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By Maria Hiaasen | May 21, 1997
Item: Amy's Black Bean and Vegetable EnchiladasWhat you get: 2 enchiladas (2 servings)Cost: $3.19Time to prepare: 50 minutes conventional oven or 6 minutes microwave ovenReview: I practically wrote this one off before I tried it. Sure, the picture on the box looked mouthwatering, but could organic black beans, vegetables and tortillas in a non-dairy, cholesterol-free sauce taste like anything but cardboard? Yes, and how. Amy's -- a California company specializing in frozen meals for the health conscious -- delivers a rich, yet wholesome, enchilada packed with corn, black beans, olives, chilies, peppers and tofu.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Enchiladas are my favorite Mexican comfort food. And rightly or not, my preference for a Mexican restaurant often depends on how well it handles this relatively straightforward dish. I've been spoiled in this regard by home-style Mexican kitchens that served pulled meats in robust brown sauces and salsas that were little more than diced jalapenos. On a recent visit to Mari Luna on Reisterstown Road in Pikesville, I ordered my old standby on the strong suspicion that I'd be in for a better-than-average rendition.
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NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | October 7, 1991
In Seattle the other day, I picked an item called ''crab enchiladas'' out of the menu and a strange work of art appeared on my plate. A glutinous rice pancake was wrapped thickly around a core of mayonnaise-infused crab meat with chunks of ginger in it.Surrounding this assemblage were halved blue potatoes. Yes, blue.When my eyes rolled almost involuntarily out of my head the waiter smiled an affable, ''Yes, I am Gregory'' smile and explained that these potatoes were indeed blue, naturally blue, and that the establishment, the neighborhood and the city of Seattle were mighty proud of the fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
From the outside, One World Cafe looks like it could be a small coffee joint housed in a one-story addition to a much taller brick building on the cusp of the Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus. In fact, if you walk past the few tables up front and the full service bar, you'll find it has a largish dining room with seating to accommodate, by my rough guesstimate, easily 40 to 50 diners. Its interior is not the only way the cafe offers more than meets the eye. 12:58 We entered very much looking forward to eating in a reliably vegetarian restaurant and specifically not seeking vegetarian renditions of meat-centric recipes — except for a veggie burger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
My introduction to Mexican food was a little place in the Midwest called Piedras Negras. The hole-in-the-wall space, ratty decor, tinny mariachi riffs cranked out of an old juke box and flies buzzing bowls of chunky green jalapeno salsa made the restaurant an exotic treat. Only the sparsest of commercial English was spoken. But no matter, the kitchen did all the talking. Piedras Negras spoiled me and, outside of El Paso, Texas, I've never found its equal and was always careful not to judge lesser Mexican joints by the smoggy yellow light of Piedras Negras.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 17, 1995
Saguaro's Southwestern Grill should be a sure-fire hit (no pun intended) with its spicy Tex-Mex menu, decent prices, location in the heart of Towson and good-looking dining rooms. First, though, the owners have to work out some bugs.What possessed them, for instance, to wrap the filling of the vegetable enchiladas in bright green tortillas? Are they going for the eco-enchilada look? And then there's the odd choice of vegetables inside -- including cauliflower and sugar snap peas. Of course, you could ask who would be crazed enough to order veggie enchiladas in the first place, but that's not really the point.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | January 28, 2009
When I heard that Barack Obama's favorite food is pizza from Italian Fiesta Pizzeria in Hyde Park, Chicago, I got to wondering about what our past 10 presidents liked to eat best. Most of the following foods are debatable, but that doesn't make the information any less interesting. I tried to get at least two sources for each one: 1 George W. Bush: Mexican food 2 William J. Clinton: Chicken enchiladas (allergic to chocolate!) 3 George H. W. Bush: Pork rinds 4 Ronald Reagan: Macaroni and cheese 5 Jimmy Carter: Sirloin steak 6 Gerald Ford: Pot roast and red cabbage 7 Richard Nixon: Cottage cheese and ketchup 8 Lyndon Johnson: He liked Fresca so much he had a fountain dispensing the soda pop installed in the Oval Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2004
Sometimes a little thing shows a restaurant's quality. For me, during a recent dinner at Rivera's, that thing was the crispy, perfectly charred edges of a grilled seafood quesadilla appetizer. Those crackly corners in a quesadilla stuffed with gooey cheese and nuggets of shrimp told me that Rivera's is more than the average bean-and-cheese-slinging Tex-Mex joint. The family-owned restaurant, in a Severna Park shopping strip, is warm and welcoming, with an excellent and extensive menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
From the outside, One World Cafe looks like it could be a small coffee joint housed in a one-story addition to a much taller brick building on the cusp of the Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus. In fact, if you walk past the few tables up front and the full service bar, you'll find it has a largish dining room with seating to accommodate, by my rough guesstimate, easily 40 to 50 diners. Its interior is not the only way the cafe offers more than meets the eye. 12:58 We entered very much looking forward to eating in a reliably vegetarian restaurant and specifically not seeking vegetarian renditions of meat-centric recipes — except for a veggie burger.
