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NEWS
October 16, 1990
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) -- The recent epidemic of mosquito-borne St. Louis encephalitis has claimed its first victim in Florida, the state's first death caused by the virus in 13 years, a state health official said yesterday.Alvena Patton, a 58-year-old Brevard County woman who has been in a coma since Aug. 21, died Saturday, according to Ernie Durfee, a spokesman for the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services.The death rate from St. Louis encephalitis typically is 7 percent.
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HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A case of Eastern equine encephalitis was confirmed in Worcester County, state health officials said Friday. The disease is rare in humans, but officials with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene used the incident to warn residents to take precautions to prevent mosquito-borne diseases. The last confirmed human case in Maryland was in 1989 and the last confirmed case in a horse was in 2009. The horse in Worcester County had not been vaccinated, officials said.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
Maryland hospitals have not seen any illnesses stemming from West Nile virus, which recently sparked an epidemic in New York and was detected in a dead crow found in downtown Baltimore this month, health officials said yesterday.Despite this, state Health Secretary Georges Benjamin said he asked his department to investigate every case of encephalitis that has occurred since July -- a month before the New York outbreak -- to make sure that none was related to West Nile."We're going to look at every case of encephalitis in the state," Benjamin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Lonni Sue Johnson spends every spare moment creating word puzzles superimposed on elaborate grids. The moment she puts one down, she starts on the next. In not quite three years, she has amassed a stack of paper that is 15 feet high. Family member say that's how she pins down time. "In order to grasp the present moment before it vanishes from her memory, Lonni Sue urgently writes and draws," says her sister, Aline Johnson. "As she works on her puzzles, her thoughts — which would otherwise be constantly slipping away — are held on the page, where she can build ideas.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 3, 1996
State agriculture officials are urging Maryland horse owners to have their animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalitis after the death of an unvaccinated horse on Virginia's Eastern Shore.Although primarily a disease of horses and birds, the mosquito-borne illness can be transmitted to humans.The EEE virus was detected recently in mosquitoes trapped in Worcester County and earlier this summer in chickens set out as detectors in southern Delaware."Because of the wet summer, mosquitoes have been particularly prevalent this season on the entire Eastern Shore," said Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Two horses on the Eastern Shore have tested positive for eastern equine encephalitis, the first time in seven years that the often-deadly mosquito-borne disease has been found in animals or humans in Maryland, state officials announced yesterday. The confirmation of equine encephalitis near Pocomoke City in Worcester County sparked serious concern among both agricultural and health officials, who said the infection poses far more danger than West Nile virus. "This has a very high fatality rate in human cases, and it is very fatal in horses," said Dr. Tracy DuVernoy, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's acting state public health veterinarian.
NEWS
October 5, 1999
DEAD BIRDS alerted health officials to a rare African encephalitis virus that recently killed five people and infected about 40 others in the New York area. The West Nile virus is also linked to a Toronto man's death and to birds tested in New Jersey and Connecticut.Federal experts are testing dead birds from Maryland to Florida, fearing the infection might spread through the fall southern migration. No virus has been found in them so far.The disease is thought to be transmitted by mosquitoes who bite infected birds and then bite humans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 26, 1999
NEW YORK -- In a new effort to identify the mosquito-borne disease that has killed three people in New York City, health officials sent dozens of staff members through city streets yesterday to retrieve dead birds for testing.The search for dead birds comes one day after experts discovered that a disease they believed to be St. Louis encephalitis -- which killed dozens of birds at the Bronx Zoo and has infected at least 14 people in New York City and four in Westchester County -- may be the rare West Nile virus, which has not been diagnosed in the Western Hemisphere, government scientists said.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | September 19, 2003
Cases of West Nile disease jumped by more than one-third over the past seven days, and two people have developed encephalitis after receiving transfusions tainted with the virus, federal health officials said yesterday. Infections rose from 2,878 a week ago to 4,137 as of yesterday. The drastic increase of 1,259 cases in a week is in keeping with predictions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that this year's West Nile season would probably break last year's record. With a few weeks remaining in the season, there are 19 fewer cases than the 4,156 recorded for all of last year.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | October 28, 1990
ORLANDO, Fla. -- The thought that a visit to Central Florida could result in a deadly encounter with an encephalitis-carrying mosquito is worrying tourists.Calls have poured into local hotels and the Visitors Center from tourists and meeting planners, all of them wondering if a trip to metropolitan Orlando will be safe. The center is operated by the Orlando/Orange County Convention & Visitors Bureau Inc.It isn't clear how many tourists or meeting groups have canceled or postponed trips to Central Florida because of the encephalitis outbreak.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
