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NEWS
December 23, 2011
Jeremy Schwarz's op-ed piece contrasting unemployment insurance and welfare makes several points that don't bear up under scrutiny ("Unemployment benefits are not like welfare," Dec. 21). He's correct that people pay insurance to protect themselves in case of an adverse event; however, workers do not pay for unemployment insurance. Unlike Social Security and Medicare and Medicaid, to which both employers and employees contribute, unemployment insurance is paid entirely by the employer.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Even though employers won't be required to offer health insurance under Obamacare for more than a year, many already are fretting about the uncertainties raised by the law. Confusion over how the law will work and an evolving set of rules make it difficult to plan ahead, some employers say. Much of their misgiving centers on health care costs that might not be known for months. "Some concerns stem from the general confusion and unknowns surrounding certain aspects of the law," said Francis X. Kelly III, CEO of Kelly & Associates Insurance Group Inc., a group insurance administrator, broker and consultant.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 18, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center is joining Anne Arundel Medical Center and other health systems, businesses and employers who won't hire people who smoke cigarettes or use other nicotine products. Carroll announced the policy Thursday, and it expands on a policy that bans use of tobacco products on campus. The expanded ban is expected to begin in January. Nicotine causes a wide range of health problems and is the leading cause of preventable death, hospital officials said, and is not part of the healthy lifestyle they are trying to promote.
NEWS
October 29, 2011
Using returning troops to patrol our borders, as a recent letter writer suggested ("Put Iraq veterans to work on the U.S.-Mexico border," Oct. 26), may seem like a good idea, but if they would only be able to patrol part of it, what good would it do? The best way to stop illegal immigrants from crossing the border get a job would be to stop hiring them. If there's no job, there's no reason to come here. Create a bigger penalty for the employers who hire them. John Cramblitt, Parkville
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Janis Smith feels a lot healthier - and more confident - since shedding 65 pounds in six months, and that has helped in her job leading employee training for 1st Mariner Bank. "Being in front of a classroom of people … I don't feel like everyone is looking at me, they're listening to what I'm saying versus what I look like," said Smith, 55, a vice president and director for the Baltimore-based bank. "I just have a lot more energy. I have more stamina. I feel like I have a clearer mind.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | November 29, 2012
This year's Black Friday became the backdrop not only for doorbuster HDTV sales but for protests from retail workers across the country. Workers at Walmart, Target, even Macy's, have decried  unfair wages and conditions. So which retailers are the best employers? Job search engine Indeed.com has come out with a list of the top 15 companies to work for in retail. Indeed based the rankings on reviews posted by current and former employees on Indeed's company pages. Here they are: 1. Apple 2. Disney Store 3. Coach 4. Costco 5. IKEA 6. Dressbarn 7. Halloween City 8. Champs Sports 9. REI 10. Nike 11. Vitamin World 12. Nordstrom 13. Sherwin Williams 14. Finish Line 15. Bath & Body Works  
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 21, 2011
Think twice before sneaking time at work to shop online on Black Friday, Cyber Monday or other times during the holiday. As many as 60 percent of employers say they will be block workers' access to online shopping sites this season, according to a survey of more than 1,400 companies by Robert Half Technology. That's up from 48 percent of companies with 100 or more employees that did so last year. The new survey also found that 23 percent of companies this year “will allow access but monitor for excessive use.” Thirty-four percent monitored shopping last year.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2011
Businesses often complain of being overwhelmed by government regulations. But when your practice is not to hire someone because they've been unemployed, well, you deserve regulation. According to the National Employment Law Project, Sen. Blumenthal of Connecticut introduced legislation this week to ban employers from only hiring those that currently have jobs. “A snapshot sampling of recent online job postings disclosed a large number of ads explicitly limited to those who are 'currently employed',” said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project.  “This perverse catch-22 requires a worker to have a job in order to get a job, and it means highly qualified, experienced workers who want and need work can't get past the starting gate in the application process simply because they lost their jobs through no fault of their own. As a business practice, this makes no sense, and as a way to rebuild the economy, it only debilitates workers, particularly the long-term unemployed.” A similar bill has been introduced in the House that prohibits employers with 15 or more workers from discriminating against workers based on their unemployment history.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
In his letter to The Sun ("Readers respond," March 26), Donald Frost laments giving illegal immigrants the right to pay in-state tuition to state colleges and universities. What he and so many others seem to forget is that these immigrants are being employed by our fellow American citizens, who, by and large are allowed to continue this practice with impunity. Surely, these illegal employers — who ignore checking the status of those they hire — are well known to the authorities, but, with a wink and a nod, get overlooked or given a slap on the wrist.
