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Encryption

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BUSINESS
June 3, 1998
Information Resource Engineering Inc., a Baltimore-based computer security firm, introduced its first encryption chip yesterday.Such chips are used to protect electronic transmissions from being intercepted and read without permission.The security devices have become increasingly important -- and profitable -- as businesses and individuals have begun to rely on public computer networks on the Internet for commercial and personal communication."With a modem, people can see your messages over the Internet," said Jack Hembrough, a vice president at IRE. "This [chip]
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Matthew D. Green made a name for himself as the rare cryptography professor who will explain and critique the U.S. government's most controversial surveillance capabilities in layman's terms and unencumbered by a government security clearance or research contract that keeps others from speaking freely. Green's blog is a popular destination for journalists and other academics, while thousands follow his Twitter feed. Colleagues applaud his clear analysis. In recent weeks, Green thought his contributions to the growing public discourse surrounding the National Security Agency, including the recent revelations that it spent billions of dollars to circumvent standard encryption tools meant to protect private information across the Internet, were something his superiors at the Johns Hopkins University would encourage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2000
Digital signature cryptography is a relatively new concept, but the mechanics are ancient. Like all encryption, it starts with a basic concept: A message or string of information is scrambled into a form that can be deciphered only an authorized reader. An encrypted message is unreadable unless you have a "key," essentially a code book or formula used to translate the garbled message back into readable language. These keys are at the heart of today's digital signature technology. Traditional encryption required that the sender and receiver have the same key. But digital signatures use a relatively new scheme, public key cryptography.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
The Johns Hopkins University ordered a cryptography professor to remove from its servers a blog post critical of the federal government for circumventing the encryption that protects sensitive material on the web - only to reverse course after a review. Matthew Green, an assistant research professor at the Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute, said in Twitter posts Monday that the interim dean of the university's engineering school, Andrew Douglas, asked him to remove the post.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1997
Trusted Information Systems Inc. said yesterday that the U.S. government has agreed to allow the export of stronger encryption software than ever before, as long as the encryption is packaged with the company's technology to recover encrypted files in an emergency.Since 1993, the federal government has refused to allow export of most strong encryption products, fearing terrorists or international criminals might abuse encryption to communicate worldwide without fear of law enforcement.Citing that fear, U.S. officials until recently allowed export only of relatively simple encryption systems using short algorithmic "keys" that critics believed could be deciphered too easily.
NEWS
By Philip Terzian | April 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The NATO summit in Washington this past week offered a bird's-eye view of the U.S. obsession with security. Several blocks surrounding the White House and Treasury Department were declared off-limits to "unauthorized personnel," including the people who work there. Traffic was barred from the standard commuter routes, compounding the capital's habitual gridlock. The White House, which features rooftop sharpshooters, surface-to-air missiles and enough unsmiling constables to guard a mid-sized city, was garrisoned by layers of uniformed guards, fingering jumbo weapons.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
When Johns Hopkins officials announced this week that a courier had lost nine backup computer tapes containing personal data on 135,000 employees and patients, security specialists were critical, even though the information probably was destroyed without being compromised. The reaction came not just because the tapes were lost, but because they weren't encrypted - coded so that they could be read only with a computerized key. "Have we not learned from history yet, that if you're going to give [data]
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 15, 1997
Information Resource Engineering Inc., a maker of comprehensive encryption systems that protect computer networks such as the Internet, said yesterday that its security systems have received approval from the U.S. Commerce Department for export and will be available for sale worldwide.Until now, IRE's encryption systems were available only to select organizations overseas. The company now plans to tap the growing international market.Strong encryption products until now have been considered munitions and regulated by the State Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 1, 1999
In a society where compromise is a pillar of government, it feels almost un-American to acknowledge that some issues defy any middle ground. It feels even worse when there are only two alternatives, and both offer unpleasant consequences.This is the reality of encryption, the scrambling of data to keep it away from prying eyes. Yet at a time when it's essential to hold an honest debate about a difficult decision, encryption policy drifts in a Twilight Zone, where both sides tend to avoid acknowledging some hard truths.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
