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By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2002
"What makes sisters want to shout?" asks relationship therapist Audrey B. Chapman in her latest book, Seven Attitude Adjustments for Finding a Loving Man. Chapman, who has been on numerous national television shows as a relationship expert, including Oprah Winfrey Show, 20/20 and Good Morning America, writes in the book that she wants it to reach single African-American women who long to be in relationships but feel "a deep sense of hopelessness, frustration...
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Monique Washington-Jones was growing up near Richmond, Va., in the small town of Charles City, she and her younger sister took karate lessons from their father, who ran a coed martial arts school known across the state. There are family photos of her at age 2 holding nunchucks - a weapon that consists of a pair of hardwood sticks joined by a rope or chain - but her formal training didn't begin until she was 10. “The woman I am today is a direct reflection of my martial arts training,” she says of that family bonding experience.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1997
Money has been cut off to a West Baltimore village center that is part of the multimillion-dollar empowerment zone -- and its director has resigned -- after an audit turned up a $1,974 payroll discrepancy.The turmoil marks the second time in 14 months that financial questions have engulfed the Self Motivated Community People's Village Center, one of six neighborhood centers in Baltimore's $100 million revitalization project.Each village center is supposed to guide local rebuilding under the federally funded undertaking in impoverished stretches of West Baltimore, around the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in East Baltimore and in Fairfield in South Baltimore.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Completely synergize resource sucking relationships via premier niche markets. Professionally cultivate one-to-one customer service with robust ideas. Dynamically innovate resource-leveling customer service for state of the art customer service. Objectively innovate empowered manufactured products whereas parallel platforms. Holisticly predominate extensible testing procedures for reliable supply chains. Dramatically engage top-line web services vis-a-vis cutting-edge deliverables.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
A May 8 editorial about William J. Bennett's gambling said Empower America opposes casinos and slots. The group says it has no official position on gambling.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 16, 1992
Welcome President Yeltsin! (But who's minding the store?)Don't knock the Earth Summit. It raised consciousness, at least about how stinking each other's policies are.Nostalgia for Watergate. What won't they think of next?Don't press Perot for a program. He is too busy running to think it up.Now that George has had a taste of Panama he will have the sense not to go to Iraq.City Hall wants to empower communities. Actually, it wants communities to empower City Hall.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
A city "village center" under scrutiny for financial irregularities will be barred from receiving federal money until an independent accountant verifies that adequate controls are in place, a spokesman for Empower Baltimore Management Corp. said yesterday.The village center's executive director, Leonard Jackson Jr., was found to have "improperly endorsed" a $6,500 check and was ordered to repay his bank, which refunded the money to Empower Baltimore's bank, said Michael Preston, spokesman for the corporation.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 6, 2000
THINGS WERE getting downright Socratic in the offices Empower Baltimore Management Corp. in downtown Baltimore at Market Place. There sat Donald Glover, a public information and marketing assistant at Empower Baltimore, prodding his four teen-age charges to think about the question that had come up. A young man in prison for murder claimed he had acted in self-defense, that he had pulled his weapon only when the other guy pulled a gun. Phillip Perkins...
NEWS
May 8, 2003
CLARIFICATION A May 8 editorial about William J. Bennett's gambling said Empower America opposes casinos and slots. The group says it has no official position on gambling. WILLIAM J. BENNETT gambled very heavily, and it has cost him more than money - providing one more glaring lesson in why Marylanders shouldn't risk legalizing slots. Who knew Mr. Bennett - former U.S. education secretary and drug czar, author of the best-selling Book of Virtues, and $50,000-a-pop sermonizer - was also a whale, the sort of high-roller that Las Vegas and Atlantic City casinos thrive on?
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Associated Black Charities, the state's largest African-American philanthropic organization, said yesterday that it has named Baltimore city school board member Diane Bell McKoy its new chief executive. She replaces Gary Officer, who resigned in July after only 18 months on the job, after being told by the charity's board chairman to either quit or face a termination vote by the board. Bell McKoy most recently was a senior fellow at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which supports community initiatives for disadvantaged children and their families.
