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By Lauren McEwen | February 5, 2013
Last night, I took another gander at the episode guide for this season of "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills," and realized this isn't the last episode! We've got one more coming up. Plus, I forgot about the reunions, and reality show reunions are like the meat right near the bone - kind of gross, but full of flavor. That comparison works. I promise it does. Anyway, the ladies are still in Vegas, where Brandi is on a mission to help women twerk their way to empowerment. Watching the ladies try to pole dance was probably the most entertaining two minutes in this show's history.
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NEWS
July 13, 2014
Regarding the recent rant by small business woman and political activist Michelle Jefferson ( "Stop griping and get a grip, ladies," July 11), it seems that she missed the most basic and fundamental message of the women's movement in the last century: don't leave your sisters behind. Born in 1949, I too had the privilege of experiencing, participating in and benefiting from the great cultural phenomenon known as "The Women's Movement. " From the beginning we understood that all women - academics and housewives, bright and average, privileged and disadvantaged - deserve equal treatment in our world, and in some cases, assistance from those of us who could help others to achieve this.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | January 12, 2012
Two items have recently burst onto the media scene: a movie called "The Iron Lady" about one of the greatest women in history - former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher - and a growing European recall of breast implants in danger of exploding. I wonder what the former would say about the latter. Did it ever cross Ms. Thatcher's mind that women's lives could be meaningfully enhanced by surgically strapping gel packs to their chests? How did women get from Margaret Thatcher to this?
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | May 9, 2014
The Baltimore County Commission for Women is old but new. Founded by the County Council in 1977, two years ago the commission revised its mission to make the county-sponsored board more vital and relevant to women. The commission's upcoming event on Saturday, May 10, a Women's Empowerment Expo, is an example of this new direction. Workshops on credit strategies and starting your own business, budgeting and résumé writing are not only practical but geared toward a younger audience than previous commission offerings.
NEWS
May 12, 1995
Less than six months after the initial euphoria, the stark reality is setting in. Baltimore's empowerment zone, a coveted designation that is supposed to bring $100 million extra money from the Clinton administration, is not progressing smoothly.First came the news that Edward Hitchcock, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's choice for the $120,000-a-year empowerment czar, is being eased out amid allegations that he could not deal with the fundamental twin demands of openness and community participation.
NEWS
December 22, 1994
An important lesson is contained in Baltimore's successful bid to win an empowerment zone, with $100 million in federal grants and $250 million in potential tax credits for employers creating new jobs. The city triumphed, because an alliance of more than 500 leaders representing the private sector, non-profits and community groups was quickly assembled and worked well together.We urge that this alliance now continue and go beyond what is stated in the empowerment zone application documents.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore is one of 78 cities competing for six coveted federal urban empowerment zones -- and top Clinton administration officials vow that the winners of the multimillion-dollar designations will be chosen on merit, not politics."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
Six weeks after Baltimore was chosen to receive millions of federal dollars to revive decayed neighborhoods, the first signs of activity are emerging.In West Baltimore, a printing company is making plans to add a couple of workers, taking advantage of new federal tax credits. Across town, the Kennedy Krieger Institute is busy raising money to convert a block of vacant East Baltimore rowhouses into residential treatment centers. And the manager of a proposed ecological-industrial park in Fairfield says he is ready to move quickly on the project.
