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NEWS
October 13, 2004
Florence E. Behler, a retired encyclopedia sales manager and church teacher, died of complications from a hemorrhage Oct. 5 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Perry Hall resident was 85. Born Florence E. Kerr in Virginville, Pa., she moved to Perry Hall in 1954. She was a district manager for the World Book Encyclopedia in the 1960s and later ran programs for the elderly for Lutheran Social Services. Services were held Monday at St. Michael Lutheran Church in Perry Hall, where she taught Sunday school for 40 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2014
In a recent sports report you listed the second basemen of each franchise who hit more than 100 home runs ("Ranking the American League East: Who has the best second baseman?," March 13). Yet you stated the St. Louis Cardinals had none. Really? Has no one on your staff ever heard of Rogers Hornsby, who had over 190 for the Cardinals and was the first major league player to reach 100 and 200 in his career? Come on, just open a baseball encyclopedia. Keith P. DiNardo - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 2007
Last year someone edited the Wikipedia entry for the Sea World theme parks to change all mentions of "orcas" to "killer whales," insisting that this was a more accurate name for the species. There was another, unexplained edit: A paragraph about criticism of Sea World's "lack of respect toward its orcas" disappeared. Both changes, it turns out, originated at a computer at Anheuser-Busch, Sea World's owner. Dozens of similar examples of insider editing came to light last week through WikiScanner, a new Web site that traces the source of millions of changes to Wikipedia, the popular online encyclopedia that anyone can edit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The Walters Art Museum is donating more than 19,000 images of artworks from its collection to the organization running Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia that is created and edited by users. The images will be available for Wikipedia articles in any language, and can be downloaded free of charge. A spokeswoman for the museum said Tuesday that the Walters is just one of several libraries, archives and museums participating in the collaborative effort to provide public access to their collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,NEWSDAY | April 2, 2001
You don't have to go far to find documentation on the decline of the printed encyclopedia. All you need is an Internet connection. And therein lies the problem. As the Net's popularity has risen, the public's interest in shelling out thousands of dollars for dozens of leather-bound reference books has dropped. But don't take our word for it: Check out the "Electronic encyclopaedias" entry at Britannica.com: "By the 1980s and '90s," the entry says, "the phenomenal growth of telecommunications networks and personal computer systems presented a new possibility to the publishing industry - the delivery of encyclopaedic databases through a medium other than the printed page ... "As computer technology continues to develop and is used with greater sophistication, there exists the further possibility that the electronic encyclopaedia will become less a version of the print set than a product in its own right, presenting the database in a manner best suited to exploit the advantages of the electronic medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Magid and Larry Magid,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2002
A generation or two ago, encyclopedia salesmen would scour neighborhoods, knocking on doors in search of parents willing to part with several months' pay to help ensure the educational success of their children. Their wares often became a fixture of family rooms, growing old, dusty and woefully out of date. Now you can free up those bookcases for novels or knickknacks and use your personal computer to consult an even more impressive set of up-to-date reference works. There are basically two approaches.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 20, 1999
CHICAGO -- Encyclopaedia Britannica, by legend at the top of the knowledge pyramid but nearly toppled by the information age, radically changed course yesterday by offering its mammoth compendium of knowledge on the Internet -- for free."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | December 20, 1999
When Encyclopedia Britannica announced last month that it was offering its 32-volume set for free on the Internet, up to 15 million people flocked to the Web site, which crashed within hours and was down for days. In a single day, the site attracted more traffic than last month's star-studded Net-Aid concert and last year's Victoria's Secret fashion show combined.Why? Apparently, folks are desperate for credibility on the Internet, and the 231-year-old publisher has a reputation for reliability if not technical prowess.
NEWS
By STEVE JOHNSON and STEVE JOHNSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 25, 2005
"If your mother says she loves you, check it out" stands as one of the most treasured journalistic maxims, a reminder that no assertion, no matter how likely it seems, should be taken at face value. Now, thanks to a volunteer online encyclopedia, we can add another: "If Wikipedia says John Seigenthaler plotted to kill the Kennedys, check it out." Wikipedia, the free digital reference book that has grown enormously in size and stature this year, was dealt a public-relations setback recently when Seigenthaler, a prominent Nashville newspaper editor in the civil rights era, told of a bogus Wikipedia biographical entry on him that seemed to have been crafted by an aspiring Oliver Stone-style screenwriter.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Did you know?--The leaves of evergreen plants, such as camellias, are often coated with a waxy substance to protect against drought. - e. encyclopedia science
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 19, 2012
In 1797, the Shaw of Persia received a set of Encyclopedia Britannica to celebrate his elevation. He read it in its entirety - it was shorter then - and in celebration of this accomplishment, he added "Most Formidable Lord and Master of the Encyclopedia Britannica" to his list of titles. I know this because I read it in Wikipedia. It was included in the entry about the Britannica, which had, of course, just been updated to reflect the fact that it would no longer be available in printed form after 244 years and would complete its migration to the Internet.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | March 17, 2009
YouTube. MySpace. iPod. CareerBuilder. Two words fused together with a capital letter in the middle: The construction seems like it has been standard form all our lives. And yet, as Andrew Lih describes in his book that comes out today, The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia, so-called CamelCase was the way computer programmers designated topics that would be linked together on the Internet. And it became the technical underpinning for Wikipedia, the popular online encyclopedia that launched in 2001, about the time the commercial world adopted the spelling quirk to name companies and products.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 2007
Last year someone edited the Wikipedia entry for the Sea World theme parks to change all mentions of "orcas" to "killer whales," insisting that this was a more accurate name for the species. There was another, unexplained edit: A paragraph about criticism of Sea World's "lack of respect toward its orcas" disappeared. Both changes, it turns out, originated at a computer at Anheuser-Busch, Sea World's owner. Dozens of similar examples of insider editing came to light last week through WikiScanner, a new Web site that traces the source of millions of changes to Wikipedia, the popular online encyclopedia that anyone can edit.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | May 11, 2007
Backed by prestigious organizations with millions of dollars, a group of scientists wants to use the vast reach of the Internet to produce the granddaddy of all biology books. Over the next decade, they plan to create the Encyclopedia of Life, a Web site documenting all 1.8 million known species of organisms on Earth -- at an estimated cost of $100 million.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Did you know?--The leaves of evergreen plants, such as camellias, are often coated with a waxy substance to protect against drought. - e. encyclopedia science
NEWS
By TEAGUE LYONS | March 19, 2006
Feeling insignificant? Here's the remedy: Create an Internet-based encyclopedia entry about yourself. All you need do is log on to www.wikipedia.org and write your life's accomplishments. Once you're finished, it will be available instantly to Internet browsers everywhere. Wikipedia isn't some online sideshow, either. It is used by tens of millions of people every week - more than CNN.com. Wikipedia is an interactive online encyclopedia that anyone can work with; you can create your own entries and edit existing ones.
NEWS
By STEVE JOHNSON and STEVE JOHNSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 25, 2005
"If your mother says she loves you, check it out" stands as one of the most treasured journalistic maxims, a reminder that no assertion, no matter how likely it seems, should be taken at face value. Now, thanks to a volunteer online encyclopedia, we can add another: "If Wikipedia says John Seigenthaler plotted to kill the Kennedys, check it out." Wikipedia, the free digital reference book that has grown enormously in size and stature this year, was dealt a public-relations setback recently when Seigenthaler, a prominent Nashville newspaper editor in the civil rights era, told of a bogus Wikipedia biographical entry on him that seemed to have been crafted by an aspiring Oliver Stone-style screenwriter.
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