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NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN | January 4, 2006
With the General Assembly to meet next week, lobbying activity has stepped up on both sides of a contentious bill that would require large companies -- effectively just Wal-Mart -- to spend more on employee health care. The Maryland Chamber of Commerce released a legal opinion yesterday concluding that the legislation is illegal because it trumps federal law. Also yesterday, Health Care for All, an advocacy group, announced that it was airing radio ads urging the Assembly to override the governor's veto of the bill.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Mid Atlantic Medical Services Inc., the Rockville HMO operator, said yesterday it expects to begin settlement discussions soon on a federal audit that said that it overcharged for premiums on federal employee health insurance from 1992 to MAMSI announced Wednesday, when it released its third quarter financial results, that it was setting aside $16.5 million for the possible settlement. It had disclosed the audit in August, in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.Elizabeth Sammis, a MAMSI senior director and spokeswoman, said the company had received the draft audit in May, had responded to the draft and was awaiting a reply from the federal Office of Personnel Management, which administers the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
As a Baltimore County physician leader, I support the opinion of the city physicians ( "Hopkins should support its employees," April 7). Employees should make enough so that we are not paying their children's health care cost through Medicaid. As a Johns Hopkins graduate, I am aware of what an honor it is supposed to be to get underpaid to work at Hopkins. It reminds me of Mos Def's character helping the Hopkins surgeon in the movie, "Something the Lord Made," and Henrietta Lacks' cells becoming the immortal HeLa cell lines.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
The League of American Bicyclists awarded a bronze Bicycle Friendly Business Award to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, in North Laurel. APL was recognized for promoting employee health and social responsibility through its cycling club and cycling amenities. Some members of the APL cycling club commute daily and travel more than 24 miles each way.
EXPLORE
November 26, 2011
Tower Federal Credit Union and Verizon Wireless, in North Laurel, received Innovations in Wellness awards from the Howard County Health Department's "Healthy Howard" program. The award recognized Tower's progressive "Wealth of Wellness" employee wellness program. Verizon Wireless earned the highest, gold level recognition from Healthy Howard, Inc. and was named among Howard County's healthiest workplaces for the third consecutive year. The Healthy Howard Initiative recognizes businesses that are committed to improving employee health and well-being.
NEWS
January 15, 1992
Registered nurse Libby Fuss, director of employee health and infection control at Carroll County General Hospital, was recently awarded afive-year certification as an infection control specialist by the Certification Board of Infection Control.CBIC is an independent accreditation agency that provides technical support for health-care professionals in the field of communicable diseases.Certification requires preparation about the causes and prevention of nosocomial infections, a specialty that focuses on diseases acquired in hospitals or health-care settings.
BUSINESS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
A courtroom challenge to a Maryland law requiring Wal-Mart Stores Inc. to increase spending for employee health care should be tossed out because the legislation gives the retail giant several alternatives, including setting up first-aid stations or creating health savings accounts for workers, lawyers for the state said yesterday. In February, a retail trade group filed suit on behalf of the discounter to strike down the so- called Wal-Mart law passed earlier this year by the General Assembly, saying federal rules don't allow states to specify companies' benefits.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | October 11, 1990
The filing deadline for next year's election of a Baltimore City comptroller is not until next summer -- but already the fur is flying.On Monday, Councilwoman Jacqueline F. McLean, D-2nd, announced she would run for comptroller. Less than 24 hours later she was tangling with unannounced challenger Joseph T. "Jody" Landers, D-3rd, over whether the city should pay for optional health benefits for municipal employees called to reserve duty in the Persian Gulf.The verbal tussle began at Tuesday night's council meeting, when Councilman Landers introduced a resolution calling for continued payment of the city portion of employee health insurance premiums for reservists.
