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NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 1999
FROM NOSE TO TOES everything goes when it comes to the emus at Roy Arce's farm in Pleasant Valley."One hundred percent useful these emus are," Arce recently told second-graders he visited at Friendship Valley Elementary School.They mulled that comment while watching two chicks romp on hay piled in the middle of the room.It was cool to see the emu's large, dark egg and know that it is not only edible (boiling it takes an hour and a half), but it could also be turned into an exquisite Faberge egg and sold for $20 to $700.
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SPORTS
November 27, 2006
Inside a drive Here is a five-play, 57-yard touchdown drive by Navy in its 49-21 rout at Eastern Michigan on Nov. 11. The drive began at the Navy 43, with the Midshipmen leading 21-0 late in the second quarter. 1. First-and-10 at Navy 43. Call: Play-action pass, giving slotback Reggie Campbell the option of going deep or turning into the flat. Result: Quarterback Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada completed to Campbell in right flat for 13 yards. Why coach Paul Johnson called it: The free safety and outside linebacker on the play side were crowding the line of scrimmage.
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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | April 28, 1996
WHEN I WAS working in Argentina years ago, one of the striking features of the pampas, or the open plains, was the rhea -- a large flightless bird with long legs that looks like a small ostrich.The rhea ran wild on the grassy savanna, mixing with the cattle and occasionally grazing with the sheep. For occasional sport, or for entertainment of city-slicker guests, the cowboys of the estancia might display their skills in throwing the bola (three stone balls on the ends of a leather cord) to entangle the legs of the fleeing birds and bring them down.
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
A disclosure statement on the "Operation EMU" home page gets right to the conspiracy-theory point: The Web site (operationemu.com) is a collection of odds and ends "related to the alleged 1974 NASA experiment during which an entire Hollywood film crew, contracted by the government, disappeared in a remote section of Nevada." Travis and Mabel Mountjoy vanished, too. The 17-year-old twins from Rockville -- child-prodigy physics students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- assumed leadership of an obscure Maryland research organization founded by their late father.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1995
Diana Beuchert moves about her kitchen gathering implements and utensils, getting ready to prepare what she hopes will be standard family fare in a few more years: A nice fillet of emu.E-who?For those whose antennae are not yet tuned to the next wave, emu (pronounced EE-myoo) are large flightless birds native to Australia. They look like dinosaur rejects and taste like heaven.The taste, and the fact that emu and its cousin the ostrich are low in fat, low in cholesterol and high in protein and iron are encouraging producers, and a so-far narrow market of health-conscious gourmands, to consider these members of the ratite family "the red meat for the '90s."
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
A disclosure statement on the "Operation EMU" home page gets right to the conspiracy-theory point: The Web site (operationemu.com) is a collection of odds and ends "related to the alleged 1974 NASA experiment during which an entire Hollywood film crew, contracted by the government, disappeared in a remote section of Nevada." Travis and Mabel Mountjoy vanished, too. The 17-year-old twins from Rockville -- child-prodigy physics students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- assumed leadership of an obscure Maryland research organization founded by their late father.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2003
Her neighbor, who rushed in with news of an unusual sight, didn't know exactly what kind of a critter was prowling their quiet Carroll County neighborhood. But Carol DeLisle had worked as a youngster at the Baltimore Zoo and the downtown aquarium, and she has read about Australia in hopes of one day traveling there. She knew an emu when she saw one. Early yesterday afternoon, the emu -- about 5 feet tall, with black, white and tan feathers and, DeLisle noted, "long eyelashes" -- was still making itself at home behind a split-level house in Eldersburg.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 15, 1998
DALLAS -- Picture Big Bird. Now picture Big Bird careening toward your oncoming car at 30 miles an hour."It's not so funny when Big Bird is an emu and he's coming at you," said Johnny Waldrip, chief deputy sheriff in Grayson County (Sherman), Texas. "When you've got a wild emu running down a major highway, you've got a problem."He and other law enforcement officials said stray emus spooking horses, chasing cattle into fences, startling rural homeowners and sending cars swerving on backwoods roads have become common occurrences from the Houston suburbs to the Red River and in the rolling ranch country west of Fort Worth.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2001
IT SEEMS that you can never be too old or too young to enjoy an egg hunt. At Owen Brown Senior Center last week, guests at a holiday egg hunt ranged in age from 1 to 100. Sixteen preschoolers, dressed in Easter finery, came armed with little baskets for collecting hidden eggs with about 18 senior citizens. The children and their parents are part of a parent-toddler group called Parents At Home, or PATH. They visit the senior center once a month for activities such as making crafts, sharing stories and holiday parties, said Long Reach resident Gretchen Morton, who serves as the group's secretary.
SPORTS
November 27, 2006
Inside a drive Here is a five-play, 57-yard touchdown drive by Navy in its 49-21 rout at Eastern Michigan on Nov. 11. The drive began at the Navy 43, with the Midshipmen leading 21-0 late in the second quarter. 1. First-and-10 at Navy 43. Call: Play-action pass, giving slotback Reggie Campbell the option of going deep or turning into the flat. Result: Quarterback Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada completed to Campbell in right flat for 13 yards. Why coach Paul Johnson called it: The free safety and outside linebacker on the play side were crowding the line of scrimmage.