NEWS
July 13, 2014
Regarding the recent rant by small business woman and political activist Michelle Jefferson ( "Stop griping and get a grip, ladies," July 11), it seems that she missed the most basic and fundamental message of the women's movement in the last century: don't leave your sisters behind. Born in 1949, I too had the privilege of experiencing, participating in and benefiting from the great cultural phenomenon known as "The Women's Movement. " From the beginning we understood that all women - academics and housewives, bright and average, privileged and disadvantaged - deserve equal treatment in our world, and in some cases, assistance from those of us who could help others to achieve this.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
William E. Carlson, the top lawyer for Baltimore's multimillion-dollar federal empowerment zone, has been soliciting private legal work from companies in the zone for his politically well-connected law firm, Shapiro and Olander.Mr. Carlson, who stands to be paid at least $118,510 from empowerment zone coffers, mailed about 50 letters to companies eligible for empowerment zone benefits.He asked executives of those firms to consider contacting Shapiro and Olander for help in applying for the "exciting array" of tax credits and other initiatives offered by the federal redevelopment effort.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Two decades before Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg wrote the best-seller "Lean In," urging women to empower themselves at work, a handful of female leaders in Baltimore joined forces to do the same thing. Network 2000, a statewide nonprofit, was launched in 1993 with a mission to promote the advancement of women in executive and leadership positions, and provide them guidance to help them succeed. Over the years, the organization's ranks have grown to 84 members — mostly women — who are, among other things, CEOs, bank presidents, judges, heads of nonprofits and entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Gayle Danley called the Wilde Lake Middle School eighth-graders "poets," a label that sounded hip and eclectic and, by the tone of her fiery prose, non-negotiable. After introducing them to the world of "poetry slam" - competitions involving artists who recite their original works - the former national and international slam champion sought a way last week to bring out the teens' inner muses. "Pick up the pencils and write the words: 'You can't do that to me!'" commanded Danley, a Baltimore resident and artist-in-residence who visits middle schools through Baltimore and Washington, teaching students to use poetry to express themselves about the more pressing issues in their lives.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 25, 2013
President Barack Obama gave two commencement addresses in one to graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., last weekend. It would be easy for this conservative to critique the political and social elements of his speech. Instead, I choose to focus on the inspirational part. The president struck the right note at the historically black, all-male college. African-American men in America need more role models and encouragement to counter the reality, reinforced by much of the media, of too much failure, crime, imprisonment, out-of-wedlock births, a disproportionate abortion rate and other social maladies affecting many in the black community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren McEwen | February 5, 2013
Last night, I took another gander at the episode guide for this season of "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills," and realized this isn't the last episode! We've got one more coming up. Plus, I forgot about the reunions, and reality show reunions are like the meat right near the bone - kind of gross, but full of flavor. That comparison works. I promise it does. Anyway, the ladies are still in Vegas, where Brandi is on a mission to help women twerk their way to empowerment. Watching the ladies try to pole dance was probably the most entertaining two minutes in this show's history.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 31, 2013
Last week I wrote about a young community organizer named Dayvon Love. Mr. Love and his fellow activists in Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, a grassroots advocacy organization he cofounded, may be the city's strongest proponents of black empowerment. Baltimore is majority African-American, but the heads of its most influential nonprofit organizations are usually white. Race still plays a role in which voices gain access to media outlets, policymakers and funding. So in LBS' view, if their goal is to help predominantly African-American communities, white nonprofit leaders must redress this power imbalance and do whatever they can to support a social policy agenda that is shaped and led by black people.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 24, 2013
At first glance, Dayvon Love is easy to overlook. At 5 foot 9, he has average height and a slightly larger than average build. As he carefully takes in everything and everyone in a room, he might initially seem painfully shy. So when he finally speaks, his observations can hit you like a punch you had no idea was coming. He says that in his experience as a teacher, most Baltimore City Public Schools students think of your average teacher as "someone who's not cool or smart enough to do anything else.
BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
Life's a bitch!" muttered a medical technologist, as she realized that she had just spilled a tube of patient's blood. When she went for the backup sample, the problem worsened. There was not enough remaining specimen for another test.Of course, the patient's physician was furious when the technologist notified her. "This is the second sample you've ruined from this patient!" the physician shouted. "He lives one hundred miles away and he has already left!""Doctor, I understand," responded the technologist.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2012
Trayvon Martin's mother Sybrina Fulton on Sunday morning emotionally addressed Baltimore's Empowerment Temple, the church of the Rev. Jamal Bryant who has been at her side as national outcry has built over her son's death. "It's so easy for me to cry right now but I can't because I have work to do," she told the congregation. "I was forced into this position, but I believe God is using me. " Martin, 17, was shot to death in February in Sanford, Fla., returning home after a trip to get snacks at a 7-Eleven.
BUSINESS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2012
As Trayvon Martin's mother stood at the altar of Baltimore's Empowerment Temple on Sunday, the Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant asked for anyone whose child had also been the victim of "senseless violence" to come forward. At least a dozen women and men assembled at Sybrina Fulton's feet before she stepped down to grab one of them. She squeezed the woman, patted her back and whispered in her ear. Then Fulton moved down the line, tightly embracing each mother, grandmother and father, each of them too familiar with loss, until she'd touched them all. Congregants erupted into deafening applause and brushed away tears.
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