NEWS
By Ann Cox | September 11, 1997
TODAY IS YOUR first day at your new job. You're given the typical forms to fill out.You complete a questionnaire about your current state of health, including questions about family medical history and allergies. What happens to that information after you provide it? What happens if you confide in a company health professional at your workplace about a worsening ulcer, a difficult pregnancy or a chronic ailment?Most individuals assume that their personal health information will be kept confidential, but few laws exist to protect this kind of information.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
There's a good chance during open enrollment this fall that you will be offered a high-deductible insurance plan with a savings account - if you haven't already been nudged into one. Increasingly, employers are offering this as a way to rein in their health insurance costs. The high deductible means lower premiums, benefits experts say. And employees - confronted with the prospect of potentially paying thousands of dollars before insurance kicks in - are less likely to run to the emergency room for minor problems, which also keeps costs down.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Catholic leaders launched a nationwide campaign challenging the Obama administration's health policies with a Mass at Baltimore's Basilica of the Assumption on Thursday evening, filling the 200-year-old stone structure with supporters. The standing-room-only crowd stood and applauded when Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori, leader of the Roman Catholic bishops' "Fortnight for Freedom" initiative, entered. A separate crowd of people outside, most of them Catholic, held signs protesting the event, one of which read, "Bishops!
NEWS
February 8, 2012
Recently, Cardinal-designateEdwin F. O'Brienwrote a stirring letter to all those who worship in the Baltimore Archdiocese, calling on their help to "regain our religious freedom. " The impassioned call to arms suggests the federal government has dealt a "heavy blow" to Catholics and has "cast aside" the First Amendment. What could have so angered the 72-year-old soon-to-be advisor to the pope to justify his call for prayer and fasting until "religious liberty" is restored? Remarkably, it was the recent decision of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Servicesthat requires future health insurance policies, including those administered by religious hospitals and charities, to cover contraception and sterilization.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
The League of American Bicyclists awarded a bronze Bicycle Friendly Business Award to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, in North Laurel. APL was recognized for promoting employee health and social responsibility through its cycling club and cycling amenities. Some members of the APL cycling club commute daily and travel more than 24 miles each way.
EXPLORE
November 26, 2011
Tower Federal Credit Union and Verizon Wireless, in North Laurel, received Innovations in Wellness awards from the Howard County Health Department's "Healthy Howard" program. The award recognized Tower's progressive "Wealth of Wellness" employee wellness program. Verizon Wireless earned the highest, gold level recognition from Healthy Howard, Inc. and was named among Howard County's healthiest workplaces for the third consecutive year. The Healthy Howard Initiative recognizes businesses that are committed to improving employee health and well-being.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 1, 2009
If you don't have a wellness program yet at work, one likely will come your way soon. And if you do, count on your employer aggressively making sure you participate. Employers generally are still cutting benefits and shifting more health care costs onto you. But they are throwing more money into wellness programs, hoping you'll adopt a healthier lifestyle and that insurance costs will go down over time. "We have tried everything else. There is nothing left," says Sara Taylor with benefits consultant Hewitt Associates.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
As a Baltimore County physician leader, I support the opinion of the city physicians ( "Hopkins should support its employees," April 7). Employees should make enough so that we are not paying their children's health care cost through Medicaid. As a Johns Hopkins graduate, I am aware of what an honor it is supposed to be to get underpaid to work at Hopkins. It reminds me of Mos Def's character helping the Hopkins surgeon in the movie, "Something the Lord Made," and Henrietta Lacks' cells becoming the immortal HeLa cell lines.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley began running the fifth television advertisement of his gubernatorial campaign yesterday, focusing on a health care platform he has rolled out over the past several weeks. Without mentioning his opponent by name, the 30-second spot suggests Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has "sided with the big insurance companies," a reference to this year's debate over employee health care costs at Wal-Mart, the campaign said. What the ad says: The ad starts with white text on a black background that reads, "healthcare we can afford."
NEWS
July 2, 2009
Four years ago, when Maryland legislators approved what became known as the Wal-Mart bill - a mandate that would have forced the retailing giant to either pay a minimum amount for employee health benefits or a hefty penalty to the state - it was derided by the company as both bad public policy and illegal. The latter objection proved to be true. It was thrown out by a federal appeals court as a violation of federal law that limits states' ability to regulate employee benefits. But the reasoning behind the proposal was sound: If companies are to compete on a level playing field, how can some be burdened with the obligation of providing increasingly expensive health care insurance while others are not?
NEWS
May 6, 2008
Smart employers know that offering good salaries and perks will help attract the best and brightest employees. That's why a growing number, including a majority of Fortune 500 companies, are choosing to extend health insurance benefits to same-sex domestic partners. It's a logical step for companies that genuinely seek to end workplace discrimination. The public sector is moving to do the same, which makes it all the more unfortunate that Gov. Martin O'Malley has not chosen to provide such a benefit to state employees.
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