Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmployment Law
IN THE NEWS

Employment Law

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
Deborah Eisenberg started her law career as a litigator who loved the "thrill of the battle," standing up for the disadvantaged and less powerful. But when it comes to resolving disputes, sometimes she says it's better to talk it out. Eisenberg, a professor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, specializes in employment law and dispute resolutions. She serves as faculty director of the UM Carey Center for Dispute Resolution and also works as a mediator in civil and employment cases.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
Deborah Eisenberg started her law career as a litigator who loved the "thrill of the battle," standing up for the disadvantaged and less powerful. But when it comes to resolving disputes, sometimes she says it's better to talk it out. Eisenberg, a professor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, specializes in employment law and dispute resolutions. She serves as faculty director of the UM Carey Center for Dispute Resolution and also works as a mediator in civil and employment cases.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 31, 2005
The Supreme Court broadened job protections for the fast-growing ranks of older Americans in the work force yesterday, ruling that employers can be held liable for age bias even if there is no proof of intentional discrimination. With roughly half of all U.S. workers over 40, and covered by the federal law barring age-based discrimination, labor lawyers said the decision could open the door to significantly more claims from employees who felt wronged but lacked explicit evidence of bias.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Due to the government shutdown, progress on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) -- which would ban discrimination in hiring based on gender identity or sexual orientation -- has stalled. But when things get back to normal in Washington, LGBT rights advocates seeking to get the act passed by the end of the year now have numbers on their side. A poll conducted by a former Mitt Romney data guy Alex Lundry and released Monday by Politico shows a firm majority of Americans support a federal law that would protect LGBT employees in their workplaces.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
William J. Rosenthal, a noted expert in labor and employment law who as a naval deck officer during World War II participated in the D-Day invasion, died March 12 of a hemorrhage at Northwest Hospital. He was 92. "He was a physically imposing person, and when he walked into a room, you could not help but appreciate his presence," said Stephen D. Shawe, a partner in the firm of Shawe & Rosenthal LLP. "He instilled incredible confidence in clients who'd say, 'I've got a lawyer who knows what he is doing.'" The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, William Jay Rosenthal was born in Baltimore and spent his early years on Ducatel Street before moving with his family to Egerton Road in Northwest Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Due to the government shutdown, progress on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) -- which would ban discrimination in hiring based on gender identity or sexual orientation -- has stalled. But when things get back to normal in Washington, LGBT rights advocates seeking to get the act passed by the end of the year now have numbers on their side. A poll conducted by a former Mitt Romney data guy Alex Lundry and released Monday by Politico shows a firm majority of Americans support a federal law that would protect LGBT employees in their workplaces.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
When Sara Villalobos told her husband she was scared that he could be hurt in a construction accident, he said she shouldn't worry. He was safe, she recalled him saying. He made his crew use protective gear. He wore his helmet. But when a supporting leg of a concrete pumping truck gave way at a Montgomery County work site one winter day last year, its swinging steel boom broke that helmet into three pieces. For weeks, Jorge Villalobos clung to life in Maryland Shock Trauma Center. When doctors told Sara he was brain dead, she agreed to let him go. Now, Villalobos' widow is trying to do what most victims of workplace accidents cannot.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Moving to the forefront of social media privacy law nationwide, the Maryland General Assembly has passed legislation prohibiting employers in the state from asking current and prospective employees for their user names and passwords to websites such as Facebook and Twitter. If Gov. Martin O'Malley signs the bill — his office said it was one of hundreds of bills it has yet to review — the bill would make Maryland the first state in the nation to set such a restriction into law. Other states are considering similar legislation, including Illinois and California.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2011
Businesses often complain of being overwhelmed by government regulations. But when your practice is not to hire someone because they've been unemployed, well, you deserve regulation. According to the National Employment Law Project, Sen. Blumenthal of Connecticut introduced legislation this week to ban employers from only hiring those that currently have jobs. “A snapshot sampling of recent online job postings disclosed a large number of ads explicitly limited to those who are 'currently employed',” said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project.  “This perverse catch-22 requires a worker to have a job in order to get a job, and it means highly qualified, experienced workers who want and need work can't get past the starting gate in the application process simply because they lost their jobs through no fault of their own. As a business practice, this makes no sense, and as a way to rebuild the economy, it only debilitates workers, particularly the long-term unemployed.” A similar bill has been introduced in the House that prohibits employers with 15 or more workers from discriminating against workers based on their unemployment history.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
Whitney Susan Tews, the daughter of Gay Tews Bridges & Digby Carswell Bridges of Ocean Ridge, Florida & Herbert A. Tews of Santa Barbara, California was married November 8 to John Justin Rosenthal, son of Margaret Parker Rosenthal & William J. Rosenthal of Baltimore, MD. The Reverend Thomas Murphy performed the ceremony at Christ Church, Georgetown in Washington, D.C. The reception was held at the Cosmos Club. Mrs. Rosenthal is a recruitment coordinator at Patton Boggs LLP, Washington, D.C., formerly of Hinsdale, Illinois & Gulf Stream, FL she attended Gulf Stream School & St. Andrew's School in Boca Raton, FL. She graduated from Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
William J. Rosenthal, a noted expert in labor and employment law who as a naval deck officer during World War II participated in the D-Day invasion, died March 12 of a hemorrhage at Northwest Hospital. He was 92. "He was a physically imposing person, and when he walked into a room, you could not help but appreciate his presence," said Stephen D. Shawe, a partner in the firm of Shawe & Rosenthal LLP. "He instilled incredible confidence in clients who'd say, 'I've got a lawyer who knows what he is doing.'" The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, William Jay Rosenthal was born in Baltimore and spent his early years on Ducatel Street before moving with his family to Egerton Road in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 31, 2005
The Supreme Court broadened job protections for the fast-growing ranks of older Americans in the work force yesterday, ruling that employers can be held liable for age bias even if there is no proof of intentional discrimination. With roughly half of all U.S. workers over 40, and covered by the federal law barring age-based discrimination, labor lawyers said the decision could open the door to significantly more claims from employees who felt wronged but lacked explicit evidence of bias.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
When Sara Villalobos told her husband she was scared that he could be hurt in a construction accident, he said she shouldn't worry. He was safe, she recalled him saying. He made his crew use protective gear. He wore his helmet. But when a supporting leg of a concrete pumping truck gave way at a Montgomery County work site one winter day last year, its swinging steel boom broke that helmet into three pieces. For weeks, Jorge Villalobos clung to life in Maryland Shock Trauma Center. When doctors told Sara he was brain dead, she agreed to let him go. Now, Villalobos' widow is trying to do what most victims of workplace accidents cannot.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
At the age of 71, Stanley Mazaroff can look back on a rich life and can divide it into quarters. He was a pioneering Peace Corps volunteer, a successful law partner, an art student and now a published author for the second time. His book, "Henry Walters and Bernard Berenson: Collector and Connoisseur," published last month by the Johns Hopkins University Press, illuminates the often strained relationship between the Gilded Age collector and the art historian, an acknowledged expert on Italian Renaissance paintings.
NEWS
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 1997
"The Excuse Factory: How Employment Law is Paralyzing the American workplace," by Walter K. Olson. The Free Press. 384 pages. $25.Just as life-saving air bags may decapitate small children, any collision of good intentions and massive federal regulation is likely to produce unintended consequences, especially where the regs are enforced by plaintiff 's lawyers grabbing up to 40 percent of the take."The Excuse Factory" is the first serious attempt to survey the sea change of recently enacted employment rules, which now require employers to make reasonable accommodation for disabled workers (including alcoholics, drug abusers and 300-plus varieties of mentally ill)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.