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End Of Summer

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NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1999
IT'S THE UNOFFICIAL end of summer -- and August won't even have ended -- when school buses begin to roll next week for thousands of county students. And it's not only back to school, but back to the sports, meetings and fund-raisers that have taken a break over the summer months.Jenkins Memorial Church in Riviera Beach will be sponsoring its first fall golf classic Oct. 8 at Longview Golf Course in Baltimore County. The entry fee is $65. All golfers are welcomed.Included are greens fees and cart, doughnuts and coffee from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m., gifts, prizes, snacks, soft drinks, and an end-of-tournament luncheon featuring pit beef, ham, Italian sausage and salads.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | September 1, 2014
Ask some neighbors or colleagues about their Labor Day weekend tomorrow, and prepare to hear how busy it was. Several malls featured back to school sales, kids had a baseball tournament, lots of e-mails to catch up with at work, and the house needed some cleaning. We're too busy, goes the lament, to enjoy free time. Yet social scientists claim that the average work week for full-time employees since 1970 has fluctuated between 39 and 41 hours. This claim does include a range of variations.
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NEWS
August 21, 1997
IT HAS BECOME a ritual at this time of year: Participating in the Maryland State Fair in the days leading up to Labor Day and the unofficial end of summer. Family-style, farm-style entertainment at an affordable price. And nearby, too, in Timonium. Not many other states hold their big state fair in the midst of their prime metropolitan area.What's not to like about a state fair? It has something for just about everyone. Livestock and horse shows; Midway rides, games of chance and junk food; home arts demonstrations; 4-H events; popular bands and other evening entertainment, and live pari-mutuel thoroughbred racing at the adjoining half-mile track (which also offers wagering on simulcast races from Saratoga, Monmouth Park, Delaware Park and other tracks)
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | October 6, 2011
Early in the evening, right in our back yard, about a dozen dragon flies swarmed in a broad circle 10 feet off the ground. The spectacle, one I'd never seen before, reminded me of an air show without the crowds, noise and drama. Curiously, though, our yard is landlocked and nowhere near water. Water, you see, attracts dragonflies to the flying and ground-dwelling insects upon which they prey. So I suppose that the water-soaked soil, due to recent heavy rains, attracted dragonflies to our property.
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | October 14, 1993
SEMANTIC SHIFTSHe smiles and offerswarm hellosAnd is labeled Kind.She masters obscure factsand datesAnd is deemed Brilliant.They have their names citedRelentlessly by the mediaAnd are designated Great.Single, shallow acts haveBecome noble traits,Synonymous with thePersons possessing them.END OF SUMMERVacation's over.Shelve fantasy and replacePoems with memos.
NEWS
August 21, 1993
Here comes Labor Day, the traditional end of summer. Or so it once was, recall old-timers who can remember that far back.Increasingly, Labor Day as a coda, a finish line, a grand finale, a splashdown for summer, doesn't mean what it used to, at least not in Maryland. Last year, 19 of the state's 24 school systems opened on the Monday prior to Labor Day. This year, 20 school systems will do so. Whatever psychological walls used to exist to mark Labor Day as the end of summer and the beginning of a fresh school year are crumbling like a sand castle in the evening tide.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 3, 2005
IN THESE EARLY days of September, more than at any time of the year, I think I feel a change move through my life. I notice it in the change of light in the mornings and evenings, but it also has plenty to do with a life spent in Baltimore with relatives who had their own ways of doing things. I've not been home from my vacation for long, but when I left Baltimore three weeks ago, we were in the midst of a humid and draining summer. When I returned, it was clear something else was in the air. I was reminded of vacation arrivals back many years ago, when the old house on Guilford Avenue had been largely shut down, or at least emptied of most of the family for big chunks of June, July and August.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2003
Labor Day used to be considered the traditional end of summer, one last gasp of the season of family cookouts and cherry snowballs. Not anymore. The vast expanse of lazy days that used to be summer has been nibbled away in so many ways. To some it feels as though summer never got traction this year, with uncooperative weather, earlier school openings, an American trend toward shorter vacations and a quirk in the calendar. "There's an element of shock that summer's already over," said Rowland Savage, coordinator of school counseling for Baltimore County schools.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
What happened to summer? It seems to have disappeared faster than a tub of Thrasher's fries. Luckily, the weather is still summer-appropriate even though the kids are returning to school and yellow leaves are beginning to sprinkle the sidewalk. For now, we're giving fall the strong arm while we reminisce about our vacation by the shore. Over the past few months, we've been taking a dip in the ocean scene and finding the best of the beach. Our Baltimore Sun bloggers have been checking out the coast from Rehoboth Beach, Del., to Ocean City and beyond.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2003
