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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
The City of Annapolis struck agreements with four employee unions on Monday, giving employees raises and changing their health benefits in retirement. Mayor Josh Cohen, who will stand re-election next week, said the four-year agreements are a "real feather in Annapolis' cap" and came after 14 months of negotiations with the unions. City Manager Michael Malinoff said the contracts are "an affordable solution" for the city to shore up its pension and retiree health care programs, which currently are underfunded and have put the city's bond ratings at risk.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
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NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Anne Arundel County has reached agreements with all five employee unions whose contracts were the focal point of last spring's budget debate. "Thank God," said Councilman Edward R. Reilly, a Crofton Republican. "It was a long and arduous journey to arrive here." The last of the one-year contracts was ratified Thursday by the county firefighters union. "We're not happy with it," said Keith Wright, the president of the county firefighters union. "If we had been treated differently ... we might have a different opinion of ending up in the same place.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Howard Friedman has heard the chatter from his own community to Capitol Hill - sometimes questions, sometimes complaints about the federal workforce, its size and its cost. The Gaithersburg man, an attorney and union leader at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, wants to change the conversation. "We've been criticized far too long, strictly on matters dealing with the size of the workforce and our compensation," he said. "I think people don't really understand the direct connection between what we do and the quality of life in our country for taxpayers and for everybody.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2002
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has dropped a proposal to sharply increase how much state employees pay for health care, but the administration is holding firm to 2 percent cost-of-living pay raises. Under a tentative deal reached this week with the union representing about 5,000 state professional employees, workers would receive 2 percent cost-of-living adjustments - but not until May 2003, 10 months after the contract goes into effect. The largest state union - representing 35,000 other Maryland workers - is still negotiating.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
Maryland state workers are poised to claim a share of the state's nearly $1 billion surplus in the form of an 8 percent pay raise over the next two years. The Glendening administration and three state employee unions settled on that figure yesterday in collective bargaining talks covering about 35,000 employees. The tentative agreements call for 4 percent raises for each of the next two years. While the agreements cover only union-represented workers, they are virtually certain to set the pattern for the state's entire work force of 70,000.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
Carroll County teachers and other school employees will be mailing in ballots over the next month -- making the tough choice between a salary freeze and deep cuts to classroom programs.The executive committees of all five school employee unions accepted new contract terms Friday, giving back a 3 percent raise and all increments they negotiated in a two-year contract last year.Leaders say they are resigned to the need for the wage concessions. They expect the pact to be ratified but also predict a significant number of "no" votes by teachers and other employees.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
Negotiations between the Carroll County Board of Education and five employee unions are taking longer than anyone had expected.Both sides have agreed not to comment on the negotiations, which are due to resume today, but school board President Joseph D. Mish Jr. acknowledged yesterday they are not going well."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 15, 2004
Anne Arundel County has reached agreements with two more of its employee unions, approving pay raises, county officials announced Friday. AFSCME Local 2563, which represents administrative and support workers, and the sheriff's deputies union ratified three-year contracts last week, county officials said. That means the county has announced new agreements with three of its 10 employee unions. All union contracts expire before the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. The new agreements are subject to funding approval from the County Council.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2012
Animal control officer Anthony Maxwell once relied on a weathered blue binder of maps to navigate through a day of picking up stray cats, patrolling parks for loose dogs and investigating cruelty reports. Now, a GPS device on the dashboard of his Baltimore County van alerts him to his next task. When a dead deer in Parkville needs to get picked up, Maxwell gets turn-by-turn directions and knows just when he'll be there - in this case, the trip will take 9 minutes, 44 seconds from Towson.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
The City of Annapolis struck agreements with four employee unions on Monday, giving employees raises and changing their health benefits in retirement. Mayor Josh Cohen, who will stand re-election next week, said the four-year agreements are a "real feather in Annapolis' cap" and came after 14 months of negotiations with the unions. City Manager Michael Malinoff said the contracts are "an affordable solution" for the city to shore up its pension and retiree health care programs, which currently are underfunded and have put the city's bond ratings at risk.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
