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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
The largest state employees union balked yesterday at a proposal from Gov. Martin O'Malley that its members take up to five unpaid leave days as a cost-saving measure to help close a budget shortfall. "We would like to see a plan without furloughs," said Patrick Moran, Maryland director of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which presented the administration a separate proposal. "Otherwise, people who depend on state services are going to come in on a given day and are going to find no one there.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
A union battle over the representation of 55,000 workers at the Social Security Administration ended yesterday, at least temporarily, with the retreat of the challenger.Robert M. Tobias, president of the National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU), said he had suspended his five-year battle with the American Federation of Government Employees, which has represented workers at the Social Security Administration since 1979.The SSA headquarters in Woodlawn, with more than 12,000 employees, had been the site of shouting and occasional shoving matches in the union-vs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Howard Friedman has heard the chatter from his own community to Capitol Hill - sometimes questions, sometimes complaints about the federal workforce, its size and its cost. The Gaithersburg man, an attorney and union leader at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, wants to change the conversation. "We've been criticized far too long, strictly on matters dealing with the size of the workforce and our compensation," he said. "I think people don't really understand the direct connection between what we do and the quality of life in our country for taxpayers and for everybody.
NEWS
By Kate McKenna and Kate McKenna,States News Service | May 15, 1991
Block-grant squeeze hurtsFederal employees nationwide will be hard hit by President Bush's block-grant proposals, according to a new state-by-state analysis of how the budget decreases will cut into local %o government coffers."
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
A year-long struggle between the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel and its employees union will continue when an administrative law judge hears charges that the hotel tried to bust the last union of hotel workers in Baltimore.The National Labor Relations Board filed a complaint last month saying the hotel solicited employees to sign petitions to abolish the union and then failed to recognize it as a bargaining unit."It's a flat-out attempt to bust the union. They have no problem intimidating people, coercing people," said Paul Richards, executive secretary-treasurer of the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 7."
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 17, 1992
Four top staff members of the independent Maryland Classified Employees Association, the largest state employees union in Maryland, yesterday defected to a rival union, saying that independent labor unions face an increasingly difficult future.The four said their move from MCEA to Council 92, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, was based on belief that the national union, with affiliation, offered more resources and capability to represent state workers.Meanwhile, a third union organizing state workers announced that it has secured enough member signatures to achieve the automatic deduction of dues, or check-off, on state payroll checks.
NEWS
By Penny Bender and By Penny Bender,States News Service | December 18, 1991
Abuses of temps chargedLeaders of the three largest federal workers' unions have accused the federal government of hiring thousands of temporary workers to avoid the expense of hiring full-time employees."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 25, 1992
A federal judge yesterday gave the National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) permission to distribute leaflets at the Social Security Administration complex in Woodlawn.The decision in U.S. District Court in Washington clears the way for the NTEU to resume its quest to bring 8,000 employees at the complex -- and 55,000 workers nationwide -- under its aegis."This ruling means we will have access to the sidewalk at Woodlawn, and we will use them," said Susan N. Holliday, a spokeswoman for the Washington-based union.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | September 1, 2006
This month, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services improperly allowed a total of $50 million to be deposited into the bank accounts of hundreds of thousands of participants in the new prescription drug plan. And this week, employees at the Woodlawn-based agency began the difficult task of getting all of that money back. CMS spokesman Jeff Nelligan said that a data processing error among a small team of workers in Woodlawn stopped the Social Security Administration from automatically deducting prescription drug premiums from about 231,000 participants' Social Security checks.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
The City of Annapolis struck agreements with four employee unions on Monday, giving employees raises and changing their health benefits in retirement. Mayor Josh Cohen, who will stand re-election next week, said the four-year agreements are a "real feather in Annapolis' cap" and came after 14 months of negotiations with the unions. City Manager Michael Malinoff said the contracts are "an affordable solution" for the city to shore up its pension and retiree health care programs, which currently are underfunded and have put the city's bond ratings at risk.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
A union representing nearly 1,500 Baltimore County public employees has reached an agreement with the county to extend its contract through 2016. Members of the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees ratified the extension by a vote of 98 percent, the union said Wednesday. The group — which previously had a labor agreement with the county through 2015 — represents workers including correctional officers and emergency dispatchers. Under their contract, the employees are scheduled to get a 3 percent bonus in November 2014 and a 3 percent cost-of-living increase in July 2015.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | May 19, 2013
One of the more enjoyable aspects of my public career was an excellent relationship with public safety unions. Law enforcement, fire and EMT groups were supportive of my races for the state legislature, Congress and governor. Although not unheard of, such consistent support made for some uneasy moments when national labor organizations (almost exclusively associated with Democratic candidates) were informed about public safety union support for "that Republican Ehrlich. " From a personal perspective, it was easy to separate the unique nature of public safety's job description (public protection being the No. 1 job of government)
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Labor unions representing federal employees reacted angrily to the $3.8 trillion budget unveiled Wednesday by President Barack Obama, who proposed trimming $20 billion from federal retirement benefits - reopening a debate many Democrats felt had been resolved last year. The 2014 spending plan - which arrived months late - would reduce annual budget deficits by an additional $1 trillion over a decade, according to the administration's estimates; raise the federal minimum wage to $9; curb Social Security spending; increase the federal cigarette tax and close tax loopholes the Obama administration has pursued for years without success.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Most of the Howard County public library's 184 employees would have the right to unionize and bargain for pay and benefits under a bill that has been endorsed by the county delegation to Annapolis. The legislation follows an unsuccessful attempt in the 2010 legislative session to pass a bill that would apply to all library employees in the state and is one of 17 county bills now before the Maryland General Assembly. Other county measures cover alcohol sales, charity casino nights, the county sheriff's salary and an array of bond bills for construction projects.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
As a Baltimore County taxpayer, I have a few suggestions for County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to include in his ongoing union contract negotiations with public employees: No more using unused sick leave to boost retirement. Sick leave is a benefit when an employee or family member is sick. It is not to be used as a retirement benefit. Don't come to work sick. Double the amount required to be in the pension program and the health program. No more paid holidays in excess of the normal private sector holidays, especially Black Friday.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | August 6, 1992
Activists from two competing unions handed out leaflets, shouted slogans, called each other names and occasionally shoved each other in front of the Social Security Administration headquarters yesterday, as the nation's biggest union-vs.-union battle moved into high gear.Declaring their differing allegiances with white T-shirts or red caps, dozens of members of the two federal-employee unions clustered around one of the buildings in the Woodlawn complex at yesterday's 3 p.m. shift change.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
John Gage, national president of the American Federation of Government Employees, has announced he will retire in August after leading the politically powerful union for the past nine years. The Baltimore resident, who is 66, has battled with Congress and the White House over recent cuts to the federal workforce. A Pittsburgh native, Gage was a minor-league catcher in the Orioles organization in the late 1960s. He worked for the Social Security Administration in the 1970s as a disability claims examiner.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
SECU, Maryland's largest state-chartered credit union, announced Tuesday that it will acquire Anne Arundel County Employees Federal Credit Union. The proposed merger — with SECU as the surviving entity — would expand banking services and access to AACE FCU, which has 14,000 members and $81 million in assets, the financial cooperatives said. The Anne Arundel County employees credit union joins the larger entity, which has over 225,000 members and $2.26 billion in assets. All AACE FCU members were notified last week of the merger, which requires regulatory and member approval.
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