Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmporium
IN THE NEWS

Emporium

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1994
Loriann Pfefferkorn doesn't give roses a chance to blossom and die. She kills the fresh buds immediately.There is a method to her seeming madness. By drying the budding flowers, she preserves them long past the last rose of summer.Bunches of every color of rosebud hang from racks in her shop, the newest business to open in Sykesville."They will keep their color and dry in two weeks," Ms. Pfefferkorn said of her roses. She promised that the sweet smell would linger for months.Meadow Sweet Emporium, aptly named for its owner's favorite herb, is replete with fresh scents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Patricia Schultheis | April 11, 2013
On a stormy April evening seven years ago, an unexpected email inextricably linked me to a cornerstone of Baltimore's past. The message was this: "Can you do Lexington Market?" And it came from Arcadia Publishing, a firm specializing in pictorial local histories. I read it in a last-minute email check before leaving with my husband for the Maryland Historical Society, which was awarding him its prestigious Brewington Prize for his article on Maryland maritime history. Between the rain, the snarled, rush-hour traffic, and the fact that the evening's focus was on my husband, I corked up Arcadia's message until, arriving at the society, I blurted "I've been asked to write a book about Lexington Market!"
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
Gladys Cofiell had often talked about opening a shop to sell the dolls, clothes and other crafts she's been making for 20 years.Her son, David Wheeler, finally decided he'd heard enough talk.So he found a first-floor space at 34 N. Main St. in Union Bridge for his mother."He said, 'Mom, if I get you one [a shop], will you keep it supplied?' " said Mrs. Cofiell, 65, who now spends nearly all her time working at her Westminster home to turn out merchandise for the Union Bridge Emporium.In addition to Mrs. Cofiell's crafts, the shop sells "nearly new" items and the work of about 12 local artisans.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
There's the 15-foot orange tree with its menacing 11/2-inch-long thorns, a bushy affair that sprouted from small seeds like those most of us just spit out. Nearby is a kiwi plant, its aggressive tendrils snaking vertically up a nearby tree. And then there's the ramrod-straight, 100-foot-tall sequoia that appears happily unaware that its natural home is in California. Welcome to the Ellicott City property of Donald Dunn, where the uncommon is commonplace and unusual species thrive in blissful ignorance of the fact that they're spectacular misfits beating long odds.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
Despite complaints of loud, drunken, early-morning street fights and trash on Ellicott City's historic lower Main Street, the Howard County Liquor Board has allowed a restaurant/bar there, Phoenix Emporium, to rise again. In a decision granting a license renewal to Phoenix Emporium licensees Mark Hemmis and Susan Steple, the board members said "the licensees have made efforts to reduce the noise" and control the business. Supporters of the business outnumbered opponents, 41-9, at a hearing April 29, and most of the latter said they did not really want to block the license - just calm things down.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
Loriann Pfefferkorn knows how to put retail space to work.After running a floral business in Sykesville for a year, she is moving across the street and expanding into what used to be a fire station. There, she will operate her shop and manage eight others in the town's first mini-mall, which is set to open Friday.Several vendors are joining Ms. Pfefferkorn in Sykesville Emporium, at 7543 Main St."What could be more Americana than an old fire station?" she asked.The 47-year-old building was more recently A Cup Above coffee distributor, which relocated down the street.
NEWS
September 20, 1997
NINE MONTHS AFTER OPENING, Upton's African-American showpiece emporium -- the Avenue Market -- is half-empty. The complex itself is attractive and clean as a result of a $4 million redesign and rehabilitation. But the festiveness suggested by flags of African nations is lost with so many stalls having never been occupied.The market has generated so little traffic that the rents of its merchants were reduced recently. Despite that action, some say they will go out of business, unless patronage improves.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | May 4, 1991
THE INTERNATIONAL EMPORIUM DELI103 E. Mount Royal Ave. Hours: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Closed Sundays. Call 234-0717.The "International" in International Emporium peeks through in erratic ways among the usual deli fare, the daily specials -- liver and onions on a recent afternoon -- and shelves of convenience )) foods. "Sopa de Espana," or Spanish soup, is a menu regular, as are spicy Caribbean pies and bean pie for dessert.But the deli's touted "international sandwiches" are such in name only.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 5, 1994
Whichever adviser told Bill to avoid televised press conferences was looney. Bill plays the White House press crowd like a fiddle, plucking all the strings.FAO Schwarz, the Fifth Avenue toy emporium, is coming to Towson Town Center for Christmas, further proof that New York is through.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 18, 1998
THE DARK SIDE of getting a black eye is that it doesn't do much for your public image. Unlike a milk mustache, which, thanks to a clever advertising campaign, has become a sign of celebrity, a black eye is still regarded as public proof of bad behavior.Sporting a "shiner" makes you an easy target for wisecracks. "So you got mouthy with the wife and she let you have it?" quipped a lifeguard at my neighborhood swimming pool as I floated past him.I had gone to the pool to soak in the cool waters, to escape the rough-and-tumble world, to heal and hide.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 4, 2009
It costs $722 to fly from St. Paul/Minneapolis to Bismarck, N.D., and you can fly from St. Paul/Minneapolis to Paris for $754. Life is unfair; we all know this. Big prizes go to mediocrities while you struggle on, unappreciated. The righteous suffer while the wicked prosper. Bernie Madoff danced around the Securities & Exchange Commission to the tune of billions, and the Immigration & Naturalization people deport a good Vietnamese woman for a minor error. I grew up with the Kellogg's Variety Pack in a family of eight and so I know about unfairness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
BEOWULF -- Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins and Ray Winstone star in the Norse legend of the warrior who battles Grendel and his mother. NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- A hunter stumbles upon dead bodies, a stash of heroin and more than $2 million in cash. MR. MAGORIUM'S WONDER EMPORIUM -- Dustin Hoffman plays the mysterious proprietor of a magic toy shop. JIMMY CARTER MAN FROM PLAINS -- The story of the former president's book tour to promote Palestine: Peace or Apartheid. LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA -- Lovers wait a half-century to reunite in the adaptation of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's novel of the same name.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As the insurgency in Iraq escalated in the spring of 2004, U.S. officials entrusted an Iraqi businessman with issuing weapons to Iraqi police cadets training to help quell the violence. By all accounts, the businessman, Kassim al-Saffar, a veteran of the Iran-Iraq war, did well at distributing the Pentagon-supplied weapons from the Baghdad Police Academy armory he managed for a military contractor. But, co-workers say, he also turned the armory into his own private arms bazaar with the seeming approval of some U.S. officials and executives, selling AK-47s, Glock pistols and heavy machine guns to anyone with cash in hand - Iraqi militias, South African security guards and even American contractors.
