Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmpty Nest
IN THE NEWS

Empty Nest

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Joanne Sherman | August 29, 1993
It is the time of year when young adults leave home, many for the first time.A byproduct of this annual ritual is a barrage of empty-nest articles published to help mommy and daddy birds handle the departure of their nearly-grown birdlets. Unfortunately, what most empty-nest articles neglect to mention is that when your children depart, they will try to steal everything they can sneak out of the house.Listen to parents who have been through the experience: Even the sweetest, most loving child, the one who lighted up your life from the moment of birth to the moment of departure, needs to be patted down before he or she embarks on the journey.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 20, 2011
Each morning, Monday through Friday, I'll hook you up with reading material to skim through as you slug down coffee and slack off at the start of your workday -- that way I'll have an excuse to do the same at the start of mine.     Running it back: There is no contract yet in hand, but Westminster wants the Ravens back in the nest for training camp . ... On Wednesday, the Orioles interviewed Toronto Blue Jays executive Tony LaCava for their top front office position . ... North Carolina is the favorite to win the Atlantic Coast Conference.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lucy Lee | April 10, 1995
WHEN MY daughters became teen-agers I listened more closely to friends' laments about their empty nests. I took note of magazine articles that suggested ways to cope with this painful JTC stage. But now that I'm finally in it, I wonder what the despair was about.It is an adjustment and, like all new phases, it takes some getting used to. The first few weeks I came home to an empty house the snapshots of the children practically jumped off the desk at me. The quietness and stillness were eerie; the sense of expectation, disorienting.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | March 18, 2007
I DON'T KNOW WHAT I WAS thinking when I had kids. That sounds all wrong. Let me try again. I don't remember what I was thinking when I decided to have kids. I think I had decided that I didn't want to not have kids, but I can't even say that for sure. I might have simply wanted to add a couple of extra props to the diorama of married life I had created, complete with picket fence. But once I had kids, I could no longer remember what life had been like without them, in ways both good and bad. That emotional amnesia also meant that I never regretted having them.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1995
We've got live sports in the morning from England and a taped sports awards show in the evening -- the latter with a Baltimore angle. And say goodbye to "Empty Nest" again, too.* "Wimbledon Tennis" (9 a.m.-1 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The women's singles final is on tap, with Steffi Graf meeting Arantxa Sanchez Vicario on the grass courts of The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in London. Dick Enberg, Chris Evert, John McEnroe, Hannah Storm and Bud Collins provide the coverage. NBC.* "The Secret of Life: Children by Design" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 9, 1994
"The Boys Are Back," the CBS sitcom that premieres at 8 p.m. Sunday on WBAL (Channel 11), should be on the Nostalgia Channel. Or maybe the History Channel, or the Way Back When Channel.It seems to care not a whit for demographics -- the watchword of TV programming in the 1980s and '90s.It is cleverly written, however, and will probably make you laugh during the half hour. It will also likely wind up in Nielsen's Top 10 or 20 next week, thanks to its showcase after "60 Minutes," before settling into its Wednesday night slot.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
Saturday night fixture "Empty Nest" says so long forever (not counting the reruns that we'll see for a good long time), with a satisfying two-part finale. "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" dabbles history, and a Disney hit film of the '70s gets a new treatment.* "Empty Nest" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- After seven seasons, the series ends its run with a double episode that includes the return of Kristy McNichol, who did four seasons as the daughter of Dr. Weston (Richard Mulligan). A double wedding is in the offing, for both Carol (Dinah Manoff)
BUSINESS
By Glenn Burkins and Glenn Burkins,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 1, 1991
One by one, your children have all left home. Suddenly, you have a house that is too big for your needs.It might be a good time to buy a smaller home or move into a rental unit, says Edward J. O'Grady, president of the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants.Either way, you could free up some cash for other needs.Also, if you or your spouse is 55 or over, you may be able to pocket up to $125,000 in profits from the sale without paying a tax on the capital gains.But you don't have to sell your house to make extra money.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | July 17, 1991
When last we left Daisy Duck, she was huddled in a nest under a bushin a backyard in Linthicum, sitting on 10 eggs.The mallard was still there early Thursday evening when Dena LeCompte went out for a look. Daisy was at her post, but LeCompte saw that now she had company. Three little duckling faces poked up from behind her, getting theirfirst fuzzy glimpses of the world.Early the next morning, LeCompte went out for another look. She found the brood had grown overnight from three to 10 ducklings.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Finally, a local boy in the Oval Office. And he even comes when you call him.President Clinton's new dog, a chocolate Labrador retriever, is a Marylander, born and bred by the bay. An Eastern Shore original.No native of the state has ever been commander-in-chief. But if a Marylander can't be president, at least for now he can sit on one -- all thanks to Tony and Hope Harrington, Easton residents who brokered the dog deal for their pals the Clintons.The dog's mission: to cheer his masters now that their only child, Chelsea, has left them for college.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 30, 2004