Just five years after its arrival, the West Nile virus has completed its east-to-west invasion of the United States and Canada. At the same time, the mosquito-borne virus may be having a diminished impact on Maryland and other states where it has resided for several years. Oregon reported its first infected birds and horses this summer -- the last of the lower 48 states and contiguous Canadian provinces to discover West Nile within their borders. California and Arizona are this year's hot spots.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | September 19, 2003
Cases of West Nile disease jumped by more than one-third over the past seven days, and two people have developed encephalitis after receiving transfusions tainted with the virus, federal health officials said yesterday. Infections rose from 2,878 a week ago to 4,137 as of yesterday. The drastic increase of 1,259 cases in a week is in keeping with predictions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that this year's West Nile season would probably break last year's record. With a few weeks remaining in the season, there are 19 fewer cases than the 4,156 recorded for all of last year.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Two horses on the Eastern Shore have tested positive for eastern equine encephalitis, the first time in seven years that the often-deadly mosquito-borne disease has been found in animals or humans in Maryland, state officials announced yesterday. The confirmation of equine encephalitis near Pocomoke City in Worcester County sparked serious concern among both agricultural and health officials, who said the infection poses far more danger than West Nile virus. "This has a very high fatality rate in human cases, and it is very fatal in horses," said Dr. Tracy DuVernoy, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's acting state public health veterinarian.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2003
Mosquitoes trapped near Cox Creek in northern Anne Arundel County have tested positive for the West Nile virus, the first appearance in the state this year of a disease that killed seven Maryland residents in 2002. State officials battling a rain-enhanced mosquito boom this summer say it's the earliest they have seen West Nile-infected mosquitoes since the viral invasion began in the United States in 1999. The demand from Maryland communities for spray attacks on adult mosquitoes is so high that hard-pressed mosquito control officials have closed 13 counties to new requests.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 17, 2002
A Catonsville woman who had complained recently about being bitten by mosquitoes while watering her garden has died of the mosquito-borne West Nile encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain. Betty Lee Bittel, 68, died Tuesday evening at St. Agnes HealthCare, 10 days after her daughter found her lying unresponsive at home. Her death is the fifth this year among the 19 Marylanders who have tested positive for West Nile infections. The daughter, Lisa Clark, said Bittel was diagnosed in 1999 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and was in remission after her second round of chemotherapy ended in July.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2002
DR. PETER L. Beilenson has just finished his fourth summer of talking about dead crows and mosquitoes and standing water and all the other elements that go into the West Nile virus story. "I've done between 200 and 250 television interviews this year," the Baltimore health commissioner says. "At least a quarter of them were on West Nile." This astounds Beilenson. "The city has had two West Nile deaths in the last four years," he says. "I would much rather be talking about the drug problem and hepatitis C and universal health care.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Two Frederick County horses have been euthanized and a Howard County emu chick died after all three developed symptoms that have since been linked to the West Nile virus. The cases are the first West Nile viral infections in horses reported in Maryland this year. Last year, eight horses tested positive for West Nile, all but two in Baltimore County. One died; the rest recovered. "We're expecting we probably will see more," said Sue duPont, spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 10, 1991
* ''Awakenings'' Robert De Niro is an encephalitis victim who returns to consciousness after 30 years. Robin Williams is the doctor who brings him back.* ''Hidden Agenda'' An American, in Northern Ireland on a fact-finding assignment, is murdered by British intelligence agents. The victim's wife works to expose the killers. Frances McDormand stars.* ''Lionheart'' Jean-Claude Van Damme goes A.W.O.L. from the French Foreign Legion to help his brother in Los Angeles.* ''Not Without My Daughter'' Sally Field is the wife of a man who takes her to Iran for a visit.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Two Frederick County horses have been euthanized and a Howard County emu chick died after all three developed symptoms that have since been linked to the West Nile virus. The cases are the first West Nile viral infections in horses reported in Maryland this year. Last year, eight horses tested positive for West Nile, all but two in Baltimore County. One died; the rest recovered. "We're expecting we probably will see more," said Sue duPont, spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
The city's health commissioner declared Baltimore "the epicenter of the West Nile virus" yesterday and announced a plan to spray pesticides as part of a campaign to kill mosquitoes that could spread the flulike illness. Workers will spray the chemical permethrin - a commonly used crop pesticide that is also rubbed into children's hair to kill head lice - from 9 p.m. to midnight tonight in Clifton Park in Northeast Baltimore, City Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson said. Health officials have found 77 dead birds, mostly crows, infected with the virus since May 15 in the northeastern section of the city.
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