NEWS
Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The Linwood Boutique is a thrift store with a twist. Like most such stores, the historic Ellicott City shop sells used clothing, furniture, books and other donated items. But it uses the profits to provide employment and job-training skills to an often-neglected population that badly needs them: men and women with autism. The boutique is operated by the Linwood Center, an Ellicott City school for the autistic. Opened six years ago, the boutique is staffed by people with autism, a brain disorder that affects the normal development of social and communication skills.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
NEWS
By Pooja Singal, Adi Rattner and Meghana Desale | July 16, 2014
As physicians in training at Johns Hopkins Hospital, we are deeply concerned about the consequences that Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. will have on our ability to provide comprehensive, quality health care to our patients. Under the Hobby Lobby ruling, coverage for four specific forms of contraception may be denied to women employed by closely held corporations, which represent thousands of American businesses employing millions of American women. The forms of birth control that can now legally be withheld from insurance plans include intrauterine devices (IUDs, both hormonal and non-hormonal)
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
More people in Baltimore than any city in the country search Google for information on getting criminal records expunged, but activists found the the results offering advice on how to wipe clean old arrests pretty unhelpful. So, they decided to launch their own app to walk people through the process in the hopes that simplifying how expungement works could help people with arrest records get jobs. A beta version of the app, Expunge Maryland,  went live this week . Users of the app can either pull their records from the judiciary's case search system, or follow instructions on how to get their complete rap sheet from the state.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a setback to the Obama administration Monday by ruling that the owners of private companies may refuse on religious grounds to offer employees insurance coverage for birth control. In a 5-4 ruling, the court's conservatives found that the requirement for contraceptive coverage tied to Obama's signature health care law ran afoul of a 1993 law expanding religious freedom. The decision, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., could have implications not only for secular companies but also religious organizations that are seeking a more complete exemption from the same requirement, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catonsville-based Catholic charity.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2011
Last week at the Howard County Fair, I spoke with Comptroller Peter Franchot about the upcoming Special Session. We discussed Governor O'Malley's comments that he is open to increasing taxes during the Special Session in October. I was pleased to hear that the comptroller agreed with me that during such difficult economic times, the last thing that the state of Maryland should be doing is raising taxes. With Maryland being 50th in the nation in private sector job creation, we need to take steps to encourage job growth not discourage it. Instead of raising taxes, Maryland needs to enact legislation and implement regulations that will demonstrate to employers that they are welcome in Maryland.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 24, 2013
The Harford County Commission on Disabilities hosted its annual Employment Recognition Luncheon Thursday at the Maryland Golf and Country Clubs in Bel Air, honoring several employers, individuals and organizations. The luncheon's main purpose is to "celebrate the accomplishments and achievements of people with disabilities who overcome obstacles in their pursuit of excellence," according to Committee Co-Chair Niki Biggs. "Their accomplishments are especially significant in this difficult job market.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Brian M. Reiser, a self-employed carpenter and an outdoorsman, was found dead Friday in a vacant Baltimore home. The Halethorpe resident was 47. Baltimore County police said Saturday that Mr. Reiser had been killed June 14 in his home. County police were notified that he was missing and detectives found his body Friday in the stairwell of a vacant Collins Avenue home in Baltimore. Kevin Brooks Pendergraph, 31, of Baltimore; Roy Bernard Munson,18, of Pikesville; and Eric Patrick Henry, 37, who is homeless, have been charged with first-degree murder.
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