DIDN'T TAKE LONG for the Orioles' worst relocation fears to be realized. The D.C. Sports & Entertainment Commission drew a bigger crowd for its afternoon news conference yesterday than the O's drew for the first game of their rain-makeup doubleheader against the Toronto Blue Jays. OK, so maybe I'm exaggerating a little ... maybe this has nothing to do with the impending Expos invasion ... but the stands were so empty at Camden Yards in the early innings of Game 1 that I was able to take a hand count of the crowd in about 10 minutes.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 23, 2004
A COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS to the College Class of 2004: This is your big day -- the day when you jam four years' worth of unlaundered underwear into a Hefty bag and leave college, prepared by your professors to go out into the Real World. The first thing you'll notice is that your professors did not go out there with you. They're not stupid; that's why they're professors. They've figured out that college is a carefree place where the most serious real problem is finding a legal parking space.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 8, 2003
THIS TIME, when I heard the Petsmart commercial on the car radio urging people to run out and buy holiday gifts for their pets, I did not go ballistic. In the past, such a spot would have caused my blood pressure to spike and I would have ranted and raved and swerved all over the road like Glen Campbell after a few cocktails. But not anymore. These days I am calm and centered, and ludicrous behavior no longer gets me all worked up. If someone is crazy enough to buy Christmas presents for a dog or cat or some stupid ferret, well, that's something for them and their therapist to discuss.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | April 1, 2003
QUESTION: IF it's Opening Day and there is no one to watch it, is it really Opening Day? Before the 13-minute snowstorm that halted play in the third inning, there were a lot of empty seats at Camden Yards. After the snow passed, about 15,000 to 20,000 fans had left. When the Orioles had finally beaten the Cleveland Indians, 6-5, yesterday in a 3-hour, 45-minute marathon, Camden Yards was three-quarters empty. There were more fans at the reunion of old Dunbar High basketball players last year.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | January 30, 2003
THE IDEA of not having Cliff Floyd, Hideki Matsui, Ivan Rodriguez and/or Jose Cruz in an Orioles uniform this summer is not worth a major bout of midwinter apoplexy. That kind of frustration is currently reserved for the Baltimore County public schools, which seem to cancel classes the minute a snowflake is forecast for Timonium. Yet here we sit in snowy Baltimore. Floyd-less near Fells Point. Pudge-less in Charm City. Cruz-less at Camden Yards. Anyone buying tickets to Orioles FanFest?
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | February 13, 2002
WHEN I was an overwrought housewife and young mother, working part time and feeling a bit like a squirrel in a cage, I looked ahead, sort of, to when the kids would be launched and the days would yawn before me, full of stimulating occupation and discerning entertainment. I did not envision that soon after the kids became adults I would become -- almost, anyway -- old. I did not envision the expensive and time-consuming work that nature would demand of me -- physical maintenance. Instead of taking my children to the pediatrician, I now go to various specialists for checkups and procedures to check body parts that aren't as reliable as when I was young.
NEWS
October 2, 2000
Frank Wills, 52, the Watergate security guard who discovered the 1972 break-in that led to President Richard M. Nixon's resignation, died Wednesday in Augusta, Ga. No cause of death was given, but friends of the family told the Augusta Chronicle that he suffered a brain tumor and had been ill for several months. Mr. Wills' discovery on the midnight shift at the Washington hotel-office complex thrust him briefly into the spotlight. Early on June 17, 1972, Mr. Wills found a piece of gray tape over a door latch leading into the Watergate complex.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
Gather up some old shoes if you intend to watch NBC's "Empty Nest" and "Nurses" tonight. You'll end up throwing them at the screen in despair over a sweeps month ratings ploy so trashy it can be defined in one word: Geraldo.That's Geraldo, as in Rivera, the syndicated talk-show host. He makes guest appearances in both shows tonight (at 9 and 9:30, respectively, on Channel 2), in the latest "seamless" story line linking the two sitcoms set in Miami.In "Empty Nest," we even hear a line that perfectly describes the gimmick.
BUSINESS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
Wanderlust gripped Mimi Roeder Vaughan so tight it pushed her to vacation on nearly every continent and compelled her to move her family three times in 11 years. As the owner of two travel agencies and a travel agent school, Vaughan even earns her living from people on the go. Yet it wasn't until her children began to pack their bags for college that Vaughan put down permanent roots. That's when she built a college student's haven as part of an addition at the back of her brick Colonial in Towson.
NEWS
October 2, 2000
Frank Wills, 52, the Watergate security guard who discovered the 1972 break-in that led to President Richard M. Nixon's resignation, died Wednesday in Augusta, Ga. No cause of death was given, but friends of the family told the Augusta Chronicle that he suffered a brain tumor and had been ill for several months. Mr. Wills' discovery on the midnight shift at the Washington hotel-office complex thrust him briefly into the spotlight. Early on June 17, 1972, Mr. Wills found a piece of gray tape over a door latch leading into the Watergate complex.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.