TRAVEL
By MARJIE LAMBERT and MARJIE LAMBERT,MIAMI HERALD | April 23, 2006
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA / / I went to the Sydney Fish Market to see what strange creatures I had been eating: barramundi and Balmain bugs. I found them amid an astonishing variety of seafood at one of the world's largest fish markets. Mounded on ice were more than two-dozen types of whole fish, steaks and fillets. There was smoked eel, sea urchin roe and several varieties of oysters, already shucked and displayed on the half-shell. There were tubs of calamari rings and squid tubes. And a lovely rose-colored octopus, its arms twisted to show off rows of perfect tentacles next to a sign that proclaimed "Sashimi quality."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2003
Her neighbor, who rushed in with news of an unusual sight, didn't know exactly what kind of a critter was prowling their quiet Carroll County neighborhood. But Carol DeLisle had worked as a youngster at the Baltimore Zoo and the downtown aquarium, and she has read about Australia in hopes of one day traveling there. She knew an emu when she saw one. Early yesterday afternoon, the emu -- about 5 feet tall, with black, white and tan feathers and, DeLisle noted, "long eyelashes" -- was still making itself at home behind a split-level house in Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
When a Howard County emu chick died of West Nile virus in mid-August, a myth died with it. "We all thought emus didn't get West Nile virus," said Diane Brown, who raised the chick with 22 other birds on her family's farm in Highland. That's the latest emu myth to bite the dust. The bird that many had hoped would provide the red meat of the 1990s -- and that once fetched up to $40,000 per breeding pair -- never fulfilled its promise. Many emu ranchers abandoned the business as prices sank to less than $100 per pair.
NEWS
By Joseph A. Gambardello and Joseph A. Gambardello,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2002
BUENA VISTA TOWNSHIP, N.J. - For William J. Hayes, lawyer and gentleman farmer, it is roundup time at the Golden Pond Ranch. Out among the trees and scrub of Hayes' 80-acre Pinelands spread in Atlantic County, male emus - yes, males - are sitting on nests, and chicks are emerging from their dark-green, eggplant-size eggs after a 50-day incubation. Time was that Hayes and his family would monitor and hatch the eggs in a facility they had equipped with top-of-the-line commercial incubators.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2001
IT SEEMS that you can never be too old or too young to enjoy an egg hunt. At Owen Brown Senior Center last week, guests at a holiday egg hunt ranged in age from 1 to 100. Sixteen preschoolers, dressed in Easter finery, came armed with little baskets for collecting hidden eggs with about 18 senior citizens. The children and their parents are part of a parent-toddler group called Parents At Home, or PATH. They visit the senior center once a month for activities such as making crafts, sharing stories and holiday parties, said Long Reach resident Gretchen Morton, who serves as the group's secretary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
If the American Emu Association has its way this year, the Easter Bunny's got his work cut out for him. A few trips to the gym might help. mnThe emu association has suggested that consumers swap traditional dyed chicken eggs this year for the naturally colored -- and immense -- eggs of the emu. Weighing 20 ounces and standing 4 inches tall, the emu's egg is the Incredible Hulk of the poultry world, both super-strong and, well, deep green. "There are three layers of color [in the shell]
NEWS
January 1, 1995
Emu Speculation Will Never FlyFortunately, the eagerness of emu investors to get the emu onto the slaughterhouse floor flies in the face of reality ("Emu farming begins to take off," The Sun, Dec. 12).As the American Veterinary Medical Association and other analysts have pointed out, the emu business is a pyramid structure consisting almost entirely of speculation in breeding stock.When this pyramid collapses, thousands of investors will lose their fortunes and thousands of emus will be killed to cut losses, since virtually no progress has been made toward actually developing a consumer market for emu, ostrich or any other flesh derived from the ratites, or flightless fowl.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1992
LEANDER, Texas -- Call it the Ratite Rage. Call it big time money, the hottest fad in farmdom.Ratite? As in flightless birds. We're talking ostriches and emus here, the former being the largest and dumbest bird in the world; the latter being the similar but slightly smaller national symbol of Australia and not very high on the brainpower scale, either.But get this: These birds are now being raised in every state in the United States, even in chilly northern climes. They're being -- TTC raised in Canada, for that matter.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 1999
FROM NOSE TO TOES everything goes when it comes to the emus at Roy Arce's farm in Pleasant Valley."One hundred percent useful these emus are," Arce recently told second-graders he visited at Friendship Valley Elementary School.They mulled that comment while watching two chicks romp on hay piled in the middle of the room.It was cool to see the emu's large, dark egg and know that it is not only edible (boiling it takes an hour and a half), but it could also be turned into an exquisite Faberge egg and sold for $20 to $700.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
It's a jungle out there in Harford County.The rolling hills usually reserved for cows and sheep are home to exotic animals such as zebras, llamas and bison -- some as pets, others as part of an evolving agricultural community struggling to hang on amid housing developments and businesses."
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