FEATURES
November 9, 2007
Next Friday BEOWULF -- (Paramount) Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins and Ray Winstone star in the Norse legend of the warrior who battles Grendel and his mother. Robert Zemeckis directs. DARFUR NOW -- (Warner Independent) Actor Don Cheadle leads an examination of the genocide in Sudan's western region. JIMMY CARTER MAN FROM PLAINS -- (Sony Classics) Director Jonathan Demme chronicles the former president's travels as Carter promotes his book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid. LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA -- (New Line Cinema)
BUSINESS
July 28, 2007
Contracts Training Services On Demand Inc., based in Myersville, Frederick County, was awarded a General Services Administration schedule contract to provide federal agencies with training programs on a one-stop, no-compete basis. Openings Gay Street Food Emporium opened at 239 N. Gay St. with four franchises, Chix's Chicken, Hot Stuff Grill, Hot Stuff Pizza and Nap's Barbeque. The project involved restoration of three early 1850s units, including one with a cast-iron fa?ade, and was developed in conjunction with the Maryland Historic Trust.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
On a quiet evening, less than a mile from where Howard County's lawmakers were busy approving a ban on smoking at all restaurants and bars, Kevin Basciano and John Scafidi sat in Ellicott City's Phoenix Emporium, puffing cigarettes and sipping bottles of beer. They both smoke but admit they don't like the smell it leaves on their clothing - or the feeling it gives to an establishment. "If I'm dressed nicely, I don't want to go somewhere and smell like smoke," said Scafidi, 30, of Philadelphia, as he took a puff of his cigarette and reached for an ashtray.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | March 9, 2006
Phoenix Emporium Situated on the corner of historic Old Ellicott City's Main Street and Maryland Avenue, the quaint Phoenix Emporium welcomes patrons of all ages for lunch and dinner. Good food and a local favorite feel make for a great midday pitstop or late-night hangout. Where --8049 Main St., Ellicott City Call --410-465-5665 Notable --Serves more than 80 types of beer. Vibe --Bring the family in for a feast of burgers, ribs and fries. Later in the evening, leave the kiddies at home and celebrate another week's end by throwing back a few. What to wear --Casual is key. Dress code: shirt, shoes, pants, period.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2000
After 21 years of business, the Phoenix Emporium is spreading its wings. Vickie Goeller, whose husband, George, opened the Phoenix Emporium in 1979, said renovations are almost finished on a second floor that will house overflow crowds and private parties. The Goellers hope to open the new room in December. The floor, which used to house two apartments, is being converted to a dining room and bar that will seat about 80 people. "We were surprised once we took out all the walls how open and light it is upstairs," said Vickie Goeller, who is bookkeeper for the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | March 9, 2006
Phoenix Emporium Situated on the corner of historic Old Ellicott City's Main Street and Maryland Avenue, the quaint Phoenix Emporium welcomes patrons of all ages for lunch and dinner. Good food and a local favorite feel make for a great midday pitstop or late-night hangout. Where --8049 Main St., Ellicott City Call --410-465-5665 Notable --Serves more than 80 types of beer. Vibe --Bring the family in for a feast of burgers, ribs and fries. Later in the evening, leave the kiddies at home and celebrate another week's end by throwing back a few. What to wear --Casual is key. Dress code: shirt, shoes, pants, period.
NEWS
By Greg Garland, Howard Libit and June Arney and Greg Garland, Howard Libit and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
A scathing audit of the Maryland Stadium Authority could have broader repercussions as the debate over legalizing casino-style gambling shifts to the House of Delegates, some legislators say. The issue: Whether the state agency that built and manages Oriole Park at Camden Yards, M&T Bank Stadium and other major public facilities should be entrusted with building and overseeing huge slot machine emporiums with thousands of the gambling devices. The audit criticized the Stadium Authority for taking shortcuts in competitive bidding, conflicts of interest and other problems -- including the discovery of backdated, apparently fraudulent memos to explain a $15,000 bonus awarded to Stadium Authority Executive Director Richard W. Slosson.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.