A union representing nearly 1,500 Baltimore County public employees has reached an agreement with the county to extend its contract through 2016. Members of the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees ratified the extension by a vote of 98 percent, the union said Wednesday. The group — which previously had a labor agreement with the county through 2015 — represents workers including correctional officers and emergency dispatchers. Under their contract, the employees are scheduled to get a 3 percent bonus in November 2014 and a 3 percent cost-of-living increase in July 2015.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | May 19, 2013
One of the more enjoyable aspects of my public career was an excellent relationship with public safety unions. Law enforcement, fire and EMT groups were supportive of my races for the state legislature, Congress and governor. Although not unheard of, such consistent support made for some uneasy moments when national labor organizations (almost exclusively associated with Democratic candidates) were informed about public safety union support for "that Republican Ehrlich. " From a personal perspective, it was easy to separate the unique nature of public safety's job description (public protection being the No. 1 job of government)
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Labor unions representing federal employees reacted angrily to the $3.8 trillion budget unveiled Wednesday by President Barack Obama, who proposed trimming $20 billion from federal retirement benefits - reopening a debate many Democrats felt had been resolved last year. The 2014 spending plan - which arrived months late - would reduce annual budget deficits by an additional $1 trillion over a decade, according to the administration's estimates; raise the federal minimum wage to $9; curb Social Security spending; increase the federal cigarette tax and close tax loopholes the Obama administration has pursued for years without success.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Most of the Howard County public library's 184 employees would have the right to unionize and bargain for pay and benefits under a bill that has been endorsed by the county delegation to Annapolis. The legislation follows an unsuccessful attempt in the 2010 legislative session to pass a bill that would apply to all library employees in the state and is one of 17 county bills now before the Maryland General Assembly. Other county measures cover alcohol sales, charity casino nights, the county sheriff's salary and an array of bond bills for construction projects.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2012
Animal control officer Anthony Maxwell once relied on a weathered blue binder of maps to navigate through a day of picking up stray cats, patrolling parks for loose dogs and investigating cruelty reports. Now, a GPS device on the dashboard of his Baltimore County van alerts him to his next task. When a dead deer in Parkville needs to get picked up, Maxwell gets turn-by-turn directions and knows just when he'll be there - in this case, the trip will take 9 minutes, 44 seconds from Towson.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 18, 2003
Anne Arundel County teachers will learn today whether the school board intends to follow the County Council's lead and lift pay freezes imposed by County Executive Janet S. Owens. The day after the council defeated a pay freeze for public safety union members, a few hundred teachers held a rally yesterday in rainy Annapolis to protest, among other issues, the proposed freeze on their salaries. The rally capped a month-old "work-to-rule" job action at more than half the county's 117 schools, where teachers have been working the minimum hours required by their contracts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 17, 2003
The Anne Arundel County Council rejected a salary freeze last night for five employee unions, throwing the county's budget off balance and prompting an immediate response from the county executive - a statement saying she will lay off about 35 employees. "Now, I am required to send out the layoff notices and it makes me heartsick to do so," County Executive Janet S. Owens said in a written statement less than an hour after the vote. "It did not have to be this way." Last month, the council unanimously approved an $895 million operating budget for next fiscal year that was based on wage freezes for nearly all county employees.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
As a Baltimore County taxpayer, I have a few suggestions for County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to include in his ongoing union contract negotiations with public employees: No more using unused sick leave to boost retirement. Sick leave is a benefit when an employee or family member is sick. It is not to be used as a retirement benefit. Don't come to work sick. Double the amount required to be in the pension program and the health program. No more paid holidays in excess of the normal private sector holidays, especially Black Friday.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
John Gage, national president of the American Federation of Government Employees, has announced he will retire in August after leading the politically powerful union for the past nine years. The Baltimore resident, who is 66, has battled with Congress and the White House over recent cuts to the federal workforce. A Pittsburgh native, Gage was a minor-league catcher in the Orioles organization in the late 1960s. He worked for the Social Security Administration in the 1970s as a disability claims examiner.
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