Integrated Resource Engineering Inc. of White Marsh said that former Treasury secretary and leveraged-buyout pioneer William E. Simon has agreed to become chair of a panel of outside advisers the computer-encryption company hopes can help it bounce back from recent setbacks.The tie with IRE is Simon's first venture into high technology. He gained early fame as a bond trader before serving at the Treasury Department under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford, and reached his highest private-sector profile in the 1980s with leveraged buyouts including Avis car rental and Gibson Greetings.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
The local java joint or airport terminal might seem like the perfect location to log onto Facebook or troll Amazon for a deal. But for anyone who has accepted the convenience of unsecured Internet access, here's another reminder to be cautious about what information you share online. When you use a wireless network — or even many wired ones — your communications are sent to every other computer on the network, said Seth Schoen, senior staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit group that defends civil rights in the digital world.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | August 16, 2007
ATLANTA -- Crawling around his college newspaper office on a fruitless search for his flash drive, Josh Weiss learned a tough lesson in data recovery: When you lose a device smaller than a stick of gum, it's unlikely you're going to find it. Lucky for Weiss, a senior at the University of Georgia, the tiny portable memory drive that fell off his key chain contained just a few files for a forthcoming edition of his newspaper. "An inconvenience," he said of the loss. Flash drives, which slide into a computer's USB port and can hold thousands of documents, songs and pictures, increasingly are becoming a security risk on college campuses.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | July 13, 2007
A federal employee accused of putting millions of veterans and medical providers at risk for identity theft tried to cover up the amount of information lost from a Birmingham, Ala., research facility, according to a report from the Department of Veterans Affairs inspector general. The employee, an information technology specialist who was not identified in the audit, lied to investigators about what was on an external hard drive that disappeared in January, the inspector general's report said.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
SafeNet Inc., the Harford County encryption technology company, said yesterday that its subsidiary was awarded a contract of up to $400 million with the Department of Defense - SafeNet's largest contract to date. Mykotronx Inc., SafeNet's Torrance, Calif.-based subsidiary with offices in Columbia, won a five-year contract for its encryption technology. The contract is for up to $400 million in orders, but does not guarantee the Defense Department will order that much. SafeNet said the new equipment is part of the government's continuing program to update its encryption technology.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
When Johns Hopkins officials announced this week that a courier had lost nine backup computer tapes containing personal data on 135,000 employees and patients, security specialists were critical, even though the information probably was destroyed without being compromised. The reaction came not just because the tapes were lost, but because they weren't encrypted - coded so that they could be read only with a computerized key. "Have we not learned from history yet, that if you're going to give [data]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karl Schoenberger and Karl Schoenberger,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 1, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - A Palo Alto, Calif., entrepreneur has come up with a technological fix for a problem that has dogged human-rights activists in developing countries for years: How do you keep sensitive information from the prying eyes of the authorities who could pose a threat to those offering details of abuse? Jim Fruchterman, chief executive officer of the nonprofit software firm Benetech, thinks the answer is Martus, a messaging and database product he developed that protects data with sophisticated encryption.
NEWS
December 10, 1995
The remarkable series of articles that The Sun started publishing a week ago about the secretive National Security Agency is getting attention far beyond Maryland. Some readers -- particularly among employees of NSA and other intelligence groups -- complain the paper is revealing too much.This argument is likely to be voiced even more strongly after today's installment, which discusses a fabulously successful NSA sting. For years, according to reporters Scott Shane and Tom Bowman, NSA has had a hand in rigging encryption machines sold to overseas customers so that the Fort Meade-based global eavesdropper can more easily break their secret codes.
NEWS
By Knut Royce and Knut Royce,NEWSDAY | June 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - The FBI has launched an investigation into who disclosed to Ahmad Chalabi that the United States had broken an Iranian communications code, information he reportedly passed on to the Iranian intelligence service. Federal law enforcement officials confirmed yesterday that the FBI's counterintelligence division was investigating the leak to Chalabi, head of the Iraqi National Congress and until recently the Pentagon's favorite to rule Iraq. "We're not looking into Chalabi so much as we're looking into who provided him that information," one official said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Bazeley and Michael Bazeley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 8, 2003
These are sobering times for Internet users who value their privacy. The government has expanded its online surveillance authority in the wake of Sept. 11. And Web users are bombarded almost daily with warnings about cyberterrorism, hackers, worms, spyware, identity theft and cookies. Fortunately, there are myriad tools for those who want to reclaim at least some of their privacy. Encrypted e-mail, "anonymous" Web surfing, and software that crushes cookies and eats spyware, can all reduce your online exposure.
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