Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmployment Contract
IN THE NEWS

Employment Contract

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
The president of Morgan State University is refusing to provide his employment contract to a member of the General Assembly, suggesting that "discriminatory or retaliatory motives" are behind the request made under the state's public information law. On the same day that President Earl S. Richardson announced plans to retire next year, Del. Galen R. Clagett received a letter from the educator "temporarily denying" the Frederick County Democrat's request...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The Baltimore County school board gave Superintendent Dallas Dance a $5,000 a year pay increase this week, part of several changes to his four-year employment contract. The increase raises his annual salary to $265,000. School officials said the percentage increase was equivalent to the 1.9 percent average increase teachers will get, in addition to a 3 percent bonus. The contract also will be amended so that Dance will not be allowed to take any outside consulting jobs. The board's ethics panel found him in violation of its rules in taking a part-time job with a professional development company last year.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | April 9, 2006
Make no mistake: George A. Roche is a very wealthy man. He and his family own T. Rowe Price Group stock worth $200 million, and there's probably other dough he has accumulated in nearly four decades with the Baltimore mutual fund company. But Roche, who retired as Price chairman and president last month, stands apart from other plutocrats who decorate the business pages. He made his money, as the Smith Barney ads used to say, the old-fashioned way. He earned it by staying with one company, helping like-minded executives build that company into a premier, ethical institution and sharing proportionally in the long-term gains of its sharehold- ers. Highly irregular, of course, but every industry has its rogue elements.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The Baltimore County school board gave Superintendent Dallas Dance a $5,000 a year pay increase this week, part of several changes to his four-year employment contract. The increase raises his annual salary to $265,000. School officials said the percentage increase was equivalent to the 1.9 percent average increase teachers will get, in addition to a 3 percent bonus. The contract also will be amended so that Dance will not be allowed to take any outside consulting jobs. The board's ethics panel found him in violation of its rules in taking a part-time job with a professional development company last year.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
An elderly Rockdale man, sued for back wages by his kidnapper, does not have to pay, a judge ruled yesterday during an unusual trial in which both men represented themselves.The ruling in Baltimore County Circuit Court was not based on the claim that David K. C. Xavier breached his employment contract by kidnapping and robbing Abel A. Caplan, 74, at knifepoint on April 13, 1995. Judge Barbara Kerr Howe ruled that calls Xavier made from Caplan's phone to sex hot lines cost more than the $288 being sought.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
The revelation that former Baltimore County Schools Superintendent Joe Hairston supposedly protected two administrative employees who recently have been transferred to other positions raises several huge red flags ("Hairston gave employment contracts to two top aides before retiring," July 13). These alleged "contracts" ignore the fact that all school personnel, including the superintendent, are employed by the Board of Education, not by an individual. Donald Peccia was appointed assistant superintendent of human resources in 2004; Phyllis Reese was hired as chief of communications in 2009.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Philip J. Purcell's golden parachute has a platinum lining. The board of Morgan Stanley has awarded Purcell, who retired as chairman and chief executive after a bitter struggle for control of the firm, an exit package worth an estimated $113.7 million. The disclosure by the firm late yesterday came two days after it reported that John J. Mack signed a contract worth up to $25 million a year to return to Morgan Stanley as Purcell's successor. Purcell leaves with a long list of parting gifts, including a departure bonus worth $42.7 million based on the company's performance through the second quarter of this year.