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 4, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyAn acquaintance of mine, Mary Moore of Atlanta's Cook's Warehouse, served Asian-style lamb chops to her family recently, and they were a big hit (see recipe)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
My introduction to Mexican food was a little place in the Midwest called Piedras Negras. The hole-in-the-wall space, ratty decor, tinny mariachi riffs cranked out of an old juke box and flies buzzing bowls of chunky green jalapeno salsa made the restaurant an exotic treat. Only the sparsest of commercial English was spoken. But no matter, the kitchen did all the talking. Piedras Negras spoiled me and, outside of El Paso, Texas, I've never found its equal and was always careful not to judge lesser Mexican joints by the smoggy yellow light of Piedras Negras.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | January 28, 2009
When I heard that Barack Obama's favorite food is pizza from Italian Fiesta Pizzeria in Hyde Park, Chicago, I got to wondering about what our past 10 presidents liked to eat best. Most of the following foods are debatable, but that doesn't make the information any less interesting. I tried to get at least two sources for each one: 1 George W. Bush: Mexican food 2 William J. Clinton: Chicken enchiladas (allergic to chocolate!) 3 George H. W. Bush: Pork rinds 4 Ronald Reagan: Macaroni and cheese 5 Jimmy Carter: Sirloin steak 6 Gerald Ford: Pot roast and red cabbage 7 Richard Nixon: Cottage cheese and ketchup 8 Lyndon Johnson: He liked Fresca so much he had a fountain dispensing the soda pop installed in the Oval Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2004
Sometimes a little thing shows a restaurant's quality. For me, during a recent dinner at Rivera's, that thing was the crispy, perfectly charred edges of a grilled seafood quesadilla appetizer. Those crackly corners in a quesadilla stuffed with gooey cheese and nuggets of shrimp told me that Rivera's is more than the average bean-and-cheese-slinging Tex-Mex joint. The family-owned restaurant, in a Severna Park shopping strip, is warm and welcoming, with an excellent and extensive menu.
BUSINESS
By Karen Robinson-Jacobs and Karen Robinson-Jacobs,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2003
Taco Bell Corp., the nation's largest Mexican fast-food chain, started its sales comeback in the fourth quarter of 2001. Last year, sales at Taco Bell restaurants open for at least 12 months rose 7 percent, and so far this year same-store sales are up 1.5 percent. Along the way, Taco Bell, best known for selling tacos and burritos for less than $1, has gone upscale by introducing a $2.99 Chicken Caesar Grilled Stuft Burrito and the Southwest Steak Border Bowl for $3.49. "We're repositioning the brand," said Greg Creed, Taco Bell's chief marketing officer.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
Organizers of a popular annual fund-raiser in Annapolis that raises thousands of dollars for Chesapeake Bay restoration have postponed the event this Saturday because the management of the marina where it was to be held decided just two weeks ago it cannot offer the space. Invitations and reminders had been mailed and more than 400 people had bought tickets to The Big Enchilada, the Mexican-themed party that began in 1980. The mailings went out before managers of Mears Marina in Eastport told organizers April 27 that they would be unable to accommodate the party this year because of renovations to its pool.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,Universal Press Syndicate | April 30, 2000
This week's menus Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's...
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 3, 1999
* Item: Old El Paso Enchilada Sauce* What you get: 10-ounce to 19-ounce cans* Cost: About $1.09 to $2* Preparation time: Varies with recipe* Review: In an effort to bring enchiladas onto our menus more -- especially now that flour and flavored tortillas are so popular -- Old El Paso has retooled its enchilada sauce with great results. The tomato-based sauce with onion, garlic, red pepper and other spices has some heat even in its mildest flavor (It comes in mild, medium and hot). But it wasn't overpowering enough to send me running for the antacid.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 3, 1999
* Item: Old El Paso Enchilada Sauce* What you get: 10-ounce to 19-ounce cans* Cost: About $1.09 to $2* Preparation time: Varies with recipe* Review: In an effort to bring enchiladas onto our menus more -- especially now that flour and flavored tortillas are so popular -- Old El Paso has retooled its enchilada sauce with great results. The tomato-based sauce with onion, garlic, red pepper and other spices has some heat even in its mildest flavor (It comes in mild, medium and hot). But it wasn't overpowering enough to send me running for the antacid.
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