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By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 21, 1992
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The space shuttle Endeavour and its orbiting zoo returned home to a safe, smooth landing yesterday at the Kennedy Space Center.Tucked deep inside the shuttle's lab were 440 extraterrestrials -- brand-new baby tadpoles, the first earth animals to be conceived and born in space.The Endeavour streaked across Central Florida at three times the speed of sound, descending through a powder-blue sky.At 8:53 a.m., the main wheels of the glistening, white 100-ton orbiter touched the runway in the 12th space-center landing of the 11-year shuttle program.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 4, 2009
Seven astronauts are stranded in orbit after their shuttle is damaged during launch. Unable to repair the ship, they hunker down with dwindling supplies while four more astronauts board a second spacecraft and blast off on a daring rescue mission. NASA executives would like to keep this scenario in the realm of science fiction. But they're preparing for it just the same on the slim chance the shuttle Atlantis is crippled during the May 11 repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. A second shuttle - Endeavour - is poised for liftoff from Cape Canaveral if there's a call for help from Atlantis.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
Catching up to a 43-foot space telescope that is zipping around the planet at 17,000 miles an hour takes more than just putting the shuttle's pedal to the metal, NASA officials say.By the time the Endeavour's crew finally attempts to capture the Hubble Space Telescope -- sometime before dawn Eastern time tomorrow -- the astronauts will have solved a complex problem in orbital mechanics and completed a critical act in the 11-day repair drama.If the crew misses the rendezvous on the first try, the shuttle will have little fuel for a second attempt.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
Space cadets! Did you miss the International Space Station on Thursday? Shoo the clouds and watch the ISS and docked shuttle Endeavour as they cross the sky tonight, 221 miles over Baltimore. The pair will rise at 5:29 p.m., in the southwest, just to the right of bright Venus and Jupiter. They'll be high overhead by 5:32, passing very close to the bright star Vega, before moving off toward the northeast.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1992
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The space shuttle Endeavour glided to Earth yesterday afternoon, ending a nine-day inaugural voyage that featured a daring rescue of a wayward communications satellite."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Astronauts aboard the shuttle Endeavour are keeping a telescopic eye on a galaxy 54 million light-years from Earth that appears five times brighter than it did the last time NASA's Astro observatory looked at it, in 1990.Called NGC 4151, the Seyfert-type galaxy has varied in brightness on a scale of days, said Baltimore's Arthur Davidsen, principal investigator on the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), one of three telescopes orbiting on Endeavour with the Astro 2 mission.HUT is being aimed at the galaxy's powerful core every two days in an effort to measure the day-to-day variability.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 2007
Confronted with the same kind of problem that doomed the space shuttle Columbia, NASA officials, chastened by years of criticism and upheaval in the agency, took a markedly different approach during the current mission of Endeavour, calling on an array of new tools and procedures in order to analyze and respond to the problem. While Columbia faced much more serious damage - a 6- to 10-inch-wide hole punched in a leading edge of one of its wings that let in searing gases during re-entry - outside officials said that NASA had taken steps far more elaborate and methodical with Endeavour than those performed during the Columbia flight.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 7, 1992
MIAMI -- Imagine: floating helplessly in space, out of reach of your spacecraft. Alone in the vast darkness.America's space program has lacked a proven self-rescue plan for spacewalking astronauts, NASA officials say.But the crew of Endeavour plans to change that as it prepares for an ambitious weeklong voyage set to begin tonight at 7:06.Forecasts of bad weather at the launch site and at emergency landing strips gave NASA only a 30 percent chance of an on-time launch, however. Shuttle weather officer Ed Priselac said yesterday that rain, thunderstorms, low clouds, haze and even hail were possible at the Kennedy Space Center and at touchdown sites in California, New Mexico and Africa.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
The U.S. opened a new chapter in its space program yesterday with the ceremonial rollout of Endeavour, the space shuttle built to replace the ill-fated Challenger. NASA officials say that Endeavour will be the best shuttle yet, able to stay in orbit longer and land more safely on returning than any of its three sister ships, Atlantis, Columbia and Discovery.In the aftermath of the Challenger tragedy five years ago, many aerospace experts believed the nation's commitment to space required a massive effort to replace the destroyed shuttle, even at a cost of some $2 billion.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
Space cadets! Did you miss the International Space Station on Thursday? Shoo the clouds and watch the ISS and docked shuttle Endeavour as they cross the sky tonight, 221 miles over Baltimore. The pair will rise at 5:29 p.m., in the southwest, just to the right of bright Venus and Jupiter. They'll be high overhead by 5:32, passing very close to the bright star Vega, before moving off toward the northeast.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr | August 22, 2007
The space shuttle Endeavour landed safely in Florida yesterday after a 13-day mission marred by damage to the spacecraft's heat shield that led to a lengthy debate about whether to risk returning to Earth without fixing it. The dinged-up spacecraft touched down at Cape Canaveral at 12:32 p.m. after completing a 5.3 million-mile mission to the International Space Station. NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin said the damaged tiles "did very well on re-entry." After examining the gouged thermal tiles on the tarmac at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, shuttle Commander Scott J. Kelly said he was "a little bit underwhelmed by the size of the gouge.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 2007
Confronted with the same kind of problem that doomed the space shuttle Columbia, NASA officials, chastened by years of criticism and upheaval in the agency, took a markedly different approach during the current mission of Endeavour, calling on an array of new tools and procedures in order to analyze and respond to the problem. While Columbia faced much more serious damage - a 6- to 10-inch-wide hole punched in a leading edge of one of its wings that let in searing gases during re-entry - outside officials said that NASA had taken steps far more elaborate and methodical with Endeavour than those performed during the Columbia flight.
NEWS
By Christopher Sherman and Christopher Sherman,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 13, 2007
HOUSTON -- NASA may have to send astronauts on a special spacewalking mission to mend a 3 1/2 -inch gouge on the shuttle Endeavor's belly that appears to penetrate all the way through two heat shield tiles that protect the orbiter. Images gathered by lasers and cameras on an extension to the shuttle's robotic arm confirmed yesterday that the divot went through the 1.12-inch thick tile, exposing some of the heat-resistant material below. That material, as well as the tile itself, is designed to protect the orbiter from burning up during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE and MICHAEL CABBAGE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 26, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Everything appeared normal June 5, 2002, as the shuttle Endeavour thundered into orbit from Kennedy Space Center through hazy afternoon skies. Unknown to the public, however, the Air Force's top two safety officials at Cape Canaveral had tried to stop the countdown. Air Force technicians could not verify that a critical backup system used to destroy errant rockets was working properly. In an apparently unprecedented move, the safety officers were overruled after a phone conversation between Brig.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Corrosion and faulty installation of critical parts inside the space shuttle Discovery's tail are prompting NASA to replace the equipment on all three orbiters, but the program's chief said he believes the space agency will still launch a shuttle next spring. At the same time, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration say they are making major progress on some of the toughest problems exposed by the loss of the shuttle Columbia in February 2003, including how to repair the spacecraft's thermal protection system in orbit.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 12, 2001
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Up close, the space shuttle Columbia's body shows every one of its 20 years and nearly 111 million miles of flying: pockmarked tiles, rust-colored blemishes and other stains that look like liver spots. But inside, Columbia flaunts its renewed youth. Gone are its old-fashioned gauges and dials, replaced by a control panel that uses full-color computer graphics to show what's going on. The shuttle has shed a few hundred pounds. Most of its wiring is new. The engines are the world's most advanced.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a flawless pre-dawn launch that rumbled like thunderous timpani, the Shuttle Endeavour hurtled early today toward its much anticipated rendezvous with the Hubble Space Telescope and the start of an arduous and complex repair mission.The seven-member crew spent much of yesterday firing up Endeavour's engines to reach the 48-foot-long observatory at the appointed hour and orbit. The shuttle is expected to intercept Hubble tomorrow morning when it is more than 360 miles above the earth.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 29, 1998
A U.S. and Russian shuttle crew is prepared to deliver the second large component of the new international space station to Earth orbit this week, showcasing NASA's six-year strategy for assembling the sprawling research outpost with robotics and multiple spacewalks.The shuttle astronauts have trained for more than two years to link the Russian-built Zarya control module launched from Central Asia on Nov. 20 with the Unity docking node that awaits liftoff on the shuttle Endeavour.Endeavour is to blast off at 3: 59 a.m., EST Thursday from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
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