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By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | May 8, 1994
Next week is Small Business Week, and nowadays you have more reasons than ever to celebrate if you own one of the more than 20 million small businesses in this country.While larger companies faltered during the recession, many of you flourished. Virtually all new jobs today are coming from new business start-ups, and while larger companies laid off 1.4 million workers from 1988 to 1990, companies with fewer than 20 employees hired more than 4 million new employees.Some of the most successful working women I know run small businesses, and they share certain characteristics and skills that have helped make them successful.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
— After a year that saw sequestration, furloughs and a partial government shutdown, half of the federal workforce is considering leaving for the private sector, a marketing firm has found. The top reasons they are thinking about a move, according to a survey of current federal workers by Market Connections Inc.: a three-year pay freeze, the political environment in Washington and the lure of a better salary in the private sector. Market Connections surveyed employees from mid-December to mid-January, when Washington was offering the workforce a few glimmers of hope: Congress was negotiating a budget deal that eased sequestration cuts and reduced the likelihood of more furloughs or another shutdown, and President Barack Obama ordered a 1 percent pay raise for federal employees . Still, the results reflect continuing insecurity and frustration among workers.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 1991
Employee buyoutsAs companies try to cut costs, they are turning to voluntary severance and early retirement programs, known as employee buyouts, to reduce the size of their work forces -- often before resorting to outright layoffs.More than 40 percent of employers canvassed in a national survey earlier this year said they were trying to eliminate employees. Of these, 42 percent were using voluntary buyouts as part of their work force reduction strategies, according to a survey of 125 companies conducted by Hewitt Associates, a Lincolnshire, Ill.-based benefits consultant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 8, 2012
In a show that covers such a broad scale both in geography and character count, it's easy to forget that there are some episodes when checking in with everybody will be simply impossible. Especially in starting a new season, there was always the sense after “The North Remembers” that the second episode would need to back-burner a few of the major plotlines to catch up with everyone else. But “The Night Lands” does not disappoint despite leaving Robb, Joffrey, Sansa and Catelyn on the bench.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | July 28, 1993
NO DOUBT there are plenty of rocket scientists in the United States (many of them in Baltimore), but society, abetted by the news media, has transformed the phrase into a metaphor. So far in 1993, "rocket scientist" has appeared a dozen times in The Sun and The Evening Sun, almost always as a figure of speech:"It doesn't take a rocket scientist to realize this market is expensive." Eric Kobren, investment expert, in a column, July 14."You don't have to be a rocket scientist to see that this is inappropriate."
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | September 23, 1991
OK, your small company has set up a charitable giving program, using the guidelines we looked at last week. Your work isn't over, though. Once such a program is under way, what are some of the do's and don'ts that make it successful?Focus. To be effective, a charitable giving program, whether it is DuPont's $30 million program or the local consulting firm's $3,000 program, should be focused. Sure, it's a good idea to have some discretionary money put aside for the local Scout troop, but without concentrating most of the funds in a targeted area, giving programs are doomed.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
— After a year that saw sequestration, furloughs and a partial government shutdown, half of the federal workforce is considering leaving for the private sector, a marketing firm has found. The top reasons they are thinking about a move, according to a survey of current federal workers by Market Connections Inc.: a three-year pay freeze, the political environment in Washington and the lure of a better salary in the private sector. Market Connections surveyed employees from mid-December to mid-January, when Washington was offering the workforce a few glimmers of hope: Congress was negotiating a budget deal that eased sequestration cuts and reduced the likelihood of more furloughs or another shutdown, and President Barack Obama ordered a 1 percent pay raise for federal employees . Still, the results reflect continuing insecurity and frustration among workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 8, 2012
In a show that covers such a broad scale both in geography and character count, it's easy to forget that there are some episodes when checking in with everybody will be simply impossible. Especially in starting a new season, there was always the sense after “The North Remembers” that the second episode would need to back-burner a few of the major plotlines to catch up with everyone else. But “The Night Lands” does not disappoint despite leaving Robb, Joffrey, Sansa and Catelyn on the bench.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
Employees at Carefirst BlueCross BlueShield, the region's largest insurer, can work from home several days a week. Hunt Valley-based McCormick & Co. lets some full-time spice plant employees work four-day weeks. And in the "flexible workplace" of Harris-Kupfer Architects in Baltimore, employees' kids can tag along to the office, where they curl up on the lounge couch to play video games on snow days. However they define it, more companies in Maryland and beyond have adopted flexible workplace policies.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Pelline and Jeff Pelline,San Francisco Chronicle | March 15, 1992
While rank-and-file employees don't receive as many perquisites as chief executives -- or members of the House of Representatives, for that matter -- many get benefits that seem impressive in these financially difficult times.Airline employees receive free or cheap plane tickets. Utility workers get discounts on their telephone and energy bills. Retail clerks save money on clothing and stereos. Bank employees get free checking accounts and low-interest loans. These perks can save an employee hundreds and even thousands of dollars annually, and in many cases they are extended to retired employees as well.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
Employees at Carefirst BlueCross BlueShield, the region's largest insurer, can work from home several days a week. Hunt Valley-based McCormick & Co. lets some full-time spice plant employees work four-day weeks. And in the "flexible workplace" of Harris-Kupfer Architects in Baltimore, employees' kids can tag along to the office, where they curl up on the lounge couch to play video games on snow days. However they define it, more companies in Maryland and beyond have adopted flexible workplace policies.