NEWS
By Jason Botel | May 19, 2013
As the founder of KIPP Baltimore, which operates two high-performing public charter schools in the city, I am heartened and encouraged by our progress over the past six years under schools CEO Andrés Alonso. As I move to a new role as executive director of MarylandCAN - the Maryland Campaign for Achievement Now - I am hopeful that many of the policies and approaches that have driven this progress will be replicated in other Maryland school systems. But the work in Baltimore is far from over.
EXPLORE
By Pete Pichaske | April 16, 2013
To Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance is much more than a business. It's a mission. Started in their Ellicott City home by Funlayo and her husband, Shola, Shea Radiance sells skin and hair products made from shea butter. Since the company's beginning eight years ago, business has doubled every year, and Shea Radiance products are now sold in hundreds of outlets, including some Target and Whole Foods stores. What makes the Columbia-based business more than a moneymaking venture, however, is that raw shea butter -- like Funlayo and Shola Alabi -- comes from West Africa, extracted from the nut of the African shea tree.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Why do some people get sicker and die sooner than others? The answer involves more than our genes, behaviors and medical care, according to a new study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the advocacy group Equity Inc. It turns out that where we live is often the strongest predictor of our well-being, and that disparities along racial and class lines in health outcomes and access to care mirror the inequities in every other aspect...
NEWS
By Robert Maranto | January 25, 2012
This is National School Choice Week, an occasion that always makes me think back to 1976, when as a writer for my high school paper, I interviewed retiring Baltimore County schools Superintendent Joshua Wheeler. I asked Mr. Wheeler why our schools didn't require proficiency testing for graduation. "I know we're a great school system," I said diplomatically, "but even so, some of our kids graduate without being able to read and write. " Mr. Wheeler was an honest public servant, and I'll never forget his candid response: "Your question shows that you do not understand the purpose of the public education system.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Has Maryland reneged on its promise to desegregate the state's public institutions of higher learning? Has the state, in defiance of the law, continued to operate a dual system of separate and unequal schools based on race? The answer to such questions will decide the outcome of a potentially historic case that opened last week pitting the state's four historically black colleges and universities against the Maryland Higher Education Commission. At issue is whether the state has truly succeeded in overcoming the shameful legacy of its segregated past, or whether it has simply extended the policies and practices of that era into the present under a different guise.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
A state panel charged with making recommendations on medical marijuana presented two divergent plans Friday, failing to find consensus on an issue that will likely be debated during the coming legislative session. The 22-member group, headed by Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, split almost evenly between two proposals. The first, backed by Sharfstein and the group's medical and law enforcement officials, would treat medical marijuana as an investigational drug.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
The executive committee of the board overseeing Baltimore's multimillion-dollar federal revitalization effort yesterday approved its third "village center," this one covering the West Baltimore communities of Sandtown-Winchester, Mondawmin and Penn-North.Last month, the board approved the creation of village centers for the East Baltimore neighborhoods around the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and Washington Village in Southwest.The village centers are conceived of as a key link between residents of the city's $100 million empowerment zone and the quasi-public corporation overseeing the grant.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
NASA invented robot cables to help the joints in various space structures move more smoothly. An Annapolis company used those same cables to make walkers for the disabled and elderly easier to move without lifting them off the ground. Yesterday, NASA consultants from the Massachusetts-based Center for Technology Commercialization Inc. used the Annapolis company and several others to show some of Baltimore's entrepreneurs how they could transfer space technology to their small businesses.
NEWS
By Eric Chapman | September 19, 2011
Two recent stories have highlighted how confidential health and patient data are at risk. First, a report from the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Civil Rights noted that nearly 8 million Americans were affected by almost 31,000 health information breaches in the course of a year. Alarmingly, nearly 70 percent of the investigations into data breach incidents that affected 500 people or more remain open. Second, a medical data breach of 20,000 emergency room patients at Stanford Hospital was discovered by a patient after the information had languished online for nearly a year.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
Liz Bowie is to be acknowledged for her article about Dundalk High School ("Slow turnaround," Aug 28). It was quite extensive and also shows The Sun's commitment to education. While the article was primarily about Dundalk High School, much of the experience is applicable to the national issue. Ms. Bowie stated, "The children came to school with more needs than ever before. " This is a growing trend in American schools. Instead of programs that address our nation's high poverty and incarceration rates, the answer seems to be in the principal's desire to get "teachers who would ... be mentors for students who didn't get all they needed at home.
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