With Labor Day -- and the end of summer -- a mere month away, we thought we'd take a few minutes to weigh in on this year's summer fashions. Why now, you ask? Well, it's officially mid-summer and it's also the time of the season when all the stuff you paid full price for is heading right for the clearance rack to make room for fall attire. So here it goes: Saddle up and head west Don't toss those Tony Lama boots -- Western wear is in ... again. Not only can Lucy Liu be spotted in Charlie's Angles: Full Throttle doing that flashy but classic Western look.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 24, 2011
When I reached for one of this season's final tomatoes, I got a surprise. It had bruised and was emitting white foam. In another time and place, that tomato, as injured as it was, would have gone into the stewing caldron. Bruised, soft, mushy, reject tomatoes found a welcome at our Guilford Avenue home. September was our ketchup-making month. This was a house where my grandmother and her sister made so much from scratch, from their own clothes to their laundry and kitchen soap.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
What happened to summer? It seems to have disappeared faster than a tub of Thrasher's fries. Luckily, the weather is still summer-appropriate even though the kids are returning to school and yellow leaves are beginning to sprinkle the sidewalk. For now, we're giving fall the strong arm while we reminisce about our vacation by the shore. Over the past few months, we've been taking a dip in the ocean scene and finding the best of the beach. Our Baltimore Sun bloggers have been checking out the coast from Rehoboth Beach, Del., to Ocean City and beyond.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
Columbia's much-lamented Last Chance Saloon may get a second chance with new operators who plan to reopen the restaurant by summer's end, boosting revitalization efforts in Oakland Mills Village Center. Meanwhile, residents are pondering new plans for a Walgreens pharmacy nearby on Route 175 at Thunder Hill Road as they await word on whether the much-discussed Meridian Square office building will go forward, replacing a vacant lot at the village center. Word of the restaurant's revival came as a welcome surprise, officials said.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Patrick Corbett -- perched atop a booster on a barber's chair -- sat wide-eyed and solemn for a few placid minutes. Then as the barber clipped, moving nimbly and steadily in a race against a crying jag, the huffing started, almost like a car gunning. By the time small clumps of dirty-blond hair had collected on his shoulders, Patrick was yowling: "Ow, ow, ow, ow!" Lee Corbett swooped in to hold her son on her lap, which quieted him -- but only until the scissors started snipping just north of his nose.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | September 4, 2006
No one ever says winter went by too fast. But summer is a different story. By the time school lets out, and the swimming pools are no longer shiveringly cold, the days are getting shorter. July and August streak through in a sticky blur of sweat and cicadas and suddenly it's September: a time to mourn the picnics not packed, the trips not taken, the fish not hooked. Melanie Johns, 13, a freshman at Catonsville High, planned to go camping with friends but got grounded and had to stay at home.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 3, 2005
IN THESE EARLY days of September, more than at any time of the year, I think I feel a change move through my life. I notice it in the change of light in the mornings and evenings, but it also has plenty to do with a life spent in Baltimore with relatives who had their own ways of doing things. I've not been home from my vacation for long, but when I left Baltimore three weeks ago, we were in the midst of a humid and draining summer. When I returned, it was clear something else was in the air. I was reminded of vacation arrivals back many years ago, when the old house on Guilford Avenue had been largely shut down, or at least emptied of most of the family for big chunks of June, July and August.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 28, 1999
SENSITIVE SOULS mark the approaching end of summer by noting subtle changes in foliage.Not me. As a beleaguered parent, I sense that summer is almost over when I find myself in the shoe section of a sporting-goods store, getting ready for the changing of the cleats. This is a seasonal ritual in which a parent shells out money for yet another pair of cleats -- athletic shoes worn by his sports-playing offspring.This time of year, the cleats being purchased are for football or soccer players.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | September 4, 2006
No one ever says winter went by too fast. But summer is a different story. By the time school lets out, and the swimming pools are no longer shiveringly cold, the days are getting shorter. July and August streak through in a sticky blur of sweat and cicadas and suddenly it's September: a time to mourn the picnics not packed, the trips not taken, the fish not hooked. Melanie Johns, 13, a freshman at Catonsville High, planned to go camping with friends but got grounded and had to stay at home.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2004
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. - This year at the Three County Fair, one commercial apple grower came away with a slew of blue ribbons because his Northern Spies, Macoun and Cortlands had no competition. Grannie's Racing Pigs, a traveling novelty show, drew dozens of spectators while the home-grown livestock contests played to a few farm families and friends. Scores of fairgoers only used the Farm Museum, where artifacts such as a sauerkraut masher, lard press and antique tractor were displayed, as a route to the Ferris wheel and other midway attractions.
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