BUSINESS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Thomas S. Mulligan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2005
It seems that Richard M. Scrushy would rather fight than quit. Scrushy, who was acquitted on all charges related to the $2.7 billion accounting fraud at HealthSouth Corp., contends he was illegally fired as the company's chief executive and has hired a lawyer to pursue a possible case against its directors. "He had an employment contract with the company, and he would assert that he was illegally fired from his job under the terms of that contract," Scrushy's spokesman, Charles Russell, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
Mid Atlantic Medical Services Inc., a regional managed-care company, agreed to pay its former Chairman and Chief Executive George T. Jochum millions of dollars to leave the company earlier this year.Under the terms of a settlement agreement, MAMSI paid Jochum $730,000 when he left the company Jan. 8, ending a court suit by five directors to force him out, the company said in a regulatory filing. The insurer also agreed to give Jochum $1.35 million in 26 payments by January 2000, with an additional $250,000 a year in supplemental retirement for the next 15 years.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Shippers already have begun diverting cargo from the port of Baltimore because of uncertainty about the ongoing labor contract standoff with the largest dockworkers union. The port is losing shipments despite assurances from labor and management officials that there won't be another strike or a lockout when a 90-day cooling-off period expires Friday. But there was no sign of a deal late Thursday, with labor representatives pushing for negotiations to continue and management saying their final offer is already on the table.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
The revelation that former Baltimore County Schools Superintendent Joe Hairston supposedly protected two administrative employees who recently have been transferred to other positions raises several huge red flags ("Hairston gave employment contracts to two top aides before retiring," July 13). These alleged "contracts" ignore the fact that all school personnel, including the superintendent, are employed by the Board of Education, not by an individual. Donald Peccia was appointed assistant superintendent of human resources in 2004; Phyllis Reese was hired as chief of communications in 2009.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Former Baltimore County school superintendent Joe A. Hairston signed employment contracts before he retired with two top aides that would pay them nearly a half-million dollars in severance if his successor fired them when bringing in his own leadership team. Dallas Dance, the new superintendent, sought to replace those employees when he took over this month and posted job openings for an assistant superintendent of human resources and chief of communications. And instead of letting them go - and paying a total of $459,853 and the cost of their benefits - Dance has reassigned them.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
The president of Morgan State University is refusing to provide his employment contract to a member of the General Assembly, suggesting that "discriminatory or retaliatory motives" are behind the request made under the state's public information law. On the same day that President Earl S. Richardson announced plans to retire next year, Del. Galen R. Clagett received a letter from the educator "temporarily denying" the Frederick County Democrat's request...
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | April 9, 2006
Make no mistake: George A. Roche is a very wealthy man. He and his family own T. Rowe Price Group stock worth $200 million, and there's probably other dough he has accumulated in nearly four decades with the Baltimore mutual fund company. But Roche, who retired as Price chairman and president last month, stands apart from other plutocrats who decorate the business pages. He made his money, as the Smith Barney ads used to say, the old-fashioned way. He earned it by staying with one company, helping like-minded executives build that company into a premier, ethical institution and sharing proportionally in the long-term gains of its sharehold- ers. Highly irregular, of course, but every industry has its rogue elements.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | March 29, 2006
I was a senior business executive with a Fortune 30 company. I ranked among the top 100 salespeople out of 55,000, despite being there for just 20 months. Because things were going so well for me, I turned down four job offers in 2004. Then early this year a new vice president joined the department. He wanted me to move to the company's office in the Midwest. I agreed and had begun planning to relocate with my family. But a month later, when my family and I were in the throes of planning for our big move, he called me in and fired me. His about-face has caused my family and me tremendous emotional turmoil.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | March 29, 2006
I was a senior business executive with a Fortune 30 company. I ranked among the top 100 salespeople out of 55,000, despite being there for just 20 months. Because things were going so well for me, I turned down four job offers in 2004. Then early this year a new vice president joined the department. He wanted me to move to the company's office in the Midwest. I agreed and had begun planning to relocate with my family. But a month later, when my family and I were in the throes of planning for our big move, he called me in and fired me. His about-face has caused my family and me tremendous emotional turmoil.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2004
The director of an embattled Baltimore AIDS agency would receive more than a year's salary in severance pay even if he resigns voluntarily, according to his employment contract - a provision experts in nonprofit employment called unusual. The contract, obtained by The Sun, also shows that Leonardo R. Ortega, executive director of Health Education Resource Organization , receives six weeks of vacation a year. A national survey showed that few organizations of HERO's size give their executives that much vacation time.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2005
NEW YORK - Philip J. Purcell's golden parachute has a platinum lining. The board of Morgan Stanley has awarded Purcell, who retired as chairman and chief executive after a bitter struggle for control of the firm, an exit package worth an estimated $113.7 million. The disclosure by the firm late yesterday came two days after it reported that John J. Mack signed a contract worth up to $25 million a year to return to Morgan Stanley as Purcell's successor. Purcell leaves with a long list of parting gifts, including a departure bonus worth $42.7 million based on the company's performance through the second quarter of this year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.