NEWS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
When Mark Czajka learned the Food Network was looking for groups that compete with food the way famous chefs battle on the hit show Iron Chef America, he thought it would a great event for his office. Czajka, who is director of new technology at Automated Graphic Systems Inc. in Charles County and a huge fan of the Food Network, e-mailed the network. If his company had its own Iron Chef competition, it could be fun for employees and great for morale, and could help recruit workers. And so Battle Peanut Butter was born.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
Since he became chairman and chief executive of Columbia National Mortgage Co. in 1993, David J. Gallitano has grown the company from a modest enterprise of 13 branches in seven states to the country's 65th-largest residential loan servicing company, all the while maintaining a low public profile."
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | May 8, 1994
Next week is Small Business Week, and nowadays you have more reasons than ever to celebrate if you own one of the more than 20 million small businesses in this country.While larger companies faltered during the recession, many of you flourished. Virtually all new jobs today are coming from new business start-ups, and while larger companies laid off 1.4 million workers from 1988 to 1990, companies with fewer than 20 employees hired more than 4 million new employees.Some of the most successful working women I know run small businesses, and they share certain characteristics and skills that have helped make them successful.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | July 28, 1993
NO DOUBT there are plenty of rocket scientists in the United States (many of them in Baltimore), but society, abetted by the news media, has transformed the phrase into a metaphor. So far in 1993, "rocket scientist" has appeared a dozen times in The Sun and The Evening Sun, almost always as a figure of speech:"It doesn't take a rocket scientist to realize this market is expensive." Eric Kobren, investment expert, in a column, July 14."You don't have to be a rocket scientist to see that this is inappropriate."
BUSINESS
By Jeff Pelline and Jeff Pelline,San Francisco Chronicle | March 15, 1992
While rank-and-file employees don't receive as many perquisites as chief executives -- or members of the House of Representatives, for that matter -- many get benefits that seem impressive in these financially difficult times.Airline employees receive free or cheap plane tickets. Utility workers get discounts on their telephone and energy bills. Retail clerks save money on clothing and stereos. Bank employees get free checking accounts and low-interest loans. These perks can save an employee hundreds and even thousands of dollars annually, and in many cases they are extended to retired employees as well.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
Since he became chairman and chief executive of Columbia National Mortgage Co. in 1993, David J. Gallitano has grown the company from a modest enterprise of 13 branches in seven states to the country's 65th-largest residential loan servicing company, all the while maintaining a low public profile."
NEWS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
When Mark Czajka learned the Food Network was looking for groups that compete with food the way famous chefs battle on the hit show Iron Chef America, he thought it would a great event for his office. Czajka, who is director of new technology at Automated Graphic Systems Inc. in Charles County and a huge fan of the Food Network, e-mailed the network. If his company had its own Iron Chef competition, it could be fun for employees and great for morale, and could help recruit workers. And so Battle Peanut Butter was born.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1991
Employee buyoutsAs companies try to cut costs, they are turning to voluntary severance and early retirement programs, known as employee buyouts, to reduce the size of their work forces -- often before resorting to outright layoffs.More than 40 percent of employers canvassed in a national survey earlier this year said they were trying to eliminate employees. Of these, 42 percent were using voluntary buyouts as part of their work force reduction strategies, according to a survey of 125 companies conducted by Hewitt Associates, a Lincolnshire, Ill.-based benefits consultant.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | September 23, 1991
OK, your small company has set up a charitable giving program, using the guidelines we looked at last week. Your work isn't over, though. Once such a program is under way, what are some of the do's and don'ts that make it successful?Focus. To be effective, a charitable giving program, whether it is DuPont's $30 million program or the local consulting firm's $3,000 program, should be focused. Sure, it's a good idea to have some discretionary money put aside for the local Scout troop, but without concentrating most of the funds in a targeted area, giving programs are doomed.
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