred to as the climacteric or the "change of life," and, for better or for worse, lots of baby- boomer women are going through the same thing.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Cheryl Corbin's mother and grandmother had breast cancer, so an oncologist suggested she be tested for an inherited gene mutation linked to the disease. But when the results came in, she didn't show up to hear them. "I was afraid to hear the words," Corbin, 47, said. "There's no turning back from there. " A genetic counselor tracked her down at the University of Maryland Women's Health clinic, where she is an office manager, and told her that she had the mutation that gave her an 85 percent chance of developing breast cancer . Corbin had no doubt about her next move - she had her breasts removed.
NEWS
By Barbra Williams Cosentino and Barbra Williams Cosentino,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1999
You're savoring a spicy Mexican enchilada when rivulets of sweat start pouring down your face. You walk into the next room to get something and forget what you're looking for. One moment you're happy as could be and then, for no perceptible reason, you're angry or irritable or bursting into tears.No, you're not having a nervous breakdown. You're experiencing symptoms of menopause, also referred to as the climacteric or the "change of life," and, for better or for worse, lots of baby- boomer women are going through the same thing.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Hospitals across the nation are recruiting women for a large study to determine whether a drug used to prevent osteoporosis is a safer alternative to tamoxifen in preventing breast cancer.The study, involving numerous hospitals in metropolitan Baltimore, should answer the question of whether the drug, raloxifene, prevents breast cancer without increasing the risk of uterine cancer and other ills.About a year ago, doctors concluding a major national trial reported that tamoxifen, long used to treat existing breast cancers, reduced by half the incidence of new cancers in women considered at high risk for the disease.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Dr. Albert R. Milan, a noted Baltimore obstetrician-gynecologist, died of complications of a stroke Monday at Manor Care Ruxton. The Hillendale resident was 78.He practiced in Baltimore for 46 years and retired in 1996.Dr. Milan was a proponent of breast self-examination to detect cancer as early as possible. His 1980 book, "Breast Self-Examination," was a lavishly illustrated guidebook with techniques that were easy to learn and practice."The cruel realities of life," he wrote, "teach us that breast cancer is among the greatest killers of women.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1998
Enthused by evidence that the drug tamoxifen prevents breast cancer in some women, physicians nonetheless cautioned yesterday that women must weigh the potential side effects before deciding to take the medication.Doctors agreed that the news could hardly have been better in light of past failures to stem disease rates: A study, reported yesterday, showed that the drug cut the rate of breast cancer by almost half for women at high risk. Tamoxifen is the first drug ever shown to prevent the disease, which kills some 44,000 women in the United States each year.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | February 28, 1995
Since the 1970s, the drug tamoxifen has been used for treating the recurrence of breast cancer in women. Now, ongoing research is trying to determine whether tamoxifen is effective in preventing breast cancer in women with no personal history of the disease.For a better understanding of the drug, I consulted Dr. Kathy Helzlsouer, an epidemiologist and medical oncologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore.Q: Has tamoxifen proved to be an effective treatment?A: Tamoxifen has been used to treat breast cancer for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Dr. Raymond L. Markley Jr., a retired Baltimore gynecologist whose specialty was female urology, died March 4 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former longtime Towson resident who was residing at Oak Crest Village, was 89. The son of a Lutheran minister and a homemaker, Raymond Law Markley Jr., was born in Chambersburg, Pa. When he was a teenager, he moved with his family to Lynchburg, Va., when his father was assigned to a church in the city. They later moved in 1936 to Greencastle, Pa., where he graduated in 1939 from Greencastle High School.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Cheryl Corbin's mother and grandmother had breast cancer, so an oncologist suggested she be tested for an inherited gene mutation linked to the disease. But when the results came in, she didn't show up to hear them. "I was afraid to hear the words," Corbin, 47, said. "There's no turning back from there. " A genetic counselor tracked her down at the University of Maryland Women's Health clinic, where she is an office manager, and told her that she had the mutation that gave her an 85 percent chance of developing breast cancer . Corbin had no doubt about her next move - she had her breasts removed.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 31, 1995
Q: My doctor has just told me that I have a large tumor of the uterus and should have a hysterectomy. It is hard for me to understand how a large tumor could develop in my uterus when I have annual examinations and Pap tests. What is the danger of uterine tumors?A: There are three major types of uterine tumors.Most common are tumors of the muscle wall of the uterus, referred to as myomas or "fibroids." These tumors occur in premenopausal women in whom they are malignant only in very rare instances.
NEWS
By Carol Ann Rinzler | September 20, 1993
HOW do medical researchers go about testing promising therapies?Generally, they call for volunteers. They give the volunteers a form that lays out the possible advantages and disadvantages of the new treatment. Anyone who agrees to participate signs on the dotted line to signify his or her "informed consent."It's not an empty phrase. Informed consent says that the people participating in the trial are there because they freely choose to be. It says the trial is ethical. So if a consent form misrepresents the risks involved, it calls the entire process into question.
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