Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEndangered Species
IN THE NEWS

Endangered Species

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 19, 2006
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has identified eight current and historical rare, threatened and endangered species of animals in Howard County. Listed by their scientific and common names, they are: Etheostoma vitreum, or glassy darter, a member of the perch family that is endangered in Maryland, although it is secure in its range globally. Gallinula chloropus, or common moorhen, a duck-like bird that the state considers likely to become extirpated, although it is secure in other parts of its range.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act; astute, visionary legislation that's served as our nation's lifeline for plants, fish, and wildlife on the brink of extinction. The act has since become one of the strongest and most important laws we have for protecting and restoring the native species of our continent. Thanks to Endangered Species Act, Americans can delight in the sight of bald eagle soaring over the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, hear the howls of wolves in Yellowstone National Park and witness the magnificent breeching of a humpback whale off the coast of California.
NEWS
September 8, 1995
The Patuxent Research Refuge -- North Tract, Bald Eagle Drive in Laurel, will offer "Indangerus?" for children ages 4 to 6 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sunday.The program will look at endangered species and why they are nearing extinction.The giant panda will be discussed in particular, and children will make panda masks.Registration is required in advance. Information: 674-3304.POLICE LOG* Laurel: 9500 block of Lynnbuff Court: Someone attempted to steal a 1991 Jaguar and a 1994 Dodge Stealth from the Route 1 Wholesale Auto shop between Aug. 31 and Wednesday.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 1999
FOR THE FIFTH YEAR in a row, Talbott Springs Elementary School pupils have raised money to help the National Zoological Society in its efforts to save threatened animals.Under the direction of Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher Carrye Jones, the pupils sold art and crafts on the theme of endangered animals at an Endangered Species Bazaar at Chatham Mall in March.Sales of items such as tote bags with hand-painted gorillas, emperor penguin hand puppets, Indiana bat bookmarks and an Atlantic green turtle tea set brought in more than $2,000.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The bald eagle is about to soar off the endangered species list.The majestic national bird was emblematic of how America poisoned its environment when it nearly disappeared from the lower 48 states 35 years ago. Now its recovery symbolizes how the nation can solve its ecological problems, experts said.With hoopla befitting a national symbol's recovery, the Clinton administration will announce its proposal to take the bald eagle off the critical list on or near the Fourth of July, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON | November 10, 2005
The federal government is no longer considering listing the Eastern oyster as an endangered species, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said yesterday. A spokeswoman for NOAA said the agency dropped the idea because the petition to list the oyster, which is native to the Chesapeake Bay, was withdrawn by the Maryland-based environmental consultant who proposed it in January. The consultant, Wolf-Dieter N. Busch, a fisheries biologist who retired in 1999 after 35 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said he backed off because the proposal was causing fear of a federal crackdown on oyster harvesting in other parts of the country, such as the Gulf of Mexico.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
President Clinton's proposed budget for fiscal 1998 includes a $1.3 billion budget for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with significant increases in funding for endangered species, wildlife habitat restoration, refuge operations, fisheries and migratory bird management."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Richard Simon and Elizabeth Shogren and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - As President Bush, with much fanfare, signed legislation yesterday aimed at speeding fire-prevention efforts in federal forests, his administration quietly adopted a rule that will expedite timber-thinning projects by removing a safeguard for endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, the Forest Service and other federal agencies are required to seek confirmation from the Fish and Wildlife Service or the National Marine Fisheries Service before taking any action that might adversely affect any endangered plant or animal.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Trapped in a steel cage barely big enough to hold her, the large squirrel was not happy, pawing at the bars and trying them with her teeth. Matt Whitbeck and Cherry Keller of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were glad to see her, though. The furry gray prisoner, released after being weighed and checked, offered yet another sign that the Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, once vanishingly rare, has come back. This supersized, reputedly shy member of the squirrel family now is considered fully recovered, according to federal wildlife officials.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
State lawmakers pass budget The General Assembly gave its final approval Friday to a $36.9 billion state operating budget for next year that whittles down Maryland's long-term revenue shortfall without raising taxes. The House and Senate signed off on a compromise reached by a conference committee. Their approval of the budget bill, which does not require Gov. Martin O'Malley's signature, came with little drama — a stark contrast with last year's passage of a budget in the session's final hours.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
When researcher Erik Patel hiked into the mountainous rain forest of northeast Madagascar in 2001, he was a doctoral student embarking on a quest for basic scientific knowledge about one of the rarest primates in the world: a snow-white lemur called the silky sifaka. More than a decade later, Patel, who was profiled by The Baltimore Sun in 2006, remains dedicated to the acrobatic animals he affectionately calls silkies. Only today much of his work is devoted to preserving the species from an array of powerful forces, such as poaching and destruction of habitat.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Just as it can with human couples, sharing a good meal apparently sparks thoughts of love among whooping cranes. The stately, endangered birds at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel are being primed by their keepers for another season of carefully orchestrated mating with a "special breeder diet. " No chocolate or oysters, though, just subtly enriched pellets of the cranes' usual prepared bird food. "We give them a little more calcium, a little more protein," said Jonathan Male, who supervises the center's whooping crane propagation effort.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | February 21, 2011
Sometimes I forget I am a radical. Maybe because I'm a middle class, home-buying, taxpaying, meat-eating, gun-owning Methodist, proud veteran of the Boy Scouts, public schools and the United States Army — I'm lulled into thinking I'm a mainstream American. Recently, I was set straight by a well-stated letter to the editor from a reader (let's call him Gentle Reader). My first reaction was to dismiss it as a rant. The headline said: "Environmental education will radicalize our youth.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | November 1, 2010
I won't waste time telling you how to vote in the upcoming elections, but I will provide some history and context on politics and the environment. The choices for environmental voters used to be harder — and that was a good thing. I began writing about the Chesapeake Bay almost 40 years ago, and for the first couple of decades I don't recall that the environment was a partisan issue. A short list of leaders who were instrumental then in working to restore the bay will make my point.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 7, 2010
Another Labor Day has passed with the usual celebrations of the hero of the American middle class — "the working stiff. " President Obama attended one in Milwaukee, but he was preaching to a diminished choir in terms of the organized labor movement. According to the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 12.3 percent of the nation's work force today belong to a labor union. And last year only 7.2 percent of private-sector workers were union members, compared to 37.4 percent in the public sector at the local, state and federal levels.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
Several Harford County residents are protesting a proposed gas pipeline that would run beneath their land by refusing to allow environmental surveyors hired by a natural gas company onto their properties. "This pipeline might be coming, but I am not going to help them," said Lisa Schneider of Fallston. As a condition of its approval of the project, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission required AES, the Virginia company planning to run an 88-mile pipeline through Maryland, to conduct an environmental survey to locate